Assorted links

by on July 28, 2009 at 12:05 pm in Uncategorized | Permalink

1. God and majors.

2. Will scientists lose authority?

3. American Spectator review of Create Your Own Economy.

4. Is The Nichepaper the future?

5. Substitutes are everywhere; the culture that is India.

Walt July 28, 2009 at 12:41 pm

Scientists have authority?

anon July 28, 2009 at 2:12 pm

#5

Wonder what will happen in India when they can easily get porn on their TVs, especially late night porn….

Brian Moore July 28, 2009 at 2:30 pm

India should really look into a far more effective solution, as China has:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbU1EBYh0ZQ

Jeremy N July 28, 2009 at 7:10 pm

When reading the article about how scientists’ views differ from the public, I began to wonder how they defined scientist. Apparently 1000 members of AAAS qualifies as a random sampling of “scientists.” I think they should try some other definitions of scientist and make sure the results match.

Ricardo July 29, 2009 at 2:38 am

Re: #2, the main difference is that some of those scientists who the general public consider non-ideological self-identify as liberal (the figures for conservative scientists — 9% v. 2% — are such that it isn’t a major difference). One possible explanation is that scientists who are in a university environment will be around many liberals and so any stigma associated with calling oneself liberal will tend to fall away. “Liberal,” “Conservative,” and “Neither” are such ill-defined concepts in American political discourse I’m not sure we can read too much into this.

John Dewey July 29, 2009 at 11:57 am

from link 1: “The odds of going to college increase for high school students who attend religious services more frequently or who view religion as more important in their lives. The researchers speculate that there may be a “nagging theory” in which fellow churchgoers encourage the students to attend college. “

Isn’t it more likely that those who embrace religion before adulthood are – rightly or wrongly – more optimistic about their future? Wouldn’t optimistic people be more likely to forego short term income in order to prepare better for the future they believe awaits them?

I’m not arguing that the unreligious cannot be optimists. I’m just saying that religion has been correlated with optimism.

Haven’t those who attended religious services demonstrated deferred gratification tendencies? They chose to give up weekend fun time in order to gain … something …. to help them in the future. That should ease acceptance of the deferred gratification implied by a college education.

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