Assorted links

by on March 12, 2010 at 11:52 am in Web/Tech | Permalink

1. Rural Mayans on the "trolley problem."

2. Arnold Kling on the Johnson and Kwak book (send me a review copy!).  And here is Arnold on liberals and libertarians.

3. Markets in everything and here the Gnome-be-Gone.

4. A good point about Afghanistan.

5. Love motels in Taiwan.

Tommaso March 12, 2010 at 12:35 pm

Tyler, maybe you can add this to the markets in everything series:

Service Cares (managed by atheists) for Pets Orphaned Due to the Rapture

http://blogs.nashvillescene.com/pitw/2010/03/service_cares_for_pets_orphane.php#more

Right Wing-nut March 12, 2010 at 1:15 pm

As I read it, rural Mayans come out the same on the “trolley problem”. It was the other questions–direct verses indirect harm and harm by omission verses commission that there was a difference.

But I’m pretty sure that I could have saved the good professor some trouble. I grew up on a farm in the middle of western Kansas. Despite my current urban existence, I was offended by the suggestion that setting a trap is more moral than directly causing harm. I also recall being shocked & offended to find that the courts have ruled that police are under no obligation to intervene preemptively. (As I recall, the case involve a woman who was murdered after begging police for protection.)

I also observe that there is a commandment in the “Old Testament” “Do not stand idle by the blood of your brother”. Based on this, Orthodox Judaism considers it a positive commandment to intervene to protect others.

Looks to me like someone wanted a free trip to Central America.

Sigivald March 12, 2010 at 3:21 pm

The Gnome-be-Gone might-be-interesting, but it’s too bad their website is so broken and flash-infested for content, that I can’t see what it looks like.

Good web designers know that you should show people a picture, and let them use zoom-and-pan-and-animate trash if they desire, not by default and with no workarounds.

yuk_love March 12, 2010 at 7:48 pm

@Taiwan — lots of money not much taste. One shot reminds me of the strip dancer joint in Lost in Translation. Emulating Japan?

Andrew March 14, 2010 at 3:14 am

Bernie,

No, you are probably wrong. Wilkinson and Kling are probably more proud that libertarians would be less likely to watch an authority cudgel a human in the head for money, or would more likely to accept a blood transfusion from someone morally unpure because the tradeoff of saving life is worth more than the superstition of morally tainted blood, or be more willing to say the emperor has no clothes.

Joe, I read your response. You say that the market is more likely to fill a rich man’s pool than provide it to the poor. That may be true. But where there are real markets, that is a moot point because there is an overabundance of the stuff. Look for real shortages and you probably won’t find a market.

There also seems to be discussion over there about ‘universal education,’ roads, and probably healthcare. Read the history and I bet a lot of these things were developed by the market before being taken over by the government.

And mulp apparently doesn’t believe people have driveways.

Eric H March 14, 2010 at 11:49 am

That Gnome-Be-Gone thing is a hoax initiated by kde fanboys.

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