Assorted links

by on April 4, 2010 at 1:23 pm in Books, Web/Tech | Permalink

1. Judging bloggers by their books. (it's a tie for first)

2. The defining books of recent French literature? (in French, useful list in any case)

3. Richard Thaler: trading up in the NFL draft isn't worth it.

4. Markets in everything.

5. Is Colonial art just a sad pastiche?

Bock April 4, 2010 at 2:24 pm

1. Category: “My interests are more diverse than you know!†
Winner: * Cowen: Proust, Remembrance of Things Past

Your list was great, but how does listing one of the most acclaimed literary works of the 20th century show diversity? It’s kind of like listing Stairway to Heaven as your favorite song from the 70′s.

It does, however, say a lot about the American Conservative’s notion of diversity.

NathanS April 4, 2010 at 3:28 pm

I disagree with the draft thing. Bad teams pick first. Bad teams also suck at making picks.

gigi April 4, 2010 at 6:17 pm

great list!

k April 4, 2010 at 7:21 pm

Dumas was french of Caribbean descent. Maldoror was from Uruguay and one of the most famous french writers was not even french, Rousseau

Jeff April 4, 2010 at 7:33 pm

Bad teams may take higher draft picks, but the metric used here — how many games a player starts — favors draft picks playing on bad teams. Furthermore, the fact that prognosticators are able to successfully predict which players will be taken in what part of the draft suggests that, even if the order of teams were jumbled, players would be selected in the same order to at least a first approximation, which suggests that team scouting should affect Thaler’s result only at the margin.

Roy April 4, 2010 at 8:16 pm

Gao Xingjian writes in Chinese, and his getting the Nobel is an embarassment. He is not very good, at least in my opinion, and the opnly reason he won is that his Swedish translator, Göran Malmqvist, was on the Nobel committee that year.

Michael G. Heller April 4, 2010 at 10:20 pm

@5 “That’s the great thing about the field, she adds. ‘You can just sink your teeth into practically any subject you like, and you’re going to make a major contribution’.†

Makes one wonder to what extent a new interest in colonial Latin American art is being driven by a niche market disproportionality in the economy of western humanities — an oversupply of art historians with marginally indigenista ideologies and a shortage of cutting edge subject areas? But what does it matter if as an unintended consequence the images receive more respectful attention. Hopefully the quality of restoration will improve. Un-restored dirty, dark paintings seen in a provincial church or museum look better than glossy over-cleaned ones in the capital city gallery.

The article concentrates on cross-over that occurred as indigenous artists were trained in European techniques and applied them within the canon of Ibero-Catholic high art in places like Potosi. More neglected and I think rarer are the artefacts produced by the adoption of European technologies such as glazing in colonial period indigenous popular art. It’s weird to see a heathenish very old Peruvian peasant object (like an anthropomorphic conopa used as a chicha vessel with a huge sacrilegious grin on its face and one wooden leg) in glazed turquoise blue.

MikeY April 4, 2010 at 11:04 pm

They adjusted “# of games started in the first 5 years” for position. That’s in the article.

They’ve also done pro bowls, and the result is the same. what else do you want? How many years, on average, does a team get out of a draft pick in the free-agency NFL?

Curt Fischer April 5, 2010 at 2:20 am

It is strange to see economists make arguments about optimal strategies for choosing/trading draft picks, all the while using only metrics related to wins or player performance.

Winning is great, but what about the bottom line? How much is the media hoopla worth that will inevitably surround a flashy, famous first-round draft pick? Tim Tebow will probably increase ticket sales and TV viewership more than a few offensive linemen, even if the offensive linemen turn out to be Pro Bowl caliber and Tim Tebow turns out to be a dud.

drobviousso April 5, 2010 at 10:27 am

“what else do you want?”
1)% of players, per snap, drafted (or RFA’ed) by the team they are playing for (ie. a team playing 75% players they drafted per snap is rated higher than a team playin 50%).

2)Same as 1), but weighted by wins, Football Outsider’s DVOA, or Advanced NFL Stat’s Team Efficiency (ie. a team with 75% players drafted and 10 wins/Positive DVOA/High efficiency is rated higher than 75% and 6 wins/Negative DVOA/Low efficiency)

3)# of players drafted signed to a second contract or contract extension above league minimum. This will show the value of the picks to stick around, even if they end up on another team.

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