Assorted links

by on May 11, 2010 at 7:06 am in Web/Tech | Permalink

1. The productivity of Robert Tollison.

2. 1860 NYT review of Darwin.

3. Blog on ulterior motives.

4. In Italy, they run a "divorce trade fair."

5. Markets in everything (via Yana): refrigerator especially designed for storing kimchee.  Korean version here.

6. Which Metro areas have been the big winners and losers lately?  (NB: Michael Mandel is one of the most important economists writing today.)

Mara Dobrescu May 11, 2010 at 7:36 am

Actually, there is an annual “divorce trade fair” in France as well. It’s called “Le Salon de la Séparation, du Divorce et du Veuvage”. Last year’s website: http://www.salon-du-divorce.com/
This year the event will take place on 6-7 November 2010. (http://www.nouveaudepart.fr/index.php/bb/1/cms_categorie/64297/content/categorie/id/64297/CurrentLanguage/4)

E. Barandiaran May 11, 2010 at 8:22 am

Tyler, I’m surprised that you have made no comment on what is going on in U.K. Yes, I know that yesterday you were busy trying to understand the Euro bailout and its implications for the past and the future of the European Union, but please take a look at the U.K. circus. The old clown is out but there are many others ready to take his job. I like what Roger Simon wrote last night:
“I’m beginning to have nostalgia for Bernie Madoff. At least he knew he was operating a Ponzi scheme. The clowns in charge of the UK have been running one for years and seem to be totally clueless about it. Or, perhaps more likely, they’re even more corrupt than Madoff. They know the welfare state is a Ponzi scheme, but they need it to stay in power. And they will stay in power at everyone’s expense, especially the working stiffs of the United Kingdom, the very people they pretend to help.”

Danny May 11, 2010 at 9:12 am

#6 – I was disappointed in the level of analysis. Sure, highly educated places did worse than places with low educational attainment. But did it occur to him that the increases could be due to change in educational attainment over time?

CEOs for Cities recently did some research on certain policy goals and outcomes that affect income growth, and found that increasing college graduation rates by 1% can result in $124 Billion increase in income in cities with populations over 1 million. Now I don’t know if I trust their analysis because it seems like those results could have large standard deviations. But even if the analysis is poor, it demonstrates the idea that with regards to income growth, absolute educational attainment doesn’t matter as much as change in educational attainment.

mark May 11, 2010 at 10:36 am

Enjoyed the link to the contemporaneous Darwin review, thanks.

Sigivald May 11, 2010 at 4:01 pm

Even better, the Samsung Kimchi refrigerator on that site will ferment it for you.

Well, “better” if you like Kimchi, that is. I don’t, so much.

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