Assorted links

by on March 8, 2011 at 1:48 pm in Web/Tech | Permalink

1. There is no great stagnation.

2. 88 percent of Bavarian doctors have prescribed placebos.  The study (in German) is here.

3. The culture that is Japan language of decay.

4. "The search for mud is simple."

5. "The Ashtray Argument."

6. Why Mexican shark reunions are so amazing.

7. The culture that is Germany.

8. Will eBooks first take over in New Zealand?

9. Benjamin Barber on Libya and Qaddafi, his defense.

10. Who is slamming rural America?

ad*m March 8, 2011 at 10:14 am

@2

So let me see: patients are given placebo without their consent, and this is a good thing because it saves money?

Because I practice on both sides of the Atlantic as a physician, and have seen the effects of the different systems, this does not surprise me.

It is interesting to see, however, how acceptable it has become to sacrifice individual liberty on the altar of health care affordability.

anon/portly March 8, 2011 at 10:35 am

#9 also an effective critique of The Godfather.

Paul March 8, 2011 at 10:43 am

Australia may have made printed book sales less competitive (lower quality, higher prices, inventory planning problems) with laws favoring/requiring local printing. Has this been a problem in New Zealand?

The Unqualified Econ March 8, 2011 at 11:23 am

You can agree or disagree with #10 — but it seemed to be that TV really should have been contacting Ed Glaeser. I felt like EK was simply summing up a book, not passing judgement. I wish TV had seen Ed Glaeser's recent Daily Show appearance, his head might have exploded.

Jacob March 8, 2011 at 11:55 am

Tyler, did you catch this nugget from Vilsack???

"Corn and ethanol subsidies are one small piece of this. I admit and acknowledge that over a period of time, those subsidies need to be phased out."

Andrew March 8, 2011 at 12:52 pm

Are the farmers subsidized or is the corn subsidized?

Steko March 8, 2011 at 1:36 pm

"But, let's be clear: Vilsack is absolutely right to take Klein's article as a slam on rural America. Klein's claim that he doesn't have a problem with rural America, he just has a problem with subsidies is totally absurd….

Klein's problem with rural America is not the subsidies. It's that they're predominantly conservative."

This is nonsense. Zilch that Ezra Klein said in either article indicates he has any problem with rural America.

He takes issue with the Ag subsidy policy which is a fairly standard position for anyone not actually in politics whether you're left or right.
He takes issue with the idea that it's a reward for military or for poverty by saying you can do that better directly.
He takes issue with the character justification because it's bullshit.

Mal March 8, 2011 at 2:18 pm

One sec, is Vilsak saying we subsidize rural America (and farms) so that we have people willing to enlist in the Military?!?

Aaron March 8, 2011 at 4:02 pm

lol at all these people white knighting for rural areas and faking outrage when someone calls out wheat welfare for what it is

I can't believe someone actually typed out a comment comparing that interview to racism and nativism

Aaron March 8, 2011 at 4:20 pm

"how dare you!!! criticizing corn subsidies is literally the same thing as Jim Crow!!!"

– an idiot in this thread, two posts above you

Michael Stack March 8, 2011 at 5:33 pm

Wow. Ezra's interview is so awesome. I wish more interviews were like that. He didn't let Vilsack get away with anything. I hate watching or listening to interviews where the person being interviewed totally ducks a question, and the interviewer proceeds as if his question was answered. Interviews on TV are more about the status of the person being interviewed than the content.

Kudos to Ezra Klein.

Cyril Morong March 8, 2011 at 5:47 pm

Half of American doctors have given placebos

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,443835,00.htm

Ron Potato March 8, 2011 at 6:43 pm

The commenters weren't comparing rural subsidies to racism. They were comparing Ezra Klein to an idiot.

If he applied his logic as universally as he wants to apply his policies, he would find he is as intolerant as the people he hates, and more dominated by religious belief.

Rahul March 9, 2011 at 2:20 am

It sounds to me like the policy you’re suggesting here is to subsidize the military by subsidizing rural America. Why not just increase military pay?

Klein's "why-not-just-increase-pay" argument sounds elegant and tempting but I am not so certain that it is correct. It might be prohibitively expensive to do so. I suspect that the rural-subsidies could be a cheaper way to get the same outcome.

Asking a person "how much would you sell your life for" might be an expensive way of getting soldiers. Couched in the euphemisms of patriotism, duty, convention, chivalry etc. is a cheaper, albeit, roundabout way of getting inexpensive soldiers. And to sustain that arbitrage it may be imperative to subsidize the institution of a rural lifestyle.

A fully mercenary army is unlikely to be as effective as one motivated on other emotions. No matter how much we paid I doubt we could match outcomes. That would be a strong argument for why we don't try strategies like Klein's "just increase pay".

This rural-subsidy approach to military could be morally repugnant; but if it is economical one cannot argue against the efficiency of the strategy.

rawdawgbuffalo March 9, 2011 at 6:37 am

Obama Hesitant in Libya Because Saudi Arabia is Next

http://rawdawgb.blogspot.com/2011/03/obama-hesita

matt March 9, 2011 at 8:38 am

ha, i sent the Toepener link to my boss yesterday with "how to save on paper towels" and was informed this morning that, "one will be installed later this week on our floor." people here use wads of paper towels to open the door with. with good reason, too, as i consistently see grown men exit stalls/urinals without washing their hands. OOF.

ron March 16, 2011 at 8:10 pm

You may want to check out stepnpull they work great

mbt March 18, 2011 at 6:13 am

negotiations of the Treaty of Rome. Then he was a judge at the Court of Justice for 18 years. If that were not enough, he was also a prolific writer, a profound thinker and one of the people who founded and shaped modern European law and the EU. His 1974 book “The Law of Integration” remains a classic

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