Assorted links

by on August 24, 2011 at 11:04 am in Uncategorized | Permalink

1. How to do direct-to-Kindle publishing.

2. The limits of price discrimination.

3. What the world looks like to a bee.

4. Seven scenarios for the decline of transhumanism.

5. Irish trade surplus hits a new record.

6. DC earthquake devastation.

John B. Chilton August 24, 2011 at 11:09 am

Bleeh:

The strong performance of agri-food exports was also welcomed by IFA president John Bryan. He called on the Government to continue to support primary production.

“Farm schemes are very important in driving output at farm level, which in turn generates economic activity and exports,” he said.

TallDave August 24, 2011 at 1:04 pm

1 Good read, thanks. My wife does some Kindle editing (one of the authors has already dedicated a book to our child, and occasionally someone threatens to pay her) and I may publish something picayune later this year (mostly for my own amusement).

4 Not especially persuasive. I’m much more worried about technical feasibility than whether enough people will want prettiness/health/longevity/continuity. And I don’t buy the Japan anecdote at all, that sounds much more like a functionality and pricing problem.

5 Unexpectedly!

Nick_L August 24, 2011 at 1:24 pm

Not so much transhuman, but at what point does a Government offer its elderly the opportunity to be cryonically preserved, rather than continue to provide unsustainable pension/medicaid support? What would such incentives look like? – 25% reduction in your child’s income tax rates? Zero real estate taxes? Free education for your grandchildren?

Rahul August 24, 2011 at 2:02 pm

#2 It is kind of annoying to get caught behind a hardcore coupon clipper. They need their own lanes.

Andrew' August 24, 2011 at 2:57 pm

Fear the binder!

Dan Dostal August 24, 2011 at 2:16 pm

I noted how the coupon lady said she would shop at another kroger’s. Seems to me the shop manager won. Kroger’s lost no business and that shop manager will have slightly higher profits.

Andrew' August 24, 2011 at 2:55 pm

Why do they do coupons for things they don’t want to get rid of? In other words, why would you sell something at a loss with a coupon? I know about the extreme couponing stuff and I’m not even a grocery store manager. I also wonder how many people dabble in coupons. If you have the fixed cost of doing coupons, it seems you should go large or go home.

Rahul August 24, 2011 at 3:09 pm

Price discrimination? I doubt they make a loss; just lower margins and overhead of processing. Some coupons are manufacturer reimbursed so Krogers wold only process them.

G August 25, 2011 at 1:00 pm

Manufacturer’s coupons and store-issued coupons are different things. Manufacturer’s coupons are reimbursed to the store.

Benny Lava August 24, 2011 at 3:43 pm

#5 “The strong performance of agri-food exports was also welcomed by IFA president John Bryan. He called on the Government to continue to support primary production.”

Keynsian led export boom?

Yancey Ward August 24, 2011 at 5:57 pm

#6 was simply hilarious!

Michael F. Martin August 24, 2011 at 6:14 pm

Re the bees —

human eyes can also detect differences in light polarization too:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haidinger's_brush

Walter McGrain August 24, 2011 at 7:29 pm

Sensing UV light is one thing, but birds actually have it as their fourth primary color, so they see a palette of colors entirely unimaginable to us.

human mathematics August 24, 2011 at 8:21 pm

I believe there are some tetrachromatic people who have an extra type of cone — it wouldn’t be AS foreign to them.

TallDave August 24, 2011 at 9:28 pm

Oooh, I want that gene spliced into me.

human mathematics August 24, 2011 at 8:38 pm

I always arrive after the comments have closed. So several off-topic comments, or rather than are on-topic elsewhere:

1. Thank you for The Great Stagnation.

2. How did you decide upon the price of the book? Did demand elasticity estimation figure anywhere?

3. Why does slower revenue growth imply more crises? (A) People certainly seem more cautious nowadays and less willing to use leverage. (B) Revenue expectations may diminish. (C) Take these two equations. y_t+1 = 1.04 y_t + cauchy(t) and y_t+1 = 1.08 y_t + catastr(t). The distribution of catastr(t) is bimodal with 99% of the mass at 0 and 1% of the mass at -10^9.

4. “[Cheap utility from internet browsing means] downturn hurts less, and that in turn means we will have more recessions and more asset price bubbles. Investors will take more chances, in part because safe returns are lower and in part because financial loss hurts less, in utility terms, than it used to. ”

You’re forgetting the other side. Why work _or_ invest when all I need to be happy is a computer. Conclusion: investors will take fewer chances.

Anyway, investors take chances based on _belief_, and belief in the great stagnation is not widespread. Investors do believe in similar things, such as that the US and other rich countries face a slow path back to growth — but that has more to do with arithmetic than with projections about lack of innovation.

Jake August 24, 2011 at 9:25 pm

Also in Ireland
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/frontpage/2011/0825/1224302934428.html

Maybe they should work in Agribusiness?

gamesliga September 6, 2011 at 12:16 pm

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