Markets in everything

by on November 15, 2011 at 12:37 pm in Uncategorized | Permalink

A new technique of cybercrime is the taking hostage of data.  “I think it’s going to become a more common tactic for attackers,” says Karen Schuler, Senior Managing Director of Kroll.

Here is more.

Brian November 15, 2011 at 12:51 pm

A special advertising section? Must be a slow news day with this and the content-impaired interview with the Oklahoma City economist on the NBA lockout.

Andrew November 15, 2011 at 12:56 pm

That’s the main plot device in Neal Stephenson’s ReamDe, which is good if not quite up to level of some of his past works.

Klug November 16, 2011 at 11:19 am

+1

AndrewL November 15, 2011 at 1:21 pm

When asked for supporting evidence, Karen Schuler responded she would have provided it, but it had been stolen.

John Voorheis November 15, 2011 at 1:51 pm

@Andrew People keep saying things like that, but I have to say that I rather enjoyed it – it certainly held my attention more than the Baroque cycle, which was a chore to finish. And anyway, Stephenson’s output is so heterogeneous that I’m not sure what a ranking even means.

Rob November 15, 2011 at 1:55 pm

As a technology risk consultant I felt obligated to read the link. Unfortunately Brian hit the nail on the head. Marketing bull from Kroll and Mantech is what passes for journalism? Not that I had a high opinion of Business Insider before…

Ken Rhodes November 15, 2011 at 3:28 pm

Rob, if you read a page that carries the title “Special Advertising Section” at the top of EVERY page, then you shouldn’t be offended to find marketing instead of journalism.

Silas Barta November 15, 2011 at 2:01 pm

Shouldn’t this be *Coasean* markets in everything? After all, there’s not much difference between this and making people pay you not to pollute.

Rahul November 15, 2011 at 3:22 pm

How and where does one draw the line between a Coasean bargain and plain old blackmail? I probably misunderstood Coase.

Andrew' November 15, 2011 at 4:39 pm

Between actual harm and bullshit?

k November 18, 2011 at 10:55 am

“In common usage, blackmail is a crime involving threats to reveal substantially true and/or false information about a person to the public, a family member, or associates unless a demand is met”

Blackmail involves a social context, Coasean bargains are bilateral.

Tangurena November 16, 2011 at 1:12 pm

Far too much of what passes for journalism are thinly disguised press releases. I’m reminded of a 2005 essay from Paul Graham on this very subject. He concludes that the rise in internet blogging is the same reason for the collapse in the print news media

>Online, the answer tends to be a lot simpler. Most people who publish online write what they write for the simple reason that they want to. You can’t see the fingerprints of PR firms all over the articles, as you can in so many print publications– which is one of the reasons, though they may not consciously realize it, that readers trust bloggers more than Business Week.

http://www.paulgraham.com/submarine.html

IG November 16, 2011 at 2:46 pm

It is considered polite to indicate a PDF link

wedding dresses November 17, 2011 at 4:21 am

Far too much of what passes for journalism are thinly disguised press releases. I’m reminded of a 2005 essay from Paul Graham on this very subject. He concludes that the rise in internet blogging is the same reason for the collapse in the print news media

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: