Markets in everything

by on May 9, 2013 at 3:39 pm in Law, Medicine | Permalink

The market for methadone vomit in prison is lively, and the preferred recipe for this cocktail is one part puke (strained, please, bartender) to one part Tang.

Here is more, interesting on other points too, by Graeme Wood, mostly on the drug problem in the country of Georgia, and the pointer is from Wonkbook.

Andreas Moser May 9, 2013 at 3:41 pm

Note to myself: never ever read ‘Marginal Revolution’ again while eating dinner.

Andrew' May 9, 2013 at 4:09 pm

I know. Tang is disgusting.

Vernunft May 9, 2013 at 5:53 pm

I’ll take a crab juice.

liberalarts May 9, 2013 at 7:25 pm

This is possibly the grossest sentence that I have ever read.

john personna May 9, 2013 at 8:54 pm

I had a wild idea. What if we put everybody in “solitary” but also gave everyone reduced sentences. Wouldn’t that be equal punishment, with less “crime university,” probably with lower cost .. and no vomit market, good lord.

Mark Thorson May 9, 2013 at 9:38 pm

Ain’t gonna happen. Not here in California, anyway.

http://understandinggov.org/wp-content/uploads/ca_prison21.jpg

Andrew' May 10, 2013 at 8:24 am

That’s another valid approach, assuming we are doing it thoughtfully and methodically, which I am sure California is doing. Your punishment for your crime is you get to be the sub-society where other criminals get to prove they are or are not threats to others. Close proximity and stress can accelerate the test.

affenkopf May 10, 2013 at 1:10 am

Less crime university, much, much more psychological problems.

Andrew' May 10, 2013 at 8:21 am

Depends on how short and how solitary, I would suppose. If the purpose of incarceration is to protect society, including other prisoners, solve for the optimum.

bluto May 10, 2013 at 11:36 am

Ah the Philedelphia model.

Someone needs to visit Eastern State Penitentiary, or at least listent to the very nice overview: http://www.radiolab.org/2007/aug/13/crime-and-penitence/

Dismalist May 9, 2013 at 10:05 pm

Sounds like recycling to me. Supposed to be good, no?

Also shows the absolute inanity of way too many prison sentences. More fines, payable on the installment plan, please.

The gov’t can’t even control prisons: I guess that’s a good sign, for the gov’t won’t be able to control us either! If it does succeed, we can all protest by getting ourselves into prison.

Wasn’t too long ago or too far away where that was all a principled person could do.

Bill May 9, 2013 at 10:26 pm

It’s not recycling; the person who is administered the methadone loses out on the methadone high in exchange for payment. If the vomiter is a legitimate drug addict, this might not be a trivial sacrifice.

Dismalist May 9, 2013 at 11:22 pm

So this is arbitrage?

Legalize and regulate; legalize and regulate.

Bender Bending Rodriguez May 10, 2013 at 11:15 pm

Legalize and regurgitate?

Charlie May 9, 2013 at 10:56 pm

I guess the methadone vomit helps hide the bad taste of the tang.

prior_approval May 10, 2013 at 12:24 am

Wow – so prisoners act just like paratroopers in the 82nd Airborne in the earlier to mid 80s? At least if the former member of the 82nd Airborne (he was mainly stationed in Italy), who was a housemate and fellow GMU student, was a reliable source.

Though the paratroopers of the time (at least in his unit) didn’t strain each other’s puke, and didn’t use Tang.

Justin Case May 10, 2013 at 9:30 am

Was it just macho nonsense or are survival situations where the only thing on the menu is puke common enough to warrant practice?

Floccina May 10, 2013 at 2:37 pm

MY question is why does anyone other the addicts themselves and maybe their families care so much that they vote to make the drugs illegal.

Also:
The article was great up until he last paragraph which was appallingly bad.

Floccina May 10, 2013 at 3:34 pm

Here is that offending last paragraph:
What none of the solutions—whether tending toward radical reform, or severe enforcement—addresses is the impulse that led Pavel to drugs in the first place. He is a lawyer who runs a market stall, a frustrated man who evidently prefers to corrode his veins rather than prolong his misery with sobriety and good health. Ultimately, the solution to the drug problem might be the solution to the problem of life, which is how to navigate our time here with minimal suffering. Unfortunately, the policy that offers that solution will be not a drug policy but an existential one, and it remains as elusive as ever.

Almost the opposite could be proposed. After all there are poorer countries than Georgia and the guy had enough money to become a lawyer. One could say we need to push people like him down to subsistence farming level, so that will too busy working and too poor to buy drugs.

(BTW many democrats will argue with me because I see no harm in buying petroleum from ME and they believe that we should attempt to make the Arabs so poor that they cannot finance terrorism. I think that is stupid but it is want they argue.)

Honza May 10, 2013 at 7:02 pm

What is now known cannot be un-known. Thanks, MR. Really.

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