Assorted links

by on July 14, 2013 at 9:39 am in Uncategorized | Permalink

1. I would bet against betting therapy.

2. The Delhi dilemma (FT).

3. Power struggle in Pakistan.

4. Cola-flavored wine, from France.

5. When police are recorded by video cameras, citizen complaints go way down.

Yancey Ward July 14, 2013 at 10:48 am

If you are going to tape the police, make sure you leave the dog at home.

Andrew' July 14, 2013 at 10:53 am

They are heroes. And highly trained in firearms safety.

Yancey Ward July 14, 2013 at 12:26 pm

Your opinion of dogs is strange to me.

Andrew' July 15, 2013 at 6:24 am

It’s about the cops, of course. Since we are still about 5 years away from people reigning in the cops I might have to change my slogan from “check back with me in 5 years” to “check back with me in 15 years” since I’ve been barking up this tree for a decade.

Ted Craig July 14, 2013 at 10:53 am

4. The actually had a drink in Georgia in the 19th century that was a mix of cola, wine and cocaine. They stopped production when one of the key ingredients became illegal – the wine.

You can read about it here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemberton's_French_Wine_Coca

yo July 14, 2013 at 1:00 pm

Wine + cola is quite common in Southern Europe. Usually youth just mix it on their own. In Spain it’s called calimocho, and the parties are called botellon.

Rahul July 14, 2013 at 2:03 pm

I’ve seen people drink Beer + Cola too in German bars. Referred to as Raedler or Diesel or something.

GiT July 14, 2013 at 2:10 pm

In Britain it’s a Shandy: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shandy

CBBB July 14, 2013 at 4:21 pm

Raedler is Beer + Lemonade. In Bavaria at least they mix cola and White beer and call it a Colaweissen

Hans July 15, 2013 at 6:46 am

In Bavaria they call it a Neger

GiT July 14, 2013 at 2:09 pm

A French guy introduced me to a sort of teenage alcohol concoction consisting of sprite, grenadine, and white wine mixed together. Sort of an alcoholic cherry seven up in the end, I guess.

GiT July 14, 2013 at 2:10 pm

Specifically cheap, crappy white wine I should note.

whatsthat July 14, 2013 at 11:17 am

#2: How long will Dreze and Sen continue their “state works best” approach? I have never understood why health and education should be produced by a “government” and for other essentials – housing/food – it is okay for private enterprise to enter into.

david July 14, 2013 at 11:47 am

Because access to healthcare and education are the things demanded by politically-agitated aspirational middle classes, who can already afford housing and food.

Andrew' July 14, 2013 at 12:19 pm

They should demand anti-aging research and education research.

Andrew' July 14, 2013 at 12:21 pm

So, I took a book into my kid’s gung-ho preschool teacher who aspired to be a public school teacher (I dared not tell her that her aspirations were backwards). She dismissed it out of hand because “doesn’t believe in workbooks.” This wasn’t exactly a workbook, it was a parental/teacher script/protocol. Anyway, did I get my bj the next year when she student taught at the public school and all they did was workbooks? No!

Yancey Ward July 14, 2013 at 12:28 pm

Clearly, your expectations in that last sentence were too high.

Andrew' July 15, 2013 at 6:42 am

All my expectations are too high, including the one where people learn that they were wrong before, so this time when they turn on a dime to follow the authority figure du jour might not be correct.

Marie July 14, 2013 at 9:45 pm

Joke’s on them, then.
Wish they wouldn’t drag the rest of us with them.

mulp July 14, 2013 at 8:15 pm

Private for profit book companies create the books using in schools. Publishers block teachers from creating their own study materials even if non-profit claiming it is theft of their property. Private for profits build the schools and equip them with blackboards, computers, network services. Private for profits often transport kids around.

Food is hardly untouched by lots of government subsidies.

When the food for profits cover all costs entirely and provide free food to those who lack the money to buy food, then I’ll believe that private sector education industry will provide free education to the many more than can’t pay for education which is crammed into a dozen years out of a lifetime. Food costs are spread almost evenly distributed across the entire lifetime.

When it comes to food, the private sector wants government to pay for food for the needy, and when it comes to education, the private sector wants the government to pay for it for everyone.

I have never seen a businessman say “the government fails to educate workers well so I want the government to stop so I can educate the workers I will need in 15-20 years myself so they are properly educated to my standards and pay for it out of my business profits as a capital investment.”

YeyAnotherTom July 14, 2013 at 12:40 pm

The problem with betting therapy is getting people to face their
Fears in a testable situation and then conceding that the worst hadn’t happened even in the face of solid evidence.

x July 14, 2013 at 12:55 pm

No, the problem is that the “fears” are usually very unlikely but catastrophic, so the so-called “betting therapy” would in fact be simply insurance.

And obviously buying insurance shouldn’t convince you to stop buying insurance…

Kelvin July 15, 2013 at 12:11 pm

Or they’re catastrophic to the fearer that any actuarially fair insurance would not pay enough to compensate for the perceived harm, and they don’t participate.

Saturos July 15, 2013 at 12:46 am

I dunno, what about fear of open spaces, etc… it’s more to do with vague nameless fears, etc…, not sure how this responds to concrete experimental results… I think it’s more that the subjects would come with strange neurotic justifications as to how betting isn’t good for them, and doesn’t reveal beliefs.

Shane M July 15, 2013 at 5:07 am

#5. Interesting effect of reducing violent interactions just by officer wearing a camera:
“Rialto’s police officers also used force nearly 60 percent less often — in 25 instances, compared with 61. When force was used, it was twice as likely to have been applied by the officers who weren’t wearing cameras during that shift, the study found.”

Andrew' July 15, 2013 at 6:44 am

Hmmm, since people know that cops will be believed in court I suppose we need invisible cameras to test whether it is the cops or the civilians who are adjusting their behavior.

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