Assorted links

by on August 10, 2013 at 1:26 pm in Uncategorized | Permalink

1. They forgot about the elevator.

2. Is this fertility insurance?  Or crowd-funding for babies?  And Emily Oster on the research behind pregnancy taboos.

3. Parkour markets in everything.

4. “What are the most mindblowing recent advancements people still don’t know about?”

5. How to market a water charity.

6. Interview with Kevin Shields.

Mark Thorson August 10, 2013 at 2:20 pm

18% efficiency! 1000 A/cm^2 power density! If their claims are true, this is a revolution in thermoelectricity!

http://micropower-global.com/technology/how_it_works/

Andreas Moser August 10, 2013 at 3:50 pm

# 1: Spain’s high-rise buildings have often been symptomatic of the wider problems in the country: http://andreasmoser.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/spains-banking-crisis-is-no-surprise/

mulp August 11, 2013 at 11:33 pm

The only point of the building, and the extra floors, was to reap fees from all the debt passing through the bank.

Innovative global banking has no need for reality because it is all about the fees. Its a good thing the banking system crashed or else it would be a 90 story building to earn more fees. But it wouldn’t need elevators because it would have pancaked to 10 stories.

lxm August 10, 2013 at 3:53 pm

#4 – Some amazing stuff. Hope it takes off.

There is no great stagnation.

prior probability August 10, 2013 at 3:56 pm

I loved this excerpt from #5

” … it was generally understood that you didn’t network with other business leaders, in part because networking was, as Chris Sacca, a former Google executive whose venture-capital firm reportedly owns more than 10 percent of Twitter (a stake that could be worth as much as $1 billion), put it to me, not the point and unnecessary, because everyone was already successful. And although we had intermittent cellphone service and wireless Internet throughout the trip, there was an ambivalence about smartphone usage — and strangely enough, technology more generally. (A tip: If you want to fit in among the start-up set, first brag about your gadgets, then brag about how little you use them.)”

Alexei Sadeski August 10, 2013 at 7:29 pm

The content of #4 and the title of #5 are funny, being right next to each other.

A Gen Y Worker August 10, 2013 at 8:00 pm

Yep yep yep. There are whole places of the world that have yet to reap the full benefits of the First Industrial Revolution, now into its 3rd century.

Having technology is great. It is no replacement for the economic, social, and political infrastructure required to be a First World Nation.

Would you rather be a free man in the early 20th Century Midwestern farms or a Chinese kid in 2100 where the Politburo has implanted nanites in your body and will explode you for jacking off too much or whatever? Have no fear! Only criminals should fear the nanite bombs! The innocent have nothing to hide…

Therapsid August 10, 2013 at 8:32 pm

China 2100. In fact, China *today* if you’re a middle class urban resident versus being a farmer in the Midwest in the early 20th century.

Foobarista August 10, 2013 at 9:50 pm

#1: this happens surprisingly frequently in China; my sister-in-law’s condo building was supposed to have an elevator – she lives on the ninth floor – but the developer didn’t build it and went bankrupt before he could be sued to build it. Chinese buildings are supposed to have an elevator if they’re more than six floors, but I’ve seen many that don’t.

She gets an excellent aerobic workout going up and down the stairs several times a day, especially in the insanely hot and humid Shanghai summer months.

Mike W August 11, 2013 at 8:37 pm

Here’s a “mindblowing” technology:

http://www.youtube.com/embed/6LWz4qa2XQA?feature

Richard Davis August 13, 2013 at 11:51 am

Tyler,

I request a post on the opposite list from #4: advances that contrary to popular opinion we have not achieved yet. Example: a quick-acting antidepressant.

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