Measure for Measure (affective computing as a means of social control)

by on January 13, 2014 at 9:33 pm in Science, Web/Tech | Permalink

Cognitive psychologist Mary Czerwinski and her boyfriend were having a vigorous argument as they drove to Vancouver, B.C., from Seattle, where she works at Microsoft Research. She can’t remember the subject, but she does recall that suddenly, his phone went off, and he read out the text message: “Your friend Mary isn’t feeling well. You might want to give her a call.”

At the time, Czerwinski was wearing on her wrist a wireless device intended to monitor her emotional ups and downs. Similar to the technology used in lie detector tests, it interprets signals such as heart rate and electrical changes in the skin. The argument may have been trivial, but Czerwinski’s internal response was not. That prompted the device to send a distress message to her cellphone, which broadcast it to a network of her friends. Including the one with whom she was arguing, right beside her.

There is more here.

derek January 13, 2014 at 10:05 pm

The message he should have got would have read “You are wrong. Get used to it”.

Mark Thorson January 13, 2014 at 10:22 pm

No, no. She was wearing an e-meter. She should have been told she needs to disconnect from this suppressive person. And do the PTS/SP course.

http://www.scientology.cc/en_US/intro/courses/ptssp.html

The Anti-Gnostic January 13, 2014 at 11:09 pm

At the time, Czerwinski was wearing on her wrist a wireless device intended to monitor her emotional ups and downs…That prompted the device to send a distress message to her cellphone, which broadcast it to a network of her friends.

What kind of co-dependent freaks use such a device?

anon January 13, 2014 at 11:10 pm

women

Affe January 13, 2014 at 11:52 pm

The message he actually got was “Don’t let up. You’re winning.”

Rahul January 13, 2014 at 11:56 pm

Have we gotten to the stage where we can at least trust a lie detector? They have been around for decades.

Steve Sailer January 14, 2014 at 1:25 am

Do they bring out new model lie detectors or do they still use giant old ones like in a J. Edgar Hoover photo op? Those big ones like in “Meet the Parents” probably work better as props to terrify people into confessing.

Rahul January 14, 2014 at 1:55 am

The courts still don’t accept them as evidence, right? OTOH FBI / NSA / CIA background checks all seem to include polygraph testing.

I’ve no clue where we stand on validity of even a state of the art lie detector gizmo.

prior_approval January 14, 2014 at 7:45 am

‘I’ve no clue where we stand on validity of even a state of the art lie detector gizmo’

Well, in the U.S., arresting and jailing those who teach how to beat them – http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20130908/00044524444/eight-months-jail-teaching-people-how-to-pass-lie-detector-test.shtml

Rahul January 14, 2014 at 8:55 am

Wow. That sounds horrible. This should get more press.

NPW January 14, 2014 at 12:58 pm

Except the US isn’t just arresting and jailing those who teach how to beat themt. The man who was jailed was convicted of helping conceal criminal activities, such as, smuggling contraband into a jail, accepting bribes, sex with a minor, being involved with a drug cartel, extortion, murder, and kidnapping.

The judge even said that what the offender did was 95% legal when it came to the instruction on beating the lie dectector.

If I fix a car it isn’t illegal. If I, however, knowingly apply bullet resistant panels to a getaway car, I’m going to jail.

Rahul January 14, 2014 at 1:22 pm

What if I teach a guy evasive driving techniques & he uses them in his gateway car? Some of these lines are hard to draw.

prior_approval January 15, 2014 at 3:48 am

‘ Some of these lines are hard to draw.’

Not as hard as they used to be, at least in the U.S. and its pursuit of whatever it is being pursued when arresting and jailing people. For example, there is also this –

‘A man was pulled over for speeding in Lorain County, OH. No big deal there. He was then arrested for having a “hidden compartment” in his car, even though that compartment contained exactly nothing. At all.

Norman Gurley, the 30 year old who was arrested, was charged with violation of Sec. 2923.241, which states:

To enact section 2923.241 of the Revised Code to prohibit designing, building, constructing, fabricating, modifying, or altering a vehicle to create or add a hidden compartment with the intent to facilitate the unlawful concealment or transportation of a controlled substance, prohibit operating, possessing, or using a vehicle with a hidden compartment with knowledge that the hidden compartment is used or intended to be used to facilitate the unlawful concealment or transportation of a controlled substance, and prohibit a person who has committed a first or second degree felony violation of aggravated trafficking in drugs from operating, possessing, or using a vehicle with a hidden compartment.

Let’s just be absolutely clear about the sorts of drugs and illegal substances found in the compartment in Gurley’s car: None. The none kind of drugs. The kind of drugs that go by the street name “nothing” and get you so fucked up, you’d swear you’d taken no drugs at all, because you hadn’t, because they don’t exist. He was arrested for having1

… some components inside the vehicle that did not appear to be factory.

… according to Lt. Michael Combs. Of course, this is absurd. Having a non-factory car is by no means any indicator that you’re planning to do anything illegal, even a “hidden compartment.” Cars are full of “hidden compartments” factory or not.’ http://jalopnik.com/guy-in-ohio-arrested-for-having-empty-compartment-in-hi-1485898693

prior_approval January 13, 2014 at 11:56 pm

Clippy provides another helpful tip.

Age Of Doubt January 14, 2014 at 4:55 am

Great, another source of guilt. “Call your mother, she’s feeling distressed.”
Thanks a lot, Microsoft…

Dan Weber January 14, 2014 at 11:13 am

She worries.

Hamish Atkinson January 14, 2014 at 5:02 am

Great. I want one for my friend. He really hates his phone going off, and often goes off on one. If everyone he knew texted him “Calm down!” he’d have a fit.

Axa January 14, 2014 at 6:50 am

I will only buy cars from vendors that consent using this technology.

TMC January 15, 2014 at 12:02 pm

“She can’t remember the subject”

Bullshit she can’t remember.

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