Assorted links

by on June 8, 2014 at 12:29 pm in Uncategorized | Permalink

1. Will Kurt Tucholsky ever be popular in the English-speaking world?

2. How to operate a military drone.

3. Is it possible to manipulate an election through Facebook?

4. James Hamilton on negative interest rates.

5. Why Jodi Ettenberg loves Saigon.

derek June 8, 2014 at 1:27 pm

3. Does it scale? Last Federal election the Greens focused on one riding with canvassing and intensive campaigning. They got a high turnout in a selected riding and won a seat. The Conservative won a majority by designing a campaign that seemed to discourage liberals from voting, although one might argue that the Liberals did the same. The NDP have always had a good ground game and win seats but not elections.

I would suspect that it would work once, maybe, in specific and targeted locations, but wouldn’t be repeated.

To extrapolate from a small experiment doesn’t make sense.

prior_approval June 8, 2014 at 2:24 pm

1. With one of his most famous quotes being ‘soldiers are murderers’ (‘Soldaten sind Mörder’), I’m not holding my breath for his popularity to take off in a nation that is now killing its citizens using secret orders without possibility of review, meeting what is now considered standard of due process of law, American style.

Here is an example of his context and writing – ‘Tucholsky denounced equally strongly the many political murders which shook the Weimar Republic during its first years. Again and again attempts were made on the lives of left-wing, pacifist and even merely liberal politicians and publicists, for example Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, Walther Rathenau, Matthias Erzberger, Hans Paasche and Philipp Scheidemann or Maximilian Harden. As a court observer in proceedings against right-wing radical Fememörder (murderers carrying out killings ordered by a Vehmgericht) he realised that the judge shared and sympathised with the defendant’s monarchist and nationalist views. In his article Prozeß Harden (Harden Trial) he wrote in 1922.

“The German political murder of the past four years is schematically and tightly organised. (…) Everything is certain from the outset: incentives from anonymous financial backers, the deed (always from behind), sloppy investigation, lazy excuses, a few phrases, pitiful skiving, lenient punishments, suspension of sentences, privileges – “Carry on!” (…) That is not bad justice. That is not poor justice. That is not justice at all. (…)

Even the Balkans and South America will refuse to be compared with this Germany.” (“Prozeß Harden” (“Harden Trial”) in Die Weltbühne; December 21, 1922; p. 638)’ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Tucholsky#Battle_for_the_Republic

So Much for Subtlety June 8, 2014 at 7:22 pm

‘Tucholsky denounced equally strongly the many political murders which shook the Weimar Republic during its first years. Again and again attempts were made on the lives of left-wing, pacifist and even merely liberal politicians and publicists, for example Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg …

Anyone who begins their list of “left-wing, pacifist” politicians with these two would-be mass murderers is lying in such a spectacular way that it deserves some sort of Nobel Prize.

F. Lynx Pardinus June 9, 2014 at 8:45 am

What’s a “would-be mass murderer”?

So Much for Subtlety June 9, 2014 at 9:12 am

Someone who leads a violent Revolution to over-throw a democracy and impose a Stalinist dictatorship would, I think, more or less qualify.

Why do you think otherwise?

Andreas Moser June 8, 2014 at 7:11 pm

#3 reminds me of the book “The Circle” by Dave Eggers. Highly recommended.

Ray Lopez laughs at dragonfruit June 8, 2014 at 8:08 pm

@#5 – “The dragon fruit was in a class of its own, rich in colour and texture.” — true, true. But it has almost no taste whatsoever. Still, it’s very cool looking, agreed.

Jodi Loves Dragonfruit June 9, 2014 at 2:43 am

It’s the perfect snack, really. Hydrating and slightly sweet, with crunchy seeds. The ones in Vietnam are grown so close to Saigon that when ripe they are quite a lot tastier than any others I’ve tried. Definitely not as flavourful as mangosteens, but worth a re-try if you’re ever in Southern Vietnam.

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