Wednesday assorted links

by on February 10, 2016 at 12:15 pm in Uncategorized | Permalink

1 Dean February 10, 2016 at 12:21 pm

“Food trucks cause people to spend more money on eating out.”

Or food trucks are more likely to show up where people spend more money eating out…

2 CorvusB February 10, 2016 at 10:22 pm

Good thought.

3 dbp February 10, 2016 at 12:51 pm

1. Should you be glad if your kid starts listening to heavy metal?

I don’t know about “glad”, weird would be more apt, but that is because I have girls. Hardly any girls I ever knew liked heavy metal.

Two out of the three like pop, so heavy metal would be an improvement. The middle child likes what I like–alternative and classic rock as well as grunge. May she never change.

The guys I knew who were into heavy metal, mostly are pretty normal: Engineers with a wife and a kid or three.

4 anon February 10, 2016 at 1:38 pm

Some types of metal appeal to guitar nerds, because of the technical proficiency required to play the music. Intelligence is correlated with musical proficiency, so I could see this being true.

5 Thor February 10, 2016 at 2:43 pm

Amen to that brother. Classic rock > heavy m > pop

6 Shane M February 10, 2016 at 4:49 pm

I wonder if the IQ correlation is recent? In my youth (80s), metal was a popular genre for many guys (MTV played it alot – Headbangers Ball, etc), but back then it was also associated w/ drinking, partying, anti-establishment and lots of dropouts were big fans also. Yeah some smart guys liked the darkness of some of the songs, but it was often the anti-intellectual/rebel who was into metal also. I’m pretty sure most from the time period could identify with someone who reminded us of either Beavis or Butthead.

I’ll be the first to admit I wasn’t much of a metal fan – I was more into the melodic hard rock – hair band stuff like Van Halen, Bon Jovi, ACDC – but I did have friends who were more into metal, but at the time thought it was more often than not for image than true appreciation.

7 Dave Smith February 10, 2016 at 1:12 pm

Dream Theater is some of the most sophisticated, uplifting music in existence.

8 Todd Kreider February 10, 2016 at 11:08 pm

You should try more classical.

In the rock world, DT up to 1999, maybe 2002.

9 V D February 10, 2016 at 1:13 pm

#1. Or, intelligent kids who are emotionally disturbed or on the asd like heavy metal. Intelligent kids who are emotionally healthy do not like heavy metal

10 Norman Pfyster February 10, 2016 at 3:43 pm

Eh, I was intelligent and emotionally healthy as a kid. I just liked it heavy.

11 cheesetrader February 10, 2016 at 4:37 pm

word – 80s pop music sucked – metal was where it was at

12 TheAJ February 10, 2016 at 1:17 pm

Re: (1). Up The Irons!

13 josh February 10, 2016 at 2:30 pm

“A few years ago a study found that kids with the highest IQs are disproportionatelyattracted to heavy metal.”

Lol. Its almost as high as the IQ of kids into K-Pop!

14 PD Shaw February 10, 2016 at 2:56 pm

This appears to be the study:

“The researchers surveyed 1,057 members of the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth – a body whose 120,000 student members are within the top five per cent academically in the 11-19 age range.

“Asked for their favourite type of music, 39 per cent said rock, 18 per cent R&B and 14 per cent pop. Six per cent said heavy metal and a third rated it in their top five genres.

“The heavy metal fans in the study had lower self-esteem and more difficulties in family relationships and friendships.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/3352230/Heavy-metal-a-comfort-for-the-bright-child.html

Perhaps metal-heads are particularly smart, but suffer an inner-ear disturbance that prevents them from properly assessing studies.

15 John February 10, 2016 at 10:16 pm

*whoosh*

16 Jim B February 10, 2016 at 2:38 pm

#7, Does that ruling answer the question of where liability falls?

17 Dan Weber February 11, 2016 at 10:41 am

Pretty clearly on the self-driving system, which is the driver.

18 Jim B February 11, 2016 at 10:49 am

That’s how I read it, just wondering. So when there is an accident, Google gets sued and pays out (unless they can prove that the human passenger interfered or the car manufacturer had a defective integration)?

19 AndyK February 10, 2016 at 3:29 pm

1. Iron Maiden had a song ‘Sign of the Cross’ which referenced ‘the name of the rose’. It led me, in middle school, to read the Umberto Eco novel of the same name, and then explore the rest of Eco’s catalogue.

20 Chip February 10, 2016 at 6:12 pm

They also had songs that referenced Frank Herbert’s Dune (he refused permission to name the song Dune) and Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

My best friend and I were both in the high school honours program but were rebellious. It was both an expression and an outlet.

21 JWatts February 10, 2016 at 6:29 pm

And Led Zeppelin had extensive references to The Lord of the Rings, of course.

22 anon February 10, 2016 at 11:46 pm

The black metal band Summoning exclusively writes songs about LOTR

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HipoikwHRb8

23 Chip February 11, 2016 at 1:14 am

Iron Maiden’s lead singer has a commercial pilot’s license and often flies the plane when touring.

24 Capt. J Parker February 10, 2016 at 3:33 pm

“It’s probably every parent’s worst nightmare, especially parents of the generation mine came from. This was dumb people music to them. It was ridiculous, ugly, and only a few short steps from tattoos, drugs, long hair and dropping out of school.”
Gee wiz Beaver. I never imagined that someone who discovered metal in 2000 could have had parents that were born in 1920.

25 chuck martel February 10, 2016 at 4:03 pm

7. Does this mean that eventually an automobile owner, if there will be private owners, will no longer need a driver’s license? If so, how will they be able to buy cigarettes and beer when the Google-driven car stops at Circle K? Will they be able to drink and ride? If consumption of alcohol while riding in the guided car becomes legal, what will state and local governments do to replace the the fines they will no longer collect?

26 Steve J February 10, 2016 at 5:19 pm

I predict booming business in tow trucks that will still have steering wheels.

27 Brian Donohue February 10, 2016 at 4:08 pm

#3 was good.

28 Brian Donohue February 10, 2016 at 4:08 pm

Check that- #4 was good.

29 Lord Action February 10, 2016 at 5:15 pm

Based on the url, I was expecting a 40 foot rabbit.

30 Ryan McKean February 10, 2016 at 6:20 pm

Thank you for turning me on to Ryan Holiday.

31 Ricardo February 10, 2016 at 9:18 pm

#3: “If visa-free travel is a proxy for good international relations, then what does it reveal about the geopolitical architecture of the planet?”

It obviously is not, though. The U.S. is quite transparent about the fact, for instance, that countries are eligible to participate in its visa-waiver program if and only if they are rich countries with low rates of visa violations. Israel does not make the cut, for instance, despite strong relations between the U.S. and Israel.

32 ohwilleke February 10, 2016 at 11:25 pm

6) Everyone knows that the arrival of humans in Australia led to widespread megafauna extinctions of the native animals, particularly large marsupials and large flightless birds. What far fewer people know is that this extinction appears to be related in part to the widespread increase in wildfire incidence upon the arrival of humans to the continent, possibly as a crude means of herding animals towards hunters who would kill them as they tried to escape, or of killing animals who are serious threats that conventional attacks with spears weren’t very effective against. (Or, maybe the humans were just lazy and failed to put out their campfires because they didn’t have Smokey the Bear to tell them otherwise, but this seems like a less likely hypothesis.)

33 Ricardo February 11, 2016 at 12:35 am

Cite? It sounds plausible but then any evidence from 50,000 years ago is going to be spotty at best and it seems like an unnecessary factor to explain a fairly straightforward phenomenon. We know from very recent history that humans are perfectly capable of hunting animals such as whales, North American passenger pidgeons or buffalo nearly or completely to extinction.

34 Patrick M February 11, 2016 at 12:01 pm

I loved the first artice, especially since Brave New World is also one of my favorite metal albums. I also think it’s Iron Maiden’s best album. *ducks tomatoes*

35 whatsthat February 11, 2016 at 3:27 pm

#1: yet another article about heavy metal being good, without any mention of the music. Some of us just like it heavy…which is why – if you actually bother to look at the music – early Iron Maiden/Metallica are not very distinguishable from punk, and I’m betting if they stayed that way they wouldn’t have been half as popular. Take a look at some of the 70s glam bands, or some of the heavier passages from the prog bands or the later punk scene or Hendrix or even the Beatles’ Back in the USSR: the difference between these and heavy metal (as made by the more popular/good bands – heavy metal is a little different from most other genres in that the more popular bands are actually the better ones because at least post 1990 it hasn’t received much support from the radio) is not very large.

Where they differ is that they bother to learn their instruments. So the songs become more riff intensive, changing tempo/keys and melodies within the same overall “architecture” , often with underlying melodies to go with the main ones.

In Iron Maiden’s case, lately, this has been a problem: the average level of musicianship is high but they seem to have forgotten how to rock and roll. But I agree, Brave New World was a really good album. So was the follow up. After that, hmmm…

If you’re listening to metal for the lyrics, umm, you’re doing it wrong. Read some poetry, or some Ogden Nash if lyrical inventiveness is your thing. “We are motorhead and we play rock and roll!”

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