Monday assorted links

by on September 12, 2016 at 1:48 pm in Uncategorized | Permalink

1 Ray Lopez September 12, 2016 at 1:50 pm

No comments? A treasure trove of links.

2 Ray Lopez September 12, 2016 at 1:58 pm

#5 – chess as a 3D spectator sport – “Merenzon said the long-term aim is to change the way chess is monetized, by offering a more engaged global audience.” – well, maybe. I sponsor chess at times at the local level, and it’s true there needs to be more money in the art/sport than just rich guys sponsoring. I think gambling on the next move to be played might be the way to go, with a prize fund to the player the gets most/many of the moves, and/or the next move right. It’s not as easy as just asking a computer to pick a move, since humans make mistakes. That’s one idea. Another is to allow betting on who wins, more so than now (it’s hard to find an online gambling site for chess, a few do spring up from time to time).

3 IVV September 12, 2016 at 2:32 pm

Time of post: 1:48 pm

Time of Ray’s comment: 1:50 pm

The answer is clear. “No comments?” You’d hope we’d actually read a link before commenting on it, wouldn’t you?

4 msgkings September 12, 2016 at 5:55 pm

As I said, with you here to remind me how can I not realize the obvious superiority of Trump?

5 Urso September 12, 2016 at 6:57 pm

Have you also been convinced to move to an Asian island nation with a girlfriend half (yes, half!) your age?

6 Ted Craig September 12, 2016 at 1:58 pm

7. Once again I’m reminded that “what the smart people are reading” is usually just a reflection of person taste.

7 Richard September 12, 2016 at 2:05 pm

#1 — My sister was stung by a bee on her eye when she was about five years old. The eye doesn’t appear on the charts in the article, but from her screams, my estimate is that it has a pain score of 10 out of 10.

8 michael September 12, 2016 at 4:49 pm

if you read the article, you’d see the experimenter was warned against trying the eye, for fear of blindness.

Did your sister experience any permanent impairment of vision?

9 Alan September 12, 2016 at 8:32 pm

My son got stung on his eyelid when he was about 5 YO. Many screams at a volume theretofore unknown in my family. Not the eye though (Thank Evolution).

10 liberalarts September 12, 2016 at 10:02 pm

I haven’t been stung that many times, but I have had 2 of the worst:
1. Stung on the tongue with a bee that crept into a Coke. Very, very uncomfortable for several hours. Not sure of what kind of bee, but the sort that might hang around a picnic lunch in the north of Europe.
2. Stung on the eye or so close that I couldn’t tell the difference. No stinger found, so it might have been a yellow jacket, but I never exactly saw what got me. This did not impair my vision permanently, but essentially took me out for the day. My neighbor is a family practice doc, and after it swelled up immediately (in less than one minute, and I am not even allergic to stings), he recommended that shake powdered meat tenderizer on it. One of my other neighbors actually had that in stock, I shook it all over the area and it did in fact help. This was significantly worse than once when I got stung 10 times by wasps while retrieving a golf ball.

11 Richard September 13, 2016 at 1:28 pm

My sister’s sting was on the eye itself — it apparently was the instinctual closing of the eyelid, milliseconds too late, that caused the bee to feel trapped and defend itself. Certainly there was temporary loss of sight, as swelling completely shut the eye within a minute. Mercifully, no permanent physical damage, though psychology is another matter. She still has nightmares about it 30 years later. Definitely NOT recommended.

12 Millian September 12, 2016 at 2:18 pm

7. Good for J.D. Vance and Yuval Levin.

13 Placebo September 12, 2016 at 4:50 pm

“Hey J.D., I just wrote a book. Want to read it?”
“Sure, I’ll read it as long as you read mine.”

14 Unmarketable skills September 12, 2016 at 2:27 pm

#6 Depending on which country you’re viewing it from apparently…

15 Andao September 12, 2016 at 3:42 pm

Yep, Google maps always adjusts borders and such depending on which country you’re in

16 MyTyrone September 12, 2016 at 2:44 pm

On #4 is this the very reason that people use mechanisms to reduce their cash and access to their wealth. That is that they do not want to happy now because the unhappiness will keep them striving for more wealth.

I was once talking to friend about his net worth and he kept saying “I do not count that” I said “but you have to count it it is part of your net worth”, “No I don’t count that” he said. He was trying to avoid complacency.

17 Bob from Ohio September 12, 2016 at 2:49 pm

#7 What a sad list. Both the “Politico 50′ and the listed books.

18 Heorogar September 13, 2016 at 8:25 am

Truth. One word comes to mind: “banal.”

I was shocked to see no one read Illary’s “No Lifetime Achievement,” the shortest book in the World.

19 Jeff R. September 12, 2016 at 3:17 pm

1. A tarantula hawk wasp? That sounds like a bad DM cooked up for a Dungeons & Dragons campaign. Roll a saving through of 17 or lose 6 HP and your THAC0 drops by 2.

20 Jeff R. September 12, 2016 at 3:21 pm

sounds like something a bad DM cooked up

21 rabidwombat September 12, 2016 at 3:30 pm

THAC0 sounds like something a bad game designer cooked up.

22 Urso September 12, 2016 at 3:45 pm

Gird yourselves adventurers – a pack of rabid wombats has appeared!

23 Corporal Obvious September 12, 2016 at 9:18 pm

Mortal Wombat: Armor Class 2 (+1 size, +1 natural armor, -10 for the Mortal Wombat does not dodge.) Hit Points 109 Attacks: Burrow into person +10 Damage: Too disgusting to even put numbers to. Fort +12 Reflex -4 Will: Indomitable
Special Abilities: Displacement – Where the Mortal Wombat wishes to go it will go, regardless of physical barriers.
Spanish Mortal Wombats have +10 to stealth.
Excretes 6 sided dice for extra combat damage.

24 rayward September 12, 2016 at 3:40 pm

4. Real estate developers are the exception to the rule (the preference for cash). Why? They buy real estate (on credit), move some dirt around, get an appraisal that supports a value higher than the price paid (i.e., “equity”), and then use the real estate as collateral for another loan in the amount of the “equity”. The developer’s creed: a dollar borrowed is a dollar eared; a loan refinanced is a dollar saved; and a dollar repaid on a loan is a dollar lost forever. We may have one living in the White House next year.

25 rayward September 12, 2016 at 3:44 pm

Earned not eared.

26 Mark Thorson September 12, 2016 at 4:10 pm

Oh whoa! Thanks for the correction! I never would have figured that out! I was thinking of something like what you do to tag the ears of farm animals.

27 Dmitri Helios September 12, 2016 at 8:10 pm

LOL

28 TMC September 12, 2016 at 3:59 pm

It would be nice to have someone who has actually built something.

29 Pshrnk September 12, 2016 at 4:08 pm

“It would be nice to have someone who has actually built something.”

How many nails has Trump pounded? How many walls has he painted? How much concrete has he poured?

30 Thiago Ribeiro September 12, 2016 at 4:24 pm

“The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind. The answer is blowin’ in the wind.”

31 Anon September 12, 2016 at 7:10 pm

Who needs concrete proposals when you can “Make America Great Wall “?

32 Thor September 12, 2016 at 7:52 pm

Surely it is not a concrete proposal, it’s a modest proposal.

33 JasonL September 12, 2016 at 3:42 pm

#3 – As a guy who would prefer less clutter married to a person whose habits make decluttering very difficult, I would submit that while full konmarification is probably too radical for a median range of preferences, there is something pro social about trying to keep clutter constrained somewhat. What I find in this mixed preference arrangement is that entropy facilitates clutter expansion while my wife’s requirement that every single piece of paper be read before disposal doubles the effort involved in decluttering, with the result being her preference set completely dominates the square footage of the house. We are not talking hoarder levels of clutter here, but boxes of stuff in the basement plus a tendency of small piles to accumulate until I can’t stand it. Long story short, if it is just you with clutter, decluttering may never be worth it, but in a two or three body problem (as in a spouse plus visitors), you may find that that preference for clutter dominates other preferences to an unreasonable extent.

34 Urso September 12, 2016 at 3:47 pm

I think that people (specifically the SWPL set) likes talking about Marie Kondo more than they like following her advice. It sounds nice to be Buddha, but no one wants to do what it takes to get there

35 stephan September 12, 2016 at 3:54 pm

#3 He has a point for digital stuff, use the search engines. For pictures, since I often take 500+ pictures on a day outing ( i use continuous shooting on my DSLR a lot), I still delete a whole bunch in Lightroom (Adobe software),since most of them I’ll never want ( nor have time) to see again. Google can read he exif data, Lightroom can also add key words. so they’re easy to find.
For the physical world, the search engine is your brain. I think it’s pretty individual, I don’t like to own too much stuff, I like a living space clean and uncluttered. II don’t think it takes a lot of time to keep things tidy.

36 Red Rackham September 12, 2016 at 4:04 pm

#4 The joy of cash is more rational than one might think: our perception of wealth was created when we were kids, at a time when the only wealth we knew was in the form of banknotes and coins. I would add that I still feel elated when I have a comfortable amount of cash hidden on myself, although paradoxically I’m not much interested in money in general. I also agree that giving away money (especially in big bills, which we have in Europe) is much more rewarding than spending it on oneself.

37 Thiago Ribeiro September 12, 2016 at 4:04 pm

My left foot was stung by a bee last Friday and I am happy to report that it hurt much less than I feared when I saw those big bees.

38 Thor September 12, 2016 at 7:55 pm

It was probably one of those Amazonian ones, wispy as Neymar. Wait ’til you come up north and try being stung by a real American bee speciman: they are like Hulk.

39 Alan September 12, 2016 at 8:36 pm

American bees are the best bees. They are great, I tell ya. In fact, I’ll get those big ole american bees to go down south and kick some a$$. It’ll be huge!

40 Thiago Ribeiro September 12, 2016 at 8:36 pm

You must remember the 1960s Military Regime allowed African bees escape from a lab and mix with the native ones. Our bees are the most powerful ones.

41 Aaron September 12, 2016 at 5:54 pm

3 and 4. Clutter isn’t cash. Cash buys clutter. Life is suffering. Thank you for putting those links next door.

42 Oli Cairns September 12, 2016 at 6:11 pm

5) they banned the broadcasting of the game live by 3rd parties. Their coverage will inevitably be inferior to best online analysis sites and commentators

43 George Selgin September 12, 2016 at 10:35 pm

#1. Before I opened the link I said to myself “tongue!” And that’s based on experience. NB: check pastry as well as soda cans for yellow jackets before each bite or swig.

44 Ouch September 13, 2016 at 2:21 am

I was once stung on the knuckle. Oh man, that hurt. It bloated up, and there’s not enough skin to really let that happen easily.

45 Axa September 13, 2016 at 7:38 am

#6: the line only appears on maps.google.cn , maps.google.com shows something different. As long as business is possible, put whatever the client wants in the map.

46 Econchic September 13, 2016 at 11:33 am

#4 is not only very intuitive, but I would say it really goes well with the argument TC had with Noah Smith. Your employment outlook is dire, and you have some significant debt (student loan, duh). Why not spend the day online (video games, MR comments, etc) and then do some odd jobs for cash. You feel both entertained and rich enough. Good luck trying to convince us we will feel better paying off the debt!

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