Public Choice Outreach Conference!

by on March 19, 2017 at 5:14 am in Uncategorized | Permalink

The annual Public Choice Outreach Conference is June 16-18th, at the Hyatt Arlington in Rosslyn, VA! Submit an application and please do encourage your students to apply. Here’s some more information.

What is the Public Choice Outreach Conference?
The Public Choice Outreach Conference is a compact lecture series designed as a “crash course” in Public Choice for students planning careers in academia, journalism, law, or public policy. Graduate students and advanced undergraduates are eligible to apply. Many past participants of the Outreach seminar have gone on to notable careers in academia, law and business.

Who can apply?
Graduate students and advanced undergraduates are eligible to apply. Students majoring in economics, history, international studies, law, philosophy political science, psychology, public administration, religious studies, and sociology have attended past conferences. Advanced degree students with a demonstrated interest in political economy or demonstrated interest in political economy are invited to apply. Applicants unfamiliar with Public Choice and students from outside of George Mason University are especially encouraged. Download a 2017 application here.

What are the fees involved?
Outreach has no conference fee – it is free to attend. Room and meals are included for all participants. However, ALL travel costs are the responsibility of the participants.

If you have any questions please contact:
Lisa Hill-Corley, Outreach Conference Coordinator
(703) 993-2316
email: lhillcor <at> gmu <dot> edu

1 Bill March 19, 2017 at 7:51 am

You should open the conference with the following joke from a critic:

“The absurdity of public-choice theory is captured by Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen in the following little scenario: “Can you direct me to the railway station?” asks the stranger. “Certainly,” says the local, pointing in the opposite direction, towards the post office, “and would you post this letter for me on your way?” “Certainly,” says the stranger, resolving to open it to see if it contains anything worth stealing.”

Who subsidizes the rooms and meals, and what do they expect to get in exchange?

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2 rayward March 19, 2017 at 8:00 am

How does public choice work when the main political actors lie, when they say one thing but mean something very different? Meanwhile, China moves into the next phase of globalization and trade (in which China produces goods for China firms – not western firms – to compete with goods made by western firms including goods made in China for western firms), as western firms look on with fear and trepidation and look to cooperative western governments to restrict the sale of such competing goods in their countries even if or because the demand for those goods might exceed the demand for their own goods. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/19/business/china-trade-manufacturing-miao-wei.html?ref=business Public choice, it depends on the meaning of “public” and “choice”.

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3 rayward March 19, 2017 at 8:25 am

No, I’m not ridiculing public choice, I’m ridiculing how it is applied. “Can you direct me to the railway station?” asks the stranger. “Certainly,” says the local, pointing in the opposite direction, towards the post office, “and would you post this letter for me on your way?” “Certainly,” says the stranger, resolving to open it to see if it contains anything worth stealing. When western (read American) firms shifted production to China, did it not occur to them that, after developing the industrial capacity and technological know-how, it would be in China’s interest to produce goods for China firms and not just for American firms? It occurred to the Obama administration: TPP was intended to facilitate the shift of production from China to Vietnam and other Asian countries. And it occurred to China: high speed rail connecting China with Vietnam and other countries to the south along with expansion of China’s territorial waters in the South China Sea. Meanwhile, America’s public choice is to threaten China and send the Pacific fleet to the area, as America’s intellectual class debates the inefficiency of government spending.

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4 rayward March 19, 2017 at 8:54 am

America’s trade deals have been subject to much criticism of late, especially with regard to China. Prior trade deals were brilliant in their simplicity: America would build a military base in a country with a cooperative government to protect the cooperative government from insurrection, mostly the threat from the left but also from the right, in return for which America got whatever it wanted. More recent trade deals were based more on trade theory and less on military power. As I understand what Trump prefers, he would return to the simpler trade model, the one based on military power. As indicated, it has the advantage of simplicity. But having seen the enormous benefits of the model based on trade theory, what countries would prefer the old model based on military power? That’s right, countries with the least popular, or most oppressive, governments. Public choice. It’s yours.

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5 dearieme March 19, 2017 at 8:56 am

“What is the Public Choice Outreach Conference? The Public Choice Outreach Conference is …” Who wrote that? When will they master pronouns?

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6 cassella March 19, 2017 at 9:54 am

Public Choice Theory is an interesting topic and “conferences” are just normal academic ritual.; however, “outreach” efforts are political, not academic. Organizers here can not state the true purpose of the conference, of course. Charades are so much fun.

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