Tuesday assorted links

by on May 16, 2017 at 2:26 pm in Uncategorized | Permalink

1 Rich Berger May 16, 2017 at 3:10 pm

2. It seems like this guy gets all his recognition from the left

Reply

2 Dick the Butcher May 16, 2017 at 3:36 pm

I am Richard Spencer.

Reply

3 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 4:24 pm

Before you decide to adopt a political label as your own, it’s really a good idea to find out what sort of people you’re going to be associating yourself with when you do so. Because you should pretty much expect your political opponents to try to associate you with the worst sort of people who are using that same label.

Reply

4 Doug May 16, 2017 at 6:58 pm

Richard Spencer’s about the same ideological distance to Hitler as Bernie Sanders does to Stalin. That is to say, not extensive, but still far too much for my taste. A drop of sewage ruins a barrel of wine.

But I think it reveals the sheer hypocrisy of the intelligentsia’s left-right asymmetry. I think that’s what pisses off so many people, and causes them to reflexively defend Spencer. A man who’s decidedly not worth defending. Spencer is routinely labeled a “neo-nazi” without evidence or even consideration. Whereas Sanders is treated so adoringly, that he’s now the most popular politician in America.

A la Moldbug, The “Brown Scare” has almost certainly claimed several orders of magnitude more scalps than the “Red Scare”.

Reply

5 Art Deco May 16, 2017 at 7:59 pm

A la Moldbug, The “Brown Scare” has almost certainly claimed several orders of magnitude more scalps than the “Red Scare”.

The Communist Party in 1947 had 100,000 members, was influential in 12 trade unions, and had a three digit population of agents in the federal government (and had suborned three subcabinet officers). OTOH, we have Richard Spencer, who is 38 years old and not self-supporting. The Brown scare cannot claim any scalps, because there are no Brown scalps to claim. The scalps which have been claimed are common and garden Catholics and Evangelicals who decline to genuflect to Big Gay and common and garden academics who recognize the diversity blather for the humbug that it is. But they’re just contemptible puppies and and ‘accept the moral framework of the left’. Or something like that.

Reply

6 Mondfledermaus May 16, 2017 at 3:17 pm

6. What about the football coach?

Reply

7 drunk on rossini May 16, 2017 at 3:26 pm

Anecdata:

As an opera fan and someone who regularly attends fewer-frills productions in Brooklyn and other outer boroughs, I’d like to submit that the interest in opera is probably declining, but not as fast as people’s interest in spending $150+ for tickets. Demographics are changing. Perhaps there’s less status to be gained for the wealthy elites to patronize the arts. They’re too busy spending money on the likes of Jeff Koons. But people without gobs of money to spend are still interested in real art, including opera – young professionals and the like. Rush tickets for the Met sell out the minute they become available at 12:00 pm – I’d know, I’ve never gotten lucky enough to snag one for myself, despite manically refreshing my browser.

The interest to enjoy opera is there. Off-Met productions routinely sell out tickets weeks, if not months, before curtain. Most of the people at those productions are under 40. Sure, they’ll pay $1200 for a railroad apartment in Bed-Stuy, but they don’t want to pay hundreds of dollars to see Puccini at the Met when they can spend $30 to see him elsewhere. The production value at companies like LoftOpera is top notch, as the Times has itself noticed in recent reviews. The choice between paying through the nose for a stuffy, black-tie affair in the wasteland of Central Park West and for cheap tickets in a warehouse in Bushwick, where you can swill beer as you watch Verdi, is a no-brainer.

Reply

8 dearieme May 16, 2017 at 3:52 pm

For $1200 you could have a lovely weekend in Berlin with a couple of opera performances thrown in.

Reply

9 dearieme May 16, 2017 at 5:38 pm

Not to mention I’ve long been an aficionado of the Skin flute so I do enjoy seeing the Berlin Philhomonic at work

Reply

10 Stormy Dragon May 16, 2017 at 10:36 pm

The Met streams live broadcasts of their performances to movie theaters:

http://www.metopera.org/Season/In-Cinemas/

The showings in my area always seem well attended.

Reply

11 Thiago Ribeiro May 16, 2017 at 3:28 pm

“Did China stop a North Korean nuclear test? If so, that is more important than much of what you are reading about!” Including articles about someone paying women to play videogame with him and that US hedge fund providing whole-body cryopreservarion as job benefit?

Reply

12 The Other Jim May 16, 2017 at 4:38 pm

Zing!

Reply

13 WC Varones May 16, 2017 at 3:28 pm

2. Spencer’s views are abhorrent, and similar to politically fashionable identity politics on the left.

Reply

14 anon May 16, 2017 at 4:02 pm

i think you meant “spencer’s views are abhorrent, BUT similar to politically fashionable identity politics on the left”.

political rhetoric and strategies are moving in an distasteful direction, but what can be done about it? unless there’s a gentleman’s agreement to knock it off, it’s only going to get worse. *much* worse.

Reply

15 Dick the Butcher May 16, 2017 at 4:08 pm

The left is evolving tactics from running around and screeching to intimidation and violence.

Reply

16 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 4:27 pm

I despise identity politics,
But at least identity politics defends the interests of relatively oppressed minorities rather than already privileged majorities.

Reply

17 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 4:53 pm

It’s the future you chose. Multiculturalism inevitably ends up with the former majority perforce adopting the identity politics of their ethno-cultural rivals.

Also your comment, with its phrasing of “oppression” and “privilege” illustrates how conservatives and libertarians accept the terminology and moral framing of the Left. This is why conservatism and libertarianism are failed ideologies incapable of immanentizing their ideals.

Reply

18 Anonymous May 16, 2017 at 6:40 pm

Your boy lives in his mom’s spare vacation home in Montana.

Reply

19 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 7:01 pm

Where did I mention Spencer, and how does your pointless comment deconstruct anything I wrote?

Are all your liberal friends as dim as you?

20 Anonymous May 16, 2017 at 8:42 pm

“the former majority perforce adopting the identity politics of their ethno-cultural rivals”

Woe, the former majority, crying themselves to sleep in Montana resort homes.

21 Antander May 16, 2017 at 10:30 pm

“Your boy lives in his mom’s spare vacation home in Montana.”

Not true and not relevant.

22 Anonymous May 16, 2017 at 11:18 pm

“In 2011, he moved from Washington to Whitefish, Montana, where his mother owns a vacation home .. its 2015 IRS filing shows that Spencer drew just $13,275 in salary”

Rich slacker, poser.

23 Antander May 17, 2017 at 12:07 am

The article itself states Spencer lives in an apartment in Washington. Go away shill.

24 Anonymous May 17, 2017 at 10:24 am

Does the cotton money pay for that too?

25 Art Deco May 16, 2017 at 7:51 pm

Also your comment, with its phrasing of “oppression” and “privilege” illustrates how conservatives and libertarians accept the terminology and moral framing of the Left.

Dame’s an abrasive advocate of open borders and kinky sex. Can you leave the rest of us out of it?

Reply

26 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 10:10 pm

Your conservative ideology is impotent because it accepts the Left’s moral framing. Racial/ethnic discrimination is a prime example. Conservatives, I am told, believe in free markets, which should be quite up to the task of handling businesses which refuse to accept greenbacks from minority out-groups. But no conservative who wants to remain gainfully employed can touch Title VII, so they accept the Left’s moral framing: discrimination for certain immutable characteristics is wrong ab initio instead of the logically consistent position, that property is an inherent and inalienable right or it’s just a license from the State. Of course, then the Left moves the dial to sexual preference and conservatives scramble to catch up. Caitlyn Jenner votes Republican, after all.

More generally, conservatives believe they are in an ideological debate over universalist principles, which is again an Enlightenment, liberal-Left framing. The operational rules to advance conservative principles appear far more prosaic: if you want to keep government small you need to keep the tax base small–no written constitution will suffice; if you want to keep citizens future-oriented and family-centered, you need to make family formation affordable, and that means keeping land cheap and labor dear.

Libertarians have the same issues. When you have a whole frontier that people can escape too so they can ignore the government, it’s easy to be libertarian. But the frontier closed in 1890 so now what? The other issue they backflip around is IQ. Appreciating an opposing viewpoint requires a certain IQ level. Empathy requires a certain IQ level. Impulse control requires a certain IQ level. Lacking this threshold, large swathes of the population are incapable of self-governance. They will either starve or take up banditry, and there goes your libertarian utopia.

27 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 11:07 pm

Your worldview is sad and pitable. At best, an endless future in which humanity is irrevocably divided into separate races that can never really coexist. You really want to live in that future? What do you want, white nationalism in a separate whites-only state? Permanent subjugation of “inferior” races? Eventual genetic extermination? What is your endpoint?

Whether you like it or not, all these other people exist on the planet and we have to get along with them. They aren’t going anywhere, and we’re not killing them all, we’re not enslaving them. Go curse God that he invented black people and Hispanics and ploped them down in our neighborhood, but deal with the fact as it is and stop living in the whites only fantasy universe in your head.

28 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 11:26 pm

It’s a testament to your myopic American Whiggism that you can only think about this issue in terms of whites vs. blacks and, since around the 1980’s, whites vs. blacks and Hispanics.

Of course, Hispanics ethnically cleanse neighborhoods of blacks. “Hispanic” itself is a prolapsed category, given the civil war smoldering between Iberians and indigenous throughout Central America. Jews absolutely detest Lebanese and Syrians and vice versa, and Turks hate Kurds, and Greeks and Armenians hate Turks. The Cypriot Green Line remains firmly in place. The Tibetans are engaged in a (losing) battle with the Han against ethnic and cultural extinction. The Japanese and Koreans remain stubbornly resistant to accepting “refugees” from all those parts of the world that are, as usual, failing, as are the Hungarians and the Poles. “Yugoslavia” split up some time ago, as did “Czechoslovakia” and the kingdoms of Norway and Sweden. And why do artificial entities like Belgium even exist other than to trigger World Wars?

I’m a freaking hippy compared to most of the world. Grow up.

29 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 11:28 pm

tag closed.

30 Greig May 17, 2017 at 12:14 am

“At best, an endless future in which humanity is irrevocably divided into separate races that can never really coexist.”

Better than sticking your hands in your ears and denying human nature. COMMUNISM WORKS I WANT TO BELIEVE! No it doesn’t, and neither does the mixing of highly divergent races. The mixing of the race leads at best to a Brazil-like situation, an uneasy type of harmony, but also rampant poverty, the root of which is the blood of the low-IQ races mixed into the pool. And at worst, you get South Africa, full of ethnic conflict and hatred.

31 So Much For Subtlety May 17, 2017 at 4:48 am

Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 11:07 pm

At best, an endless future in which humanity is irrevocably divided into separate races that can never really coexist.

It is not up to you and me whether this is our future or not. It only takes one side to insist on racial hatred for there to be racial hatred. I think White people have given up on racism. No one else has. So as long as everyone else hates you because you are White, and they do, this is the world in which we live and there is very little we can do to change it. God knows people have tried.

Whether you like it or not, all these other people exist on the planet and we have to get along with them. They aren’t going anywhere

Actually they are going somewhere. They are moving here. There is no reason why we need to accept that.

32 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 8:46 am

Your conservative ideology is impotent because it accepts the Left’s moral framing.

It does nothing of the kind. You’d learn more by actually listening to people.

33 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 8:49 am

Of course, Hispanics ethnically cleanse neighborhoods of blacks.

No, the process of people moving in and moving out results in ethnic clustering. It doesn’t require much inter-ethnic antagonism or any planning. Some mild preferences about who’d you’d prefer to have as a neighbor will do the trick. You’ve been paying to much attention to Steve Sailer.

34 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 9:01 am

Jews absolutely detest Lebanese and Syrians and vice versa,

Jews have had for 60-edd a workable modus vivendi with Arabs living with them, the Druze in particular. I doubt you’d find much evidence examining an Israeli population that they ‘detest’ Lebanese, nor, if you examined a Maronite or Melkite population, that the Lebanese uniformly detest the Jews.

35 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 12:50 pm

I love kinky sex. Especially the kind involving Catholic priests.

36 Hazel Meade May 17, 2017 at 1:13 pm

I’m a freaking hippy compared to most of the world. Grow up.

One would think it would be a point of pride that Western culture is more advanced on the matter of race, but noooo…. hey look the Turks hate the Kurds, so it’s ok for white people to hate black people and Hispanics! Everybody does it!

What sort of world do you want to live in ? You say that white people should be free to discriminate against blacks, and I don’t disagree. But I think we need to suppress societal racism through some other mechanism then. It’s either anti-discrimination laws or political correctness, take your pick.
Because what’s the alternative? Black people just shut up and take it? And whose going to make them? Are we going to have heavily policed black neighborhoods to make sure that black people don’t get uppity and start demanding to be allowed in restaurants? Whose going to make sure that black people accept their place as second class citizens in a society where whites feel free to be total assholes to them as much as they want?
I used to think that racism was so marginalized that only like 3 hicks in rural Mississippi would actually refuse to serve black people, but since the alt-right crawled out of the woodwork, I know better. And people like you hate PC just as much as anti-discrimination laws, which is a massive contradiction. Apparently you think it should be social acceptable to discriminate against blacks, but not socially acceptable to be intolerant of racists. Whites should feel free to walk around being as racist as they want without experiencing any social sanctions, but black people have to accept being discriminated against for walking around with black skin on.

37 Hazel Meade May 17, 2017 at 3:04 pm

It only takes one side to insist on racial hatred for there to be racial hatred. I think White people have given up on racism.

Really? You have noticed the people commenting, in this very thread, about the inferiority of blacks and Hispanics, have you not?
Racism doesn’t exist? Maybe black people’s experiences are not what you assume they are. Maybe they aren’t just making it all up, about the amount of racial animosity they have to deal with.

38 Nobody May 16, 2017 at 8:19 pm

Ironically, race privilege is a concept primarily used as a political weapon by more privileged elite whites against their relatively impoverished redneck rivals. The narrative is used to bring minorities into a voting coalition led by elite whites against the rednecks. But it is never decomposed to a more granular level, which whites are privileged?, because that doesn’t serve the interests of those who control the discourse.

Reply

39 Ricardo May 17, 2017 at 6:30 am

“The narrative is used to bring minorities into a voting coalition led by elite whites against the rednecks.”

Whites who earn less than $40,000 per year split their votes just about evenly between Republicans and Democrats. For the nth time, not every white person who lacks a college degree is “working class” or a “relatively impoverished redneck” and not everyone who has some college education is automatically free from periods of economic hardship.

40 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 9:05 am

Whites who earn less than $40,000 per year split their votes just about evenly between Republicans and Democrats.

It’s unusual to find demographic subsets which are uniform in their opinions. However, I suspect if you drill down, you’ll discover the Democratic voters are largely single women and divorcees, esp. single mothers and that the men are largely unmarried and / or had a long spell of unemployment at some point in their past.

41 Hazel Meade May 17, 2017 at 1:19 pm

the men are largely unmarried and / or had a long spell of unemployment at some point in their past.

That probably describes your average Trump voter pretty well. Not that you”re wrong – Trump pretty much stole the Democrat’s working class labor vote.

42 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 2:32 pm

That probably describes your average Trump voter pretty well. Not that you”re wrong – Trump pretty much stole the Democrat’s working class labor vote.

No, Hazel. Having a long spell of unemployment in your past is correlated with voting Democratic. The ‘working class labor vote’ has been gradually deserting the Democratic Party for 50 years.

43 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 10:53 pm

I didn’t until the alt-right appeared, and it became abundantly clear that the left was quite correct about “white privilege”. Trump and the alt-right are literally white privilege asserting itself. White people have the political power to bring the forces of the state to bear to bend the rules in their favor in a way that no other ethnic group can.
For example, working class white people get protections from foreign trade and immigration. Black people get welfare reform.White people literally go to the polls and vote themselves advantages in the market. If that’s not white privilege, I don’t know what is.

Reply

44 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 11:42 pm

Let’s accept 100% of your premises as true: white achievement is due solely to “privilege,” so minority ethnics have ample justification for their hatred and resentment of whites, and the enlightened whites hate the troglodyte half of whites and wish they were dead.

Your fanciful, multicultural utopia ends in tears.

45 Potato May 16, 2017 at 11:44 pm

Alt right loons are just that: loons. Outside of the interwebs they are functionally nonexistent. There’s no “alt right” party. There’s an out of touch limousine liberal white party married to blacks/hispanics as a voter base (funny how those “tax the rich” cries never touch the mortgage deduction or couples making 150k a year). That would be ghastly. And there’s a party of old white men who complain about gays doing gay things, taxes (but Medicare should be increased!) and the outrage de jour (Obama not saluting, CSU SB declaring the American flag to be verboten on campus due to white privilege, Spanish on tv, etc.)

White people are not a bloc. That’s hilariously stupid. There’s an educated/nonprofit and minorities block, and an uneducated/educated but works in for profit sector and old people group.

White people dont vote themselves privilege in the market, except in the past through segregation and racist union laws.

Take a few breaths. The “alt right” are a boogeyman. Some thousands of losers, living in their parents’ houses, with no career and no women. Sound and fury, signifying nothing.

46 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 11:50 pm

My intellectual movement succeeded in electing Trump as President, against the wishes of all the liberals and Establishment-conservatives out there. What did your intellectual movement do?

47 Greig May 17, 2017 at 12:22 am

“For example, working class white people get protections from foreign trade and immigration. Black people get welfare reform.”

No, working class people who work get protections from foreign trade and immigration, working class people who don’t get their welfare cut off, though that did happen about 20 years ago if I remember correctly. This is basically the same thing Leftists have always said, that it’s raciss to cut off muh welfare check and cut off taxes because Blacks disproportionately collect welfare and Whites disproportionately pay taxes. You are just another Leftist.

48 Greig May 17, 2017 at 12:23 am

*cut taxes

49 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 9:16 am

Hazel, ‘white privilege’ is a bit of blather favored by college and university administrators. It has little social reality. In 1948, it would have largely consisted of the wage premium and status premium for whites attributable to economic injuries to blacks from caste attitudes. The black population was about 11% of the total and had incomes about 1/2 those of whites. Caste attitudes indubitably explained some part of the wage differential, but you’re talking along the lines of whites enjoying incomes perhaps 2% or 3% higher than they would have if blacks had been given a fair shake. In our own time, you could build a bibliography of studies attempting to locate the share of the wage differential attributable to caste attitudes, but I doubt you’ll find many studies where compensation gaps attributable to caste attitudes exceed a single digit percentage. A white wage premium is just not a consequential source of income for anyone.

There is another source of ‘privilege’, and that’s found in human relations in public spaces. It was pretty common in 1948 for vendors to restrict their custom. That hasn’t been an issue in this country for nearly 50 years.

There is a third source of privilege, and that has to do with the properties of public discourse and certain social narratives. No, generic white people are not privileged in this sense, nor have they been in more than 50 years.

50 Hazel Meade May 17, 2017 at 11:27 am

Let me repeat what I said:

White people have the political power to bring the forces of the state to bear to bend the rules in their favor in a way that no other ethnic group can.

Let’s look at another example. In the 1980,s black America had a crack cocaine epidemic. What happened? We got heavy policing, three strikes your own and mandatory minimums. Now, white America has an opioid epidemic. What happens? More money for drug treatment and substance abuse programs.

The way the government handles issues that disparately impact whites is way different than the way it handles issues that affect blacks. And now, working class whites in the rust-belt are suffering? Government needs to step in and help! We’ve got a social obligation to provide jobs to our fellow citizens!

What happens when someone say “Hey, we’ve got a social obligation to make sure black people have jobs”? LOL, at best black people get affirmative action to maybe get a slight advantage in hiring and college admissions, and conservative piss their pants about it.

The hypocrisy is raging. the art-right *explicitly advocates* favoring white immigration for the *explicit purpose* of maintaining a white-dominated America and you’re standing here claiming that white privilege doesn’t exist.

White people (some white people) think they own America and that minorities aren’t real Americans. They vote for policies that favor continuing and maintaining a white-dominated culturally “white” society, and then claim that it doesn’t exist.

What do I think?i think that America and American cultural identity is defined by ideas and not by race.

51 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 12:20 pm

Let’s look at another example. In the 1980,s black America had a crack cocaine epidemic. What happened? We got heavy policing, three strikes your own and mandatory minimums. Now, white America has an opioid epidemic. What happens? More money for drug treatment and substance abuse programs.

You’re being stupid, perhaps because you were holed-up in Saskatoon in 1985. Public policy changes you’re referring to antedated the crack craze and proceeded for reasons unrelated to it. The context was the huge run-up in the frequency of violent crime over the period running from 1960 to 1980 (which had been preceded by a large run up in rates of juvenile delinquency in the dozen years previous). There was a cultural canyon between the cadres operating the criminal justice system and public opinion. The elected officials sided with public opinion and put the breaks on penology being treated as a department of social work. The situation has not in the last 15 years been comparable, because up until about three years ago, violent crime was on a mildly downward trajectory and there is already an architecture of penalties in place for drug abusers of greater reliability than what you had in 1978.

52 Greig May 17, 2017 at 5:36 pm

“Let’s look at another example. In the 1980,s black America had a crack cocaine epidemic. What happened? We got heavy policing, three strikes your own and mandatory minimums. Now, white America has an opioid epidemic. What happens? More money for drug treatment and substance abuse programs. ”

Fake news. We got a lot of drug treatment and substance abuse programs back in the 1980s, my brother actually worked for one. We *still* have three strikes you’re out laws.

“What happens when someone say “Hey, we’ve got a social obligation to make sure black people have jobs”? LOL, at best black people get affirmative action to maybe get a slight advantage in hiring and college admissions, and conservative piss their pants about it. ”

It’s not a slight advantage, it’s a substantial advantage, see the research on the subject. “At best?” One wonders what grand project this “libertarian” wants to do to Make Things Right.

“The hypocrisy is raging. the art-right *explicitly advocates* favoring white immigration for the *explicit purpose* of maintaining a white-dominated America and you’re standing here claiming that white privilege doesn’t exist. ”

The alt-right is not yet in power, so that advocacy does nothing to harm Blacks at present. But good job thinking disagreement with you constitutes oppression, you’d fit in well with the college commissars.

53 TMC May 16, 2017 at 6:18 pm

Identity politics is most often used as a weapon, rather than a tool. They use it to tear others down rather than raise themselves up.

I’ll let you in on a little white guy secret. We don’t really care if you are white/black or male/female. Just try to pull your own weight if you are able to and quit crying about every slight that we have to put up with too. Then you’ll get the respect you have earned.

Reply

54 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 6:29 pm

Disparate impact proves structural, systemic racism. Nice try, but you’re going into the cannibal pot too.

Reply

55 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 10:59 pm

There’s certainly a disparate impact of Trump’s immigration policies. They are rather clearly intended to benefit working class whites.

White people get protection from competition. Brown people get denied the right to bring their families into the country. It’s all about pulling one’s own weight in America.

56 TMC May 16, 2017 at 11:27 pm

White families should have no advantage over any other citizen, but do you not see it’s Trump’s job to favor US citizens over other countries’ citizens?

57 Greig May 17, 2017 at 12:03 am

And there is certainly a disparate impact of cucked immigration policies, Browns get the right to come into a country of a quality their race is incapable of building themselves and the White man has to pay through it more labor competition and taxes to support the Brown immigrants. I’m sure it’s a big coincidence that Hispanics, Muslims, and Jews(not to imply anything antisemitic) support this.

58 Potato May 17, 2017 at 12:05 am

Posted here since I can’t reply to your comment,

You don’t have an intellectual movement. You have millions of people that don’t want a Hillary Clinton Supreme Court due to abortion. You have millions more that did not want their taxes increased. You have millions that chose unproven corruption vs proven corruption. You have millions that pulled the lever for R because Hillary was so Obviously against their interests they felt they had no choice. And they were probably right. Hillary wanted to destroy them.

38% approval rating shows how happy everyone is. Daily scandal and idiocy. A president that literally has no idea what he is doing.

You know, i always hated populism. Because people are idiots. I always hated liberalism, because people that never ran a business shouldn’t make decisions that impact businesses. Because they have no idea. I always hated conservatives, because why actively hate gays? What? They’re gay, not even worth a conversation let alone passing laws against. Libertarians are idiots because they assume 2nd and 3rd order effects. No one is voting for open borders AND no welfare. The choice is open borders AND more welfare. And on and on.

Just eliminate the exit tax.

59 The Anti-Gnostic May 17, 2017 at 12:15 am

You know, i always hated populism. Because people are idiots. I always hated liberalism, because people that never ran a business shouldn’t make decisions that impact businesses. Because they have no idea. I always hated conservatives, because why actively hate gays? What? They’re gay, not even worth a conversation let alone passing laws against. Libertarians are idiots because they assume 2nd and 3rd order effects. No one is voting for open borders AND no welfare. The choice is open borders AND more welfare. And on and on.

Welcome to the Alt-Right. Hans-Herman Hoppe is right: democracy must die.

60 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 9:23 am

I always hated conservatives, because why actively hate gays?

People who are part of the gay subculture amount to < 3% of the adult population. Antagonists of the gay lobby tend toward the view that it's bad to fold, spindle, and mutilate law, custom, and culture in order to accommodate them. They also find sodomy disgusting and grown men who behave like teenage girls embarrassing. In the minds of confused, stupid, and narcissistic people, this counts as 'h8'. Some confused, stupid, and narcissistic people labor under the illusion that other people are stupid.

61 Anonymous May 16, 2017 at 8:45 pm

Honest work, not living in your mother’s basement, but her spare vacation home.

Totally different.

(This really is like leftist dilettante of the 70’s. Trump kids welcome.)

Reply

62 Greig May 17, 2017 at 12:25 am

“This really is like leftist dilettante of the 70’s. Trump kids welcome.”

No clue what you are saying. But I strongly suspect it’s stupid.

63 MOFO May 17, 2017 at 9:24 am

Really dying to make this one work, eh?

64 Anonymous May 17, 2017 at 10:24 am

It is pretty rich. His mother is “heiress to cotton farms in Louisiana” and he lives off that legacy, while denigrating blacks, as a hobby. Pretty much a plantation owner rationalizing his position.

He hasn’t actually made it pay for the full lifestyle, has he?

65 Anonymous May 17, 2017 at 10:40 am

I think the 70s comparison holds up too. Back then heirs and heiresses would declare themselves Marxist, and run off to join some Red movement. Is just a different time, with a different movement, a way to inflate self worth.

66 Greig May 17, 2017 at 5:48 pm

“I think the 70s comparison holds up too. Back then heirs and heiresses would declare themselves Marxist, and run off to join some Red movement. Is just a different time, with a different movement, a way to inflate self worth.”

Why go back to the 70s? How do you think all those unpaid interns working for the mainstream media pay their expenses?

67 Anonymous May 16, 2017 at 8:46 pm

I mean what says decline of the White Race better than hunting giraffe with mom’s money?

Reply

68 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 10:56 pm

Right. This is why conservative care so much about working class whites in the rust-belt , and want to keep immigrants and foreign products out.
It’s all about pulling oneself up by one’s bootstraps and competing on a level playing field. It just so happens that all the stuff trump advocates disproportionately benefits whites. Total Coincidence.

Meanwhile Hispanic mothers are being torn from their families. Because “anchor babies” and they aren’t really Americans and shit.

Reply

69 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 11:46 pm

They can move back to the tender embraces of their co-ethnics.

You’re not saying their co-ethnics are less capable of providing a non-corrupt, safe civil order than white Americans are you, bigot?

70 Potato May 16, 2017 at 11:54 pm

It comes down to worldview. Is there a right to live anywhere you want, or not. Freedom of movement and open borders. Right to move anywhere and the right to vote and receive welfare benefits as a resident. Or, as some would argue, is citizenship a gated community, that can decide who is in and who is out. That’s what we can debate in good faith. Let them in but don’t give them handouts is not on the menu. Let them in but don’t let them or their children vote is not on the menu either.

This is a philosophical debate. “Tearing families apart” does nothing for me. You’re a libertarian for gods sake. Drop the emoting bullshit. That works on idiots.

Defend the utilitarian right to live and work anywhere, and the right to receive Medicaid, food stamps, and free lunches. That’s your argument, please stick to it. You’re obviously a smart kid, so defend it well. I’m open to being convinced. I still lean towards Milton: you can have open borders or a welfare state, but not both.

All I ask for, from the idiots in Washington, is to eliminate the dropping citizenship tax (exit tax). All I want is to be able to leave without paying. Then yes, welfare and open borders. But that’s not on the menu.

71 The Anti-Gnostic May 17, 2017 at 12:04 am

There is no right to “live and work anywhere.” In a libertarian society all movement off your property would require the permission of adjacent landowners. The category of “immigrant” would not even exist; there would only be owners, tenants and trespassers. “Immigrants” would be shot or drown at sea or die in the high desert. There would be no public roads or due process, only those sojourner’s rights as you could afford to purchase from the landowners.

As you seem to grasp, libertarianism should only be concerned with exit rights.

72 Potato May 17, 2017 at 12:35 am

Hazel,

Eres un chico inteligente. Pero necesitas entender la diferencia en que fronteras abridos, y en contra de una policía en que la frontera está vigilando.

73 msgkings May 17, 2017 at 12:54 pm

@Potato, if they drop the tax where would you go?

74 Art Deco May 16, 2017 at 7:47 pm

By no sensible comparative standard are blacks or chicanos ‘oppressed’. Neither are generic whites ‘privileged’ if the term is anything but a bit of rhetorical gamesmanship. There are particular people or sets of people who gain advantages through connections, but they’re a very small subset of the population. As for social conditions in black populations, they could be improved considerably using the some fairly conventional tools of collective action. With an exception here and there, the nation’s corps of black politicians is (if anything) more indifferent and hostile to such a program than suburban politicians are.

Reply

75 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 11:09 pm

What do you consider voting for immigration policies that just so happen to benefit mostly working class whites at the expense of Hispanics?

Reply

76 TMC May 16, 2017 at 11:29 pm

…just so happen to benefit mostly working class citizens at the expense of non citizens?

77 asdf May 16, 2017 at 11:48 pm

Hispanic immigrants are a net cost. Does not letting a net cost move in and vote themselves welfare a “benefit at someone else’s expense.” I would think the welfare sucking Hispanics were the ones voting for benefits at someone else’s expense.

78 Greig May 16, 2017 at 11:55 pm

It benefits working class Blacks too, you know there are a few working class Blacks. The real distinction is citizens vs. non-citizens.

79 Potato May 17, 2017 at 12:21 am

Dime, que policías estas quisiendo? Si quieres una policía en que la gente que esté viniendo inmediatamente tiene papeles. Okay, pero si quieres que no haya fronteras, entonces necesitas decirlo. Y es posible que pueda estar de acuerdo.

80 Noboody May 17, 2017 at 1:16 am

Working class blacks have probably suffered the most from liberal immigration policy since the 60s.

81 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 9:32 am

What do you consider voting for immigration policies that just so happen to benefit mostly working class whites at the expense of Hispanics?

The only Hispanics whose interests are injured are people hoping to bring their relatives in (and Hispanics professionally employed in operating the Democratic Party vote farm). Your complaint, Hazel, is that there are borders and self-governing communities. I’m happy to let Mexico be Mexico and Quebec to be Quebec. I’d like the same franchise for my own country. An aspect of exercising that franchise is that immigration flows be modest in dimension and consist of foreigners with a demonstrated affinity for American lifeways as they are.

There’s a reason Mr. Sailer refers to libertarianism as ‘applied autism’.

82 Hazel Meade May 17, 2017 at 11:33 am

It benefits working class Blacks too, you know there are a few working class Blacks. The real distinction is citizens vs. non-citizens.

You know it’s telling how few people actually are making this argument.
The alt-right isn’t out there saying ‘hey we’ve got a moral obligation to create a job market where black people have a better chance of being employed. So therefore we should have less immigration.”

Rather, they’re pissing their pants over affirmative action and saying the reason we should keep out Hispanics is because they are intellectually and culturally inferior.

I could respect an anti-immigration argument that was based on a feeling of obligation to help black communities. But guess, what? Nobody’s doing any such thing.

83 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 12:11 pm

I could respect an anti-immigration argument that was based on a feeling of obligation to help black communities. But guess, what? Nobody’s doing any such thing.

Steve Sailer’s been making that argument for a dozen years or more. Many of his acolytes loathe blacks and seek a negative outcome for them. Sailer has been known to critique and lampoon aspects of black culture and social practice, but he manifests no particular hostility to the material interests of rank-and-file blacks. Any concern with the welfare of low-skill tertiary sector-workers incorporates a concern for the material welfare of blacks.

84 Greig May 17, 2017 at 5:44 pm

“You know it’s telling how few people actually are making this argument. The alt-right isn’t out there saying ‘hey we’ve got a moral obligation to create a job market where black people have a better chance of being employed.”

Nonsense, the alt-right has been making that argument forever, long before it was called the alt-right. Mostly, however, the argument is for working class Americans or simply Americans, rather than identifying specific races.

“Rather, they’re pissing their pants over affirmative action and saying the reason we should keep out Hispanics is because they are intellectually and culturally inferior. ”

The libertarian position on affirmative action is to refuse to discuss it except when they attack those who criticize it. They are the useful idiots of the Left. And do you have an argument against the claim that Hispanics are intellectually and culturally inferior?

“I could respect an anti-immigration argument that was based on a feeling of obligation to help black communities.”

You should consider the psychological reasons why you “could respect” an obligation to help a divergent race but “piss your pants” when someone suggests you owe an obligation to your own race.

85 Art Deco May 16, 2017 at 7:49 pm

By no sensible comparative standard are blacks or chicanos ‘oppressed’. Neither are generic whites ‘privileged’ if the term is anything but a bit of rhetorical gamesmanship. There are particular people or sets of people who gain advantages through connections, but they’re a very small subset of the population. As for social conditions in black populations, they could be improved considerably using the some fairly conventional tools of collective action. With an exception here and there, the nation’s corps of black politicians is (if anything) more indifferent and hostile to such a program than suburban politicians are.

zz

Reply

86 albatross May 17, 2017 at 8:32 am

Identity politics among minority groups seems like it almost guatantees the rise of identity politics among whites, which doesn’t seem to be leading us anywhere very good right now. I think we would be better off if racial/ethnic/religious identity went away.

Reply

87 The Centrist May 16, 2017 at 4:43 pm

Agreed. When you look at the big picture, the most horrible regimes of the 20th century have been on the far left and far right: Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia, Cuba, the Norks, Albania, Romania, East Germany, etc etc.

And the most appealing places have been in northern Europe, or in North America or the Antipodes.

Reply

88 Chuck May 16, 2017 at 4:54 pm

The left right political spectrum is restrictive. Google “Anglin Triangle”

Reply

89 Greig May 17, 2017 at 12:30 am

Funny how idiot Anglin put the “Right” on the left side of his triangle.

Reply

90 Thiago Ribeiro May 16, 2017 at 3:36 pm

#6 Meanwhile, every day, humdreds of thousands of Americans go to bed hungry and hundreds of thousands where their next meal will come from. Sad.

Reply

91 Thiago Ribeiro May 16, 2017 at 3:41 pm

This is getting to be too much, the impersonations must end now!

Reply

92 Evans_KY May 16, 2017 at 3:40 pm

2. These ideas have a way if making sense to those who are resentful and easily manipulated. Andrew Sullivan penned something similar at NYMag.

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/04/andrew-sullivan-why-the-reactionary-right-must-be-taken-seriously.html

Reply

93 TheAngryPhilosopher May 17, 2017 at 6:55 am

These ideas have a way if making sense to those who are resentful and easily manipulated. This is exactly how I would describe the whole far-New-Left “social justice” agenda.

Reply

94 dearieme May 16, 2017 at 3:50 pm

That Harvard endowment: what a costly affair. If much of the money were just scattered across “passive” tracker funds it would cost peanuts to run. Then just add an office to deal with property and other illiquid investments, and another to act on all the tips and favours from alumni. Only the latter would be costly, since the pay there would have to include hush money.

Reply

95 Jeff R May 16, 2017 at 4:03 pm

Maybe if most of the funds were invested passively, the trades based on insider info would stick out like a sore thumb?

Reply

96 dearieme May 16, 2017 at 5:19 pm

Good point. Expensive camouflage, though.

Reply

97 rayward May 16, 2017 at 4:01 pm

2. Graeme Wood says that Spencer got his ideas growing up in Dallas, persuasive because Wood and Spencer were classmates at a prep school in Dallas. Spencer went on to Colgate, UVA, and Chicago. Spencer has said he was influenced by Robert Pippin at Chicago, but Pippin told Wood he doesn’t remember Spencer. “I regard his rhetoric and activities as loathsome and despicable,” Pippin wrote to Wood. “I revere the founding principles of liberal democracy, and want no association with the man.” Spencer is a fabulist, much like Trump.

Reply

98 Jeff R May 16, 2017 at 4:06 pm

Maybe it was Scottie Pippen, then. Remember how overrated that guy was?

Reply

99 MOFO May 16, 2017 at 4:39 pm

Why should Pippin remember any one particular person he influenced?

Reply

100 Art Deco May 16, 2017 at 7:24 pm

How many philosophy graduate students have passed through Chicago in the last 15 years?

Reply

101 MOFO May 17, 2017 at 9:30 am

Is that a rhetorical question? Because i kind of avoided philosophy grad school in general so i dont have any real idea.

Reply

102 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 9:48 am

I suppose you could call it a rhetorical question. About 750,000 master’s degrees are awarded every year in this country, of which about 18% are in academic subjects or the arts (or about 135,000). Let’s figure 15% studied by got no degree, so we have about 160,000 students in a given entry cohort. Not sure what the proportion is at the graduate level. I do know that about 1% of those receive bachelor’s degrees in academic or artistic subjects receive philosophy degrees (n.b. 61% of the bachelor’s degrees are in vocational subjects). So, an entry cohort would consist (say), of 1,600 students. While you have some academic master’s degrees handed out by teaching institutions, the vast bulk are traded in by research universities. There are 260-odd research universities in this country. The mean entry cohort would therefore consist of just north of 6 philosophy graduate students, so you’d have shy of 100 students between then and now. Now, a great many universities will have no philosophy graduate program to speak of. Still, if you’re talking about a pool of (say) 200 people, it strikes me as strange that you’ll have no memory whatsoever of a particular person, especially if he’s a certified oddball and enrolled in your classes. I was rather skeptical back in 1988 of the DePauw professors who claimed to recall Dan Quayle (an indifferent student who hadn’t been in their classes for 20 years) in detail useful enough for a newspaper profile. This is the other extreme: a professor who resembles the Anna Quindlen character “Oliver Most”,

103 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 12:51 pm

Not as many young male philosophy graduate students as I bedded in the last year

Reply

104 Anonymous May 16, 2017 at 6:44 pm

The straightforward way to read it is that Spencer got his young adulthood flash of insight, and never recovered.

Most realize, within 6 months, that whatever that insight was for them, it isn’t the whole world.

Reply

105 rayward May 16, 2017 at 7:41 pm

I was talking about Chomsky foucalt you insipid infidels.

Reply

106 rayward May 16, 2017 at 8:04 pm

Imposter.

Reply

107 Anonymous May 16, 2017 at 9:01 pm

Anooj Pakvasa?

Reply

108 rayward May 16, 2017 at 4:10 pm

7. In 2007-08, markets were letting us know (screaming at us no less) that something was amiss and that markets wanted to correct it. Sumner and Krugman prefer not to let markets be markets; one either believes in markets, or one doesn’t, and Sumner and Krugman don’t. Two peas from the same pod. Does Cowen believe in markets?

Reply

109 gordon wood May 16, 2017 at 4:24 pm

Dreamsounds gurgle but bubbles of spittal pop. The question is, what exactly is a gurgle. And can you draw one if your atelier has a chifforobe and chaise longue, ibid crystalline lattice open market trades at the 3.2 constant. Markets are correlated but people don’t act rationally. A gurgle is an unconscious behavior.

Reply

110 The Anti-Gnostic May 16, 2017 at 6:00 pm

It’s one of those special exceptions, like the one where free-market economists say that central planners cannot rationally set prices, except the price for credit. Or that all prices should gradually rise, except the price for labor. And the poor should be allowed to become rich, but the rich cannot be allowed to become poor.

Reply

111 Antander May 16, 2017 at 10:38 pm

2008, sure, but 2007 cannot be argued to have an unambiguous market signal. Lookup the data at the time.

Reply

112 Todd Kreider May 16, 2017 at 4:12 pm

3. This is sort of funny… Marc Andreesen mentions Peter Thiel’s complaint that the Golden Gate Bridge took something like 2 1/2 years to complete but a certain new off-ramp will take longer, which I knew was impossible so looked it up.

It turns out Peter Thiel told Francis Fukayama a few years ago that it took 3 1/2 years to build the Golden Gate Bridge. That also seemed a bit too fast so off to wikipedia to get the right answer… The construction began January 3, 1933 and was completed on May 27, 1937. Looks like about 4 1/2 years to me.

(Oh, can someone please let Tyler know that the NYC murder rate wasn’t slashed by “a factor of 20” as he said in a recent interview with David Beckworth but by a factor of 3 from the average of the 80s and 90s — or a factor of 4 if you count just the peak year.)

Reply

113 Art Deco May 16, 2017 at 7:27 pm

No, by a factor of 5.5. It was bouncing around a set point of 27 per 100,000 ca. 1990 and fell to 5 per 100,000.

Reply

114 rayward May 16, 2017 at 4:29 pm

3. Marc Andreessen is remarkably profitable investing in companies that produce . . . losses. Is Andreessen divine?

Reply

115 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 4:34 pm

#2. I think it would be interesting to know what it’s like to be a member of a cult or a secret society or something, but I just don’t think I’m capable of being brainwashed enough. I think people like Spencer (and many leftists) really long for a similar thing – the loss of self into the group identity. To be subsumed into a larger whole – that whole being the nation, the culture, the people, the race, Islam, the Church, the mission. Same impulse, different entity.

A year or two or so ago I saw a German film called ‘The Wave’. Certainly worth watching if you’re interested in how dynamics like that work. It can be a powerful force, because so many people long for that loss of self, and yet it’s also profoundly dangerous. People will do horrible, horrible things to others when they lose individual identity and make themselves part of a group.

Reply

116 The Other Jim May 16, 2017 at 4:43 pm

100% agreed on all points, except that The Wave was cliched and terrible.

If you want a good example of sad, dangerous, mindless groupthink, just walk around an anti-Trump protest, or perhaps read a NY Times comment section.

Reply

117 Rich Berger May 16, 2017 at 5:10 pm

That’s why Auburn University insisted that the “Antifa” creatures take their masks off.

Reply

118 Thiago Ribeiro May 16, 2017 at 6:36 pm

“(…) to be subsumed into a larger whole – that whole being the nation, the culture, the people, the race, Islam, the Church, the mission. Same impulse, different entity.”

It is not the same thing. Some people long for losing their identity so they stop feeling inadequate. Communists, Nazis, Islamic fanatics, etc. But some people subsume themselves -the Army, the Salvation Army, the Fatherland – to do good and help their fellow humans. As an old Brazilian song says, “united, we are stronger” ,

Reply

119 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 10:48 pm

Communists thought they were doing good.
I’m sure Nazis did and Islamists do too.

Reply

120 anonymous reply to Hazel Meade May 17, 2017 at 12:30 am

“Communists thought they were doing good. I’m sure Nazis did and Islamists do too.” Not true, Hazel, not even close. Behind all the arguments, many people have hatred in their hearts. Now I will admit to having insufficient love in my heart, and I am not proud of that – but it is not that hard, for all Christians and for most non-Christians, to guard against hatred in the heart, which is a whole different animal from “insufficient love”. Well, to qualify that statement , it is not that hard to at least try to guard against hatred in one’s heart. At least to try. The Communists, Nazis, and Islamists you speak of often did not even try. However foolish some of the things we often say might be, we are still human. You are human, Hazel: think like a human. Read, for example, the first 16 or 17 chapters in the Book of Proverbs, or the more cynical but heartfelt speeches in Shakespeare’s later plays, if that helps. God loves us, but loves us too much to let us stay the way we are. Pray for those who have let evil direct all their actions and most of their thoughts. It is better to pray for them than to be sure they think they are doing good – they themselves know that they do not think that, and they desperately need our prayers. Don’t forget, of course, to pray for those who have only let evil direct a few of their actions and a few of their thoughts. Pray for everybody, pray for me as I pray for you, and stop saying things that are not true.

Reply

121 ricardo May 17, 2017 at 9:24 am

Efim Polenov, is that you?

122 anonymous reply to Hazel Meade May 18, 2017 at 12:23 am

Good guess. I was really trying to say something to Hazel Meade, as if she were a younger sister or an older sister who had asked a question (yes I realize she did not ask a question), and I thought it more likely she would read the comment with an open heart if she knew the person writing the comment was not trying to score points on behalf of someone who comments often here. There is no pride in being an anonymous! And people listen, I think, more closely to people who do not seem proud. And I really do want her to pray for me. God, like – probably – the AIs of 2070 (who may be reading these archives, focusing in their weakness of course on the 20 word plus posts and comments, if we are lucky over the next fifty or so years) – will clearly know just who someone who is praying for “Anonymous reply to Hazel Meade” is really praying for (well God always has and always will, in fact, know just who anyone praying for anyone they do not know well – down to the most obscure internet commenter – is praying for). Please let me know if I am missing something here. For the record, I do not suggest we should pray for every potential person – I remember Mr A and Mr B from high school algebra who were taking trains to various places at various rates of speed with the obvious intention of providing us young students of algebra with nothing more than a “problem set”: Sad! I think it is safe to say Mr A and Mr B on those algebra problem set trains will never need our prayers. But I could be wrong – I would not be shocked, for example, to meet, in Limbo or Heaven, poor Schrodinger’s Cat, enjoying special treats that the angels have given to that well-known but generally unloved-on-earth creature, out of compassion for the poor unwillingly academic Cat’s secular mistreatment in the books,,and on the chalkboards, of the vast essaim of physics cognoscenti and wannabe cognoscenti. Neither of which am I.

123 Chuck May 16, 2017 at 7:23 pm

Humans are social animals. Loners were competed out of existence long ago.

Reply

124 Massimo Heitor May 17, 2017 at 12:07 am

+1

Reply

125 Greig May 16, 2017 at 7:39 pm

“I think it would be interesting to know what it’s like to be a member of a cult or a secret society or something, but I just don’t think I’m capable of being brainwashed enough”

Hilarious coming from a libertarian.

Reply

126 Hazel Meade May 16, 2017 at 10:49 pm

Which part? The part about not being brainwashable, or the desire to know what it’s like to be in a cult? 😉

Reply

127 Greig May 17, 2017 at 12:38 am

The part where you are oblivious to the fact that the rest of society sees your ideology as as much of a fringe cult as they see Spencer’s.

You will no doubt try to claim that yours can’t be a cult because cults are collectivistic and libertarianism is individualistic. But the defining trait of a cult is messianism, the belief that you have all the answers, this is why libertarianism is seen as a cult-like ideology.

Reply

128 Hazel Meade May 17, 2017 at 11:39 am

Ugh, libertarianism is not messianic. There is no messiah. Besides, we don’t claim to have all the answers. A free market will not make everyone happy, it cannot create infinite resources of violate the laws of physics. An optimal distribution of resources is just optimal. It doesn’t create extra resources.

129 TheAngryPhilosopher May 17, 2017 at 7:14 am

I think it would be interesting to know what it’s like to be a member of a cult or a secret society or something, but I just don’t think I’m capable of being brainwashed enough.

I always find this “I’m too conscious for that” attitude disconcerting. Many (probably most) people seem to think that had they lived in 1930s Germany, they would have been dissidents or at least quietly loathed the Nazis. Very few people I know admit that there is a serious probability that they would not only have been okay with it, but might have been enthusiastic Party members. If I wasn’t Jewish, I certainly might have been. Once upon a time I was a Communist, after all.

Okay, you’re immune (now, today) from Nazi ideology. Congratulations on your keen perception, but perhaps it helped that you grew up in a society which taught you – from the tenderest of ages – that Nazi ideology is awful. This ability to believe things that you were taught is hardly evidence of your immunity to brainwashing. And nothing else you’ve written here indicates to me that you’d be especially resistant to brainwashing.

[Not that everything you were taught is wrong, obviously. But it is funny that the “I’m-immune-to-brainwashing” line is pushed so hard by people who buy into whatever political orthodoxy happens to manifest around them.]

Reply

130 wes May 16, 2017 at 5:47 pm

# 4 [Met Opera ticket sales slump]

NYC Met Opera’s high operating costs are unsustainable. Its 15 labor unions are destroying it.

Average full-time chorus member earned $200,000, plus $100,000 in benefits. The average full-time orchestra member earned $200,000 plus $85,000 in benefits. Highest paid rank and file musician made $395,000. You don’t wanna know what ordinary stagehands are paid.

Reply

131 bj dubbs May 16, 2017 at 5:57 pm

“In his notorious speech that ended in a roomful of fascist salutes, for instance, he referred to the mainstream media as the “Lügenpresse” (“lying press”), a Nazi-era smear against anti-Hitler media, even if Spencer flubbed the pronunciation.”

Spencer’s pronunciation of “Lügenpresse” is fine.

Reply

132 Art Deco May 16, 2017 at 7:37 pm

Both Graeme Wood and Richard Spencer are wasting their lives, and would do well to learn proper trades and confine public life to a much smaller pen of rent-free space in their heads. Social theory is interesting (to some), but it cannot substitute for sociology or history (in the intellectual realm) or for political action (in public life). Politics in well-ordered societies is not something grand, but something tedious (and something best left to the old).

Reply

133 Ali Choudhury May 17, 2017 at 3:30 am

+1

Reply

134 blah May 16, 2017 at 11:13 pm

Regarding 2, a more nuanced picture emerges from a source that doesn’t hate the right wing so much, namely the text of the “Hail Trump” speech by Spencer himself:

“Donald Trump warred against segregated establishments. He supports affirmative action, or put more bluntly, state-sponsored discrimination against whites. He will be perhaps the most pro-Zionist president ever put into office, turning a blind eye to continued Jewish settlement in the Palestinian territories. He opposes the Iran nuclear deal, which, we should admit, isn’t exactly that bad.”

This above quote gives much credence to the possibility – claimed by Spencer himself – that his imitating Nazi language is “in a spirit of irony and exuberance”. Of course, the hate-libber who wrote the article leaves no stone unturned in ensuring that the reader takes all that literally.

Reply

135 Massimo Heitor May 17, 2017 at 3:09 am

#2: Spencer is disgusted at the soulless life of gentrified Dallas that offers no greater purpose than consumption. The more radical alt right, the radical leftists, and even the Islamic terrorists seem to all share this thirst for greater meaning and purpose beyond this consumerist life of earning + spending. In the past, Christianity or Judaism, gave the west its purpose and greater meaning. But the west has basically discarded that kind of religion. And the two main engines of meaning that followed religion, were national identity and ethnic identity, and those are being undermined too.

Immediate family gives normal people purpose. And some career tracks that a lucky few have do. Most people with normal jobs, usually don’t get deep meaning + engagement from their career.

Claire Berlinski wrote about this as the “Jose Bove” phenomenon, where different cult leaders offer some vision for greater purpose in life. Jose Bove’s purpose is based on food.

Charles Murray writes about this. The only deep human satisfactions in life are faith, family, community, and career.

There is a hole, a need, for greater meaning and purpose for the masses, and something has to fill it.

People’s racial identities matter a lot to normal people. Stripping these identities away will be problematic. It’s not just “white nationalists” like Spencer who show the deep love of racial identity. Much of the left is at least as passionate about racial identity, just not white identity. Listen to leftists talk about cultural appropriation, and it’s clear they care about their racial groups as long as they aren’t white quite passionately.

Reply

136 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 9:59 am

#2: Spencer is disgusted at the soulless life of gentrified Dallas that offers no greater purpose than consumption.

Contemporary urban spaces are ugly in various ways. They’re ‘soulless’ in an aesthetic sense. The people who live in them are not soulless. If Spencer did not care for the suburban world of the Dallas metroplex, he could have done something that 98% of Americans do, which is set down roots somewhere else. To some extent, he has done that, but in a bizarro way which does not incorporate learning and following a trade or career. It’s not working out for his wife, from whom he is separated. (I cannot help but notice he lasted all of 8 months in Hamilton, NY, a community which could hardly be more different than suburban Dallas).

Reply

137 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 10:04 am

People’s racial identities matter a lot to normal people.

No, people’s ethnos matters some to people, and, in some case, that ethnos is delineated by phenotype. Trump is appealing to people’s national affiliation (which, in this country, is trans-ethnic). Trump’s vociferous detractors have a mix of loyalties, but loyalty to the nation really is not one of them.

Reply

138 Thiago Ribeiro May 17, 2017 at 7:04 am

I find this Spencer guy interesring, but it does not mean he is cultured. “Alternative Right showed signs of erudition. It was not the product of the same Spencer I had known in high school, who’d managed to misquote Shakespeare (‘A poor player who struts and frets his hour upon the stage, then heard no more’) and misspell the name of a SportsCenter anchor (“Craige Killborne”) on his yearbook page.” Hasn’t the piece’s writer heard of Internet, Wikipedia, computers?

Reply

139 Butler T. Reynolds May 17, 2017 at 9:20 am

#1 It’s a good thing we don’t have hierarchical position names in the US. My title at work would be Reynolds-MR-Reader.

Reply

140 Art Deco May 17, 2017 at 12:49 pm

I am presently masturbating while looking at a picture of my father

Reply

141 msgkings May 17, 2017 at 2:37 pm

My stipend check from Alex Tabarrok bounced.

Reply

142 zztop May 17, 2017 at 3:41 pm

3). This is why MR is so great. Andreessen interview schedule and public communication has been a bit light lately, and Tyler found this. Great find! Andreessen always delivers great interviews. This one is fantastic. Tyler gets a hat tip, of course.

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: