Thursday assorted links

by on August 17, 2017 at 11:51 am in Uncategorized | Permalink

1. Is the claim of increasing alcoholism based on flawed data?

2. Poverty and housing insecurity along Jefferson Davis Highway.  By the way, did you know that a 1963 law required North-South streets in Alexandria to be named after Confederate generals, “insofar as possible”?  And in one poll, a plurality of African-Americans think the statues should stay.

3. What does the CBO say about cutting off CSR subsidiesNB: We do not know if this is correct!

4. The Haitian dollar as an abstract unit of account.  And viewing the 2015 eclipse from the Faroe Islands.

5. Why is pop music slowing down?

6. New major study of the Bank of England coming out.

1 Thiago Ribeiro August 17, 2017 at 12:01 pm

“By the way, did you know that a 1963 law required North-South streets in Alexandria to be named after Confederate generals, ‘insofar as possible’?”
So that’s what America has become: a country that celebrates the “lost cause”, the enslavement of men by their fellow men!

2 mulp August 17, 2017 at 12:45 pm

The lost cause was the war on civil rights which the right keeps losing but turns into election victories followed by economic decline. Given economic decline, the right focuses on emphasizing lost causes to win elections in order to promote more bad economic policies.

Note I use the right’s claims to measure economic results: benefitting white working men. But white working men are worse off because the right rewards not paying workers, who are mostly white working men. Profits is the money from not paying workers, so lower taxes on profits are designed to incentive paying workers less.

And I learned this point reading Milton Friedman’s columns circa 19970 when he pointed out the many ways high tax rates caused lots of wasteful paying of too many workers too much pay because the IRS paid most of the higher labor costs.

When your economic plans lead to lower income to workers, you need to distract workers who vote from economic policies and focus them on other workers as the enemy. Vote for us because we will ensure you get to keep your jobs as we kill jobs of your enemies: non-whites, women, Jews, gays, ….

But whites will end up suffering just like everyone else, so protecting white workers from bad economic policies is a losing cause.

3 spencer August 17, 2017 at 12:58 pm

Note that Friedman’s claim that high taxes subsidizes higher labor cost is also true of all other business expenses.
So if it lead to higher labor use it also lead to higher use of all other business inputs. I have no idea what the net results would be.

4 Thiago Ribeiro August 17, 2017 at 1:43 pm

“the right focuses on emphasizing lost causes to win elections in order to promote more bad economic policies.”
It only works because, deep down, most Americans favor racial supremacism. I can imgine Brazilian voters voting for racist politicians.

5 Ray Lopez August 17, 2017 at 1:11 pm

I wish they would widen both Jeff-Davis highway (Rt. 1), which they say they will, and I-95 interstate, down to Fredericksburg and beyond, as it’s a bottleneck (I-95 is a parking lot during rush hour, amazing). It will also help both me and neighbor Bill Cosby with our undeveloped real estate. Right now this real estate is assessed for $1M but with the right density it could easily go to $10M or well beyond (for net worth purposes, I estimate it at the assessed value; I’m not pulling punches when I say my family is in the 1%,*minimum* net worth of $8M. Minimum, people).

From the article: “Twins Sophia and Samuel Hamlin, 2, stand outside of their family’s home in the Bermuda Estates mobile home park along Jefferson Davis Highway. Their father, Richard Hamlin, worries that the park could close to make way for a housing development his family can’t afford to live in. “That’s why so many people have to stay in hotels,” he said. “They keep closing the trailer parks.”

I tried to get permission to set up a trailer park on our land down there, but the resistance from the rich neighbors was so fierce when word leaked out we abandoned the project. The fellow 1%’ers down there did not appreciate it one bit, sad!

Bonus trivia: trailer parks are tornado magnets, so true. The one time a tornado briefly touched down in northern VA it hit a trailer park. I’m speculating: could the metal in the parks somehow electrically attract the tornado funnel somehow, like lightning (which is found around tornado vortexes?)

Bonus trivia II: supposedly Robert E. Lee owed our farm way back then, from what I’ve been told. Haven’t found any civil war memorabilia yet however, but the farm is so vast I’ve not even walked all of it. Did find a 1940s car chassis however, don’t know how it got on the property. And bear tracks. Bears!

6 Babbage August 17, 2017 at 2:15 pm

They are bringing the I-95 HOT lanes down past Fredericksburg, they’re almost there already.

7 Ray Lopez August 17, 2017 at 5:22 pm

+1 really? I did not know that, thanks I’ll research that.

8 Ray Lopez August 17, 2017 at 5:35 pm

I could not find any I-95 HOT widening to Fredericksburg. The best I found was what I already knew: widening of I-95 HOT lanes to Route 610, which is well north of Fredericksburg (15-20 miles north). Any additional info appreciated.

9 Babbage August 18, 2017 at 12:12 am

They’re already 10-15 miles north of Fredericksburg and have been for years. The remaining stretch is under construction right now, you can drive past and see it.

10 prior_test3 August 17, 2017 at 2:45 pm

‘The one time a tornado briefly touched down in northern VA it hit a trailer park’

Nope – the first recorded tornado in NoVa hit WT Woodson high school, Pickett Shopping Center, and several homes (including a classmate’s)

The next recorded tornado hit WT Woodson high school, and a number of homes in another subdivision (including another classmate’s).

https://patch.com/virginia/fairfaxcity/woodson-a-repeat-victim-in-tornado-touchdowns

11 Thor August 17, 2017 at 11:17 pm

Well, dang, there’s Ray’s novel theory of the tornado-attracting property of metal trailers, shot down.

12 rayward August 17, 2017 at 12:11 pm

1. Flawed data about alcoholism? Of course the data is flawed. This: “Mom was an alcoholic, drinking a bottle of gin a day.” Or this: “Mom worked hard taking care of the family and needed her daily naps.” Southerners have always lived by the little lies. Heck, every great Southern writer is an expert in the telling of them. Or as my Southern barrister father in law would tell his wife: “Muther, you can’t git drunk off light beah”.

13 Yancey Ward August 17, 2017 at 12:15 pm

Monday’s will be the first total eclipse I have witnessed (hopefully the weather will cooperate more than it did in the Faroes in 2015). I have been waiting for this one since I was in the 7th grade in 1979 when all the news stories about the the February 26th total eclipse in the northwest US was going to be the last one in the continental states until August 21, 2017.

The story on the 2015 eclipse puts time in perspective, though- it was the penultimate total eclipse of Saros Series 120. Saros Series 120 began with a partial eclipse on March 27th in the year 933 AD in Antarctica, and will end with a partial eclipse on July 7, 2195 near the Arctic Circle.

14 liberalarts August 17, 2017 at 12:40 pm

I was in 7th grade too in 1979. We made pinhole cameras and went out during it to use them. Quite unsatisfying. Most of us used the (“you’ll permanently damage your eyes if you do that”) glance and squint to really see what was going on.

15 Anon August 17, 2017 at 12:19 pm

Re (1), respect to Prof Cowen posting a critique of a study that he had previously cited with favor. Thanks Professor.

16 another anon August 17, 2017 at 10:12 pm

Yes, those who are gifted with the ability to reason should do this more often

17 rayward August 17, 2017 at 12:35 pm

2. Should we demolish Nazi gas chambers? The statues of confederate generals, typically proud, stern, and tall in the saddle, could be viewed a symbol of the fraud that was the Cause. I remember when my small Southern town acquired a bunch of the lights that were erected at the 1964 world’s fair in NY and placed them around the park in the town square to illuminate the Confederate statue. I also remember the consternation of the town fathers when it was revealed that the lights designated the location of toilets at the fair.

18 mulp August 17, 2017 at 12:56 pm

Well, they weren’t built during Jim Crow to remind people of traitors to America as patriotic America was defined post WWI and WWII.

The Confederate war statues are like German conservatives today building statues of Adolf Hitler, Hermann Göring, Rudolf Hess today as part of opposition to Merkel economic and diversity policies. It’s the same passage of time since the war.

19 derek August 17, 2017 at 12:40 pm

Far better to tear down some statue than actually challenge the Democrat large city machines that maintain the hopeless and crime ridden living conditions of african americans.

20 EverExtruder August 17, 2017 at 1:08 pm

+1

Squirrel!

21 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 2:10 pm

Right, because it takes at least a thousand people a thousand days to take down each statue. Nothing else could possibly be done at the same time.

22 EverExtruder August 17, 2017 at 2:46 pm

“Nothing else could possibly be done at the same time.”

Something getting done at the same time? Like improving urban livability, finances, and the lives of inner city blacks like Derek said? Over numerous decades….literally anytime…not just the same time? Apparently not when there’s a rich juicy dog whistle like statues that need removing! Apparently not.

23 shrikanthk August 17, 2017 at 12:43 pm

Should we stop showing ‘Gone with the Wind’ on television?

24 rayward August 17, 2017 at 12:52 pm

Nazis and white supremacists hate Gone with the Wind, not only because it depicts the pro-slavery South as having been vanquished by the anti-slavery North, but because it depicts Southern men as weak while depicting Southern women as strong.

25 Careless August 17, 2017 at 1:57 pm

On the one hand, I want to make an “I guess you’d know” comment.

But it’s well established that rayward knows nothing about anything, so I don’t know what to do

26 JWatts August 17, 2017 at 2:15 pm

LOL, yes I really can’t contradict rayward, because I don’t know and have never known any Nazis or white supremacists. Having grown up in the South, Gone with the Wind is a perennial favorite.

It’s possible that white supremacists hate it. From his comment, one would assume that rayward has some close associates or family members of that nature and has some close personal knowledge of their behavior.

27 prior_test3 August 17, 2017 at 3:11 pm

‘because I don’t know and have never known any Nazis or white supremacists’

Possible of course, or possibly you just didn’t actually know them well enough? Cannot speak for anywhere but northern Virginia (and not the limited definition of Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William), but several people I have dealt with in my life, including a really, really good motorcycle mechanic my age had no problem with the fact that they were white supremacists, though they were not particularly evangelical about it.

Of course, that was also decades ago – possibly things are quite different these days.

Maybe we could ask the people that recently started flying that giant Confederate flag off 95 near Fredericksburg if they know any Nazis or white supremacists. What are the odds they say yes? And if they say no, would you actually believe them?

‘From his comment, one would assume that rayward has some close associates or family members of that nature and has some close personal knowledge of their behavior.’

Well, I have to admit that even knowing a couple of white supremacists, we never talked about movies in the past. That Nazi thing was not much of an issue back in the Blues Brothers days – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTT1qUswYL0 Strangely though, while the Nazis were disciplined and calm, the crowd opposing them was violent and unruly as the Nazi leader spoke truth to power – until a couple of unemployed musicians showed up, use a car as a weapon, and ruined their day – without a permit. Back when leftist Hollywood propaganda caused Americans to cheer anyone who hated Nazis – undoubtedly just like their fathers who fought in WWII hated Nazis due to Hollywood propaganda.

28 The Centrist August 17, 2017 at 11:24 pm

You are full of crapola Careless. There’s precisely zero indication that Rayward is a good ol’ racist southerner. On the contrary, while he goes on and on, he’s a decent man.

29 Careless August 18, 2017 at 1:12 am

The centrist, how am I full of crap? He’s the one claiming to be an expert!

30 Floccina August 17, 2017 at 12:55 pm

#2 Let people subdivide and build $270/week is to much. Guard your reputation for paying back load like you life depends on it people.

I once stayed with a few friends in New Iberia LA and when you turned on a light at night you would see cockroaches shoulder to shoulder. I must not understand something because roach powder is cheap and works for me.

31 The Other Jim August 17, 2017 at 1:06 pm

2: Just like no one cares about the name “Redskins,” no one cares about streets and statues for Confederate generals.

It does provide a “fresh” (ha) outlet for bored SJWs still furious about losing the most historic election in history. And as a bonus, it gives them things to stand in front of. That’s a big plus.

32 dan1111 August 18, 2017 at 7:21 am

I’m a conservative Republican, and I think the confederate monuments should go.

33 Jak Cav August 18, 2017 at 1:03 pm

Nice! Knowing your political affiliation really makes your desire to have the monuments go that much more profound. Thanks for sharing.

34 Rich Berger August 17, 2017 at 1:09 pm

1. Maybe not flawed data, but stupid benchmarks. A standard drink is a can of beer, one glass of wine (5 to a bottle) or 1.5% ounces of distilled spirits. So you have a six pack or a bottle of wine once a week and you are an alcoholic? Who do these people associate with? Are they all Mormons?

35 Axa August 17, 2017 at 1:31 pm

This.

If I remember alcohol benchmarks are estimated for a 160 lb (72 kg) male. What happens with 100+kg guys? The only way to get near tipsy is to exceed benchmarks.

36 a counterclockwise witness August 17, 2017 at 9:42 pm
37 mulp August 17, 2017 at 1:25 pm

I can’t understand why at least one insurer isn’t offering policies in every county. Offer a silver policy at $20,000 and the subsidies will be so high if you are the only silver policy you can offer a a bronze policy for free with a small deductible to everyone with income under about $30k.

The only reason insurers haven’t done this is State insurance regulators have blocked silver policies with high premiums for the Federal market place as a way to eliminate insurance offerings.

Either that, or insurance CEOS are really really stupid.

38 Careless August 17, 2017 at 2:00 pm

Yeah, one of those two, or you have no clue what you’re talking about.

I know where I’m placing my bets

39 Ray Lopez August 17, 2017 at 1:25 pm

#6 – I’ve pre-ordered the Bank of England study on Kindle. Keep in mind a couple of things:

1) evidence shows money is largely neutral short term and long (Bernanke et al FAVAR study, 2002), so largely monetarism, while somewhat important short term, is largely irrelevant. It’s like, by analogy, all these books people write in chess about obscure openings or obscure tournaments (Zurich 1953) that take on, in the eyes of the chess fans, a larger-than-life significance.

2) the Bank of England has been considered, historically, one of the *least* independent central banks. Besides commentators saying this, look how easily John Major caved into George Soros’ demands on Black Monday.

Monetarism: pushing on a string and pretending to be pulling with it. Hey I like that quote I just made up.

40 Carl-Henri Prophète August 17, 2017 at 1:39 pm

#4 re: Haitian Dollar- many interesting parts in the study, but contrary to author, my personal experience is that the use of the term “Haitian Dollar” has been slowly but surely declining. I see it mostly as a lasting effect of a long period of fixed exchange rate with the US dollar (5 to 1). France had something similar when they moved from the Old Francs to the New Francs (worth 100 old ones) with people still counting in Old Francs even long after the currency revaluation.

41 Thanatos Savehn August 17, 2017 at 1:48 pm

#1 VOX is where the innumerate go to have their biases confirmed.

The easy VOX-free answer is that the sorts of surveys on which the study was based are notoriously inaccurate and horribly biased. The idea is to measure alcohol consumption by asking people how much they drink and then, using some assumptions about how much the average man/woman weighs and what constitutes “too much” for such average person, figure out how many people are having too much. It’s shoddy science from the git go.

Galileo wrote: “Measure what is measurable and make measurable what is not so”. You don’t make EtOH consumption measurable by asking a drinker how much he drank last year. He lies to himself and he’ll surely lie to survey takers. The same is true of smoking. Compare sales of cigarettes to estimates of consumption from surveys and you’ll get two very different numbers. In the case of prior smoking history there’s now a much more accurate assessment tool: http://thorax.bmj.com/content/early/2017/01/18/thoraxjnl-2016-208789.abstract This is how you measure exposure. Unfortunately the results don’t fit the “national malaise-driven opiod/alcohol epidemic” narrative.

42 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 2:13 pm

I’m quite ambivalent on statues and naming of buildings, highways. I would hope that most of you are as well, even those who lean toward “keep them.” If you are sane, and ambivalent, it’s no big deal if they go away through some democratic process. It’s only if you hold out, and defy democracy, to keep some idol that you think is more important than civil democracy, that you might have a problem. A problem you should meditate on.

43 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 2:22 pm

I frankly don’t really understand the controversy except as an excuse for people to bash each other, as usual. People can name anything whatever they want and put up or take down statues as they please. It’s a local issue. If people want it, do it, if not, don’t do it.

44 JWatts August 17, 2017 at 2:30 pm

“I’m quite ambivalent on statues and naming of buildings, highways. I would hope that most of you are as well, even those who lean toward “keep them.” If you are sane, and ambivalent, it’s no big deal if they go away through some democratic process.”

Agreed.

” It’s only if you hold out, and defy democracy, to keep some idol that you think is more important than civil democracy, that you might have a problem. A problem you should meditate on.”

And here you sound like an ideologue, not willing to admit that there are two legitimate sides to the debate. There was nothing about the event in Durham, NC that was Democratic. It was a mob, vandalizing a public statue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfyXa3GBq2Q

Perhaps this is a problem you should meditate on.

45 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 2:31 pm

Back up, buddy.

Explain this one simple thing. If I am accepting the democratic outcome, and NOT my opinion, how do I get to be an ideologue?

46 JWatts August 17, 2017 at 2:37 pm

” If I am accepting the democratic outcome, and NOT my opinion, how do I get to be an ideologue?”

You seem to be pushing for a removal of the statues in every case. Am I wrong? Are you fine with leaving the statues in any locality in which a majority of the population accepts them?

47 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 2:40 pm

That’s a pretty whack interpretation, but I think it is common.

You fear democracy, because it *might* just *might* have an outcome you don’t like. You can’t support the process “blind.”

48 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 2:42 pm

(I’m fine with whatever. I think these statues will stand far less time than these, but ultimately all is impermanent.)

49 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 2:49 pm
50 JWatts August 17, 2017 at 3:14 pm

“You fear democracy, because it *might* just *might* have an outcome you don’t like. ”

That was not “democracy” in Durham, it was a mob.

“You can’t support the process “blind.””

You are the blind one, who is ignoring that this hasn’t been a very democratic process. I fully support a democratic process, but I’ll push back against an ideological minority that wants to impose it’s will on the majority.

“(I’m fine with whatever. I think these statues will stand far less time than these, but ultimately all is impermanent.)”

Whereas, I’m fully against the Taliban dynamiting historical monuments just because it’s upsetting to their culture. The world is big and there is plenty of room for diverse points of view. Small minds want to destroy everything that annoys and aggravates them.

51 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 3:16 pm

I think you are a bit unhinged.

I never endorsed mob removal of statues.

52 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 3:17 pm

Buddhists never “endorsed” the Taliban either.

53 JWatts August 17, 2017 at 3:48 pm

You seem to have forgotten the question: Are you fine with leaving the statues in any locality in which a majority of the population accepts them?

54 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 3:51 pm

Dude. Look again at my first comment. I say “some democratic process” and ” civil democracy.”

For some reason you want to fart around and put other words in my mouth. When I say some democratic process and civil democracy I mean that. Not mobs. Not totalitarian regimes.

55 JWatts August 17, 2017 at 4:05 pm

“For some reason you want to fart around and put other words in my mouth. ”

I didn’t put any words in your mouth. I asked you a simple yes or no question.

56 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 4:09 pm

You ignored my answers:

“If I am accepting the democratic outcome, and NOT my opinion, how do I get to be an ideologue?”

For some freakish reasoning, something in your own internal state, you REFUSED that I was about “accepting the democratic outcome” and you kept asking more bullshit questions for things already answered.

You have a problem.

57 Brian Donohue August 17, 2017 at 4:27 pm

Anonymous: “You fear democracy, because it *might* just *might* have an outcome you don’t like. You can’t support the process “blind.””

Also Anonymous: Impeach Trump Now!

58 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 4:45 pm

The first part was accusation that unlike me, Watts was not willing to accept democracy without reservation, yes.

On the second, the 25th amendment is looking like a better fit. But don’t take just my word for it. Senator Rob Corker (R):

“The president has not yet been able to demonstrate the stability nor some of the competence that he needs to demonstrate in order to be successful,” Corker, who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said. “And we need for him to be successful.”

“He also recently has not demonstrated that he understands the character of this nation. He has not demonstrated that he understands what has made this nation great,” he added. “Without the things that I just mentioned happening, our nation is going to go through great peril.”

59 Another Anon August 17, 2017 at 6:00 pm

Anonymous aka anon is a hack. Not worth engaging the guy in conversation. Ignore.

60 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 6:15 pm

Buddy, I am feeling some simple satisfaction that I figured this out early, and got there first.

Trump was never qualified for this office. High Republicans are admitting that now. Some may hold some last ditch hope for a “pivot,” but that is not going to happen.

We are down to modes of failure.

http://www.weeklystandard.com/article/2009341/

61 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 6:24 pm

Mitt was there too

Check out @CNNSitRoom’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/CNNSitRoom/status/897952937686605824?s=09

62 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 7:13 pm
63 Jak Cav August 18, 2017 at 1:10 pm

Anonymous, he asked you a yes or no if you’re fine with leaving the statues if the local majority accepts them, you nut. It’s an anonymous forum you’re not running for office. No one cares about your filibuster.

64 Anonymous August 17, 2017 at 3:04 pm

To state an opinion, it is kind of sad that Southerners (and rightists?) have a harder time giving up 100 year old (at the outside) statues of traitors, than the Buddhists do giving up 1700 year old statues of the Buddha.

65 Potato August 17, 2017 at 11:32 pm

You could ask the remaining Buddhists in Afghanistan I suppose.

Wait….🤔

66 JWatts August 18, 2017 at 9:15 am

“You could ask the remaining Buddhists in Afghanistan I suppose. … Wait….”

That statement when right over his head.

67 JWatts August 18, 2017 at 9:15 am

went right over…swoosh

68 Anonymous August 18, 2017 at 12:17 am

What a profoundly bizarre statement. You think the Buddhists had no problem giving up on their statues??

69 Jak Cav August 18, 2017 at 1:11 pm

wow

70 Anonymous August 18, 2017 at 12:18 am

“The statues are impermanent too. We all know that. But it does not mean that we should be completely inactive. Otherwise such things like the destruction of the statues will happen again. Barbarism can be stopped. Because barbarism is impermanent too. Barbarism should be made more impermanent than the statues.”

71 BC August 17, 2017 at 3:20 pm

2(c) Poll seems non-neutrally worded, “Remain as a historical symbol” vs. “Be removed because they are offensive to some people”. Phrase “offensive to some people” suggests some small minority over-ruling sensibilities of a broad majority. What if one thinks that they should be removed because Confederate leaders are not worthy of honoring, statues have become symbols of the Alt-Right, or some other reason? Phrase “as a historical symbol” also seems to convey a favorable connotation. “Should (possibly easily offended) people be able to prevent the rest of us from preserving historical symbols?” does not seem like a neutral way of framing the question.

I suspect that if the two choices were “accede to the demands of white nationalists to keep Confederate statues” vs “replace them with more widely respected historical figures”, then the poll results might be different. A neutral framing might be “remain” vs. “be removed”.

72 Rafael R August 17, 2017 at 5:42 pm

#5. Pop music is dead in the US and UK and has been dead since the mid 1990’s.

73 Miguel Madeira August 17, 2017 at 10:11 pm

The “Haitian dollar” seems like the Portuguese “conto”, a non-official (but used by everybody, including politicians when talking about the budget) monetary unit with the value of 1000 escudos.

74 BC August 17, 2017 at 10:49 pm

3) “Partisans who hysterically charged that repealing the ACA equated to sentencing people to death would logically have to say the same thing about continuing CSR subsidies, crazy though that is.”

We may not know whether the non-partisan CBO’s projections are correct, but the same can be said for all previous CBO scoring. I guess that means that the President shouldn’t make the unconstitutional CSR payments for both Rule of Law reasons and to avoid people “losing” their insurance. How many people did Obama “take insurance away from” in the past when he decided to violate the Constittution? Also, since the effect of not making CSR payments would be to redistribute wealth from rich to poor, that can be used to offset any opposite distributional impact from tax reform.

75 Wwebd August 17, 2017 at 11:12 pm

“Pop music” is the subset of music that people who do not like music all that much like the most. Is the question whether it is speeding up or slowing down?: well, by definition, people don’t care that much what the answer is. Sure we are happy if someone who seems likable can make a career out of it. But don’t forget that it is morally wrong to be boring when you do not have to be boring and that is something that anyone who likes music and who listens to “pop music” too often is often reminded of. Still, good for all our septuagenarian “pop” musicians and all the rest with their never-ending excitement over their beloved chord changes and their well-branded (half a century, now, for many of them, almost as if Dickens were still writing about Tiny Tim during the flapper era) pride of life. (That being said, even pop musicians are musicians, and they are fun to be around on a sunny porch in summer when everyone is joining in on a few songs before or after supper. Lida Rose I’m Home Again Rose – there are thousands of similar great songs. Good times).

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