Results for “law literature”
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My Law and Literature reading list 2018

The New English Bible, Oxford Study Edition [not all of it]

Guantanamo Diary, by Mohamedou Ould Slahi

Petina Gappah, The Book of Memory

Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line.

Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer, used or Kindle edition is recommended

The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories, by Franz Kafka, edited and translated by Joachim Neugroschel.

In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott.

Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, volume 1, also on-line.

I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov.

Juan Gabriel Vasquez, Reputations

The Pledge, Friedrich Durrenmatt.

Ian McEwan, The Children Act

Shakespeare, The Tempest, Folger edition

Margaret Atwood, Hag-Seed

Curtis Dawkins, The Graybar Hotel

Movies: To be determined.

Law and Literature, syllabus for Spring 2017

The New English Bible, Oxford Study Edition

Guantanamo Diary, by Mohamedou Ould Slahi

Petinal Gappah, The Book of Memory

Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line.

Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer, used or Kindle edition is recommended

The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories, by Franz Kafka, edited and translated by Joachim Neugroschel.

In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott.

Primo Levi, If This is a Man

Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, volume 1, also on-line.

I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov.

Death and the Maiden, Ariel Dorfman.

Juan Gabriel Vasquez, Reputations

Graeme Macrae Burnet, His Bloody Project

The Pledge, Friedrich Durrenmatt.

Ian McEwan, The Children Act

 

Movies: Difret, Court, The Chinese Mayor, A Separation

2016 Law and Literature reading list

The New English Bible, Oxford Study Edition

Guantanamo Diary, by Mohamedou Ould Slahi

Albert Camus, The Stranger

Kamel Daoud, The Meursault Investigation

Janet Malcolm, The Crime of Sheila McGough

Njal’s Saga (on-line version is fine)

Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line

Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer, used or Kindle edition is recommended

The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories, by Franz Kafka, edited and translated by Joachim Neugroschel

In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott

Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, volume 1, also on-line

I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov

Moby Dick, by Hermann Melville, excerpts, chapters 89 and 90, available on-line

Death and the Maiden, Ariel Dorfman

The Pledge, Friedrich Durrenmatt

Ian McEwan, The Children Act

We also will see some films and cover some very short on-line readings, as I will distribute at the appropriate times; your papers may draw on these as well.

2015 Law and Literature reading list

The New English Bible, Oxford Study Edition

The Law Code of Manu, Penguin edition

Njal’s Saga (on-line version is fine)

Lawyer Poets and that World Which We Call Law, edited by James Elkins

Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line.

The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories, by Franz Kafka, edited and translated by Joachim Neugroschel.

In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott.

Conrad Black, A Matter of Principle.

Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, volume 1.

I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov.

Moby Dick, by Hermann Melville, excerpts, chapters 89 and 90, available on-line.

Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer.

Death and the Maiden, Ariel Dorfman.

The Pledge, Friedrich Durrenmatt.

E.M. Forster, A Passage to India.

Haruki Murakami, Underground.

Honore de Balzac, Colonel Chabert.

Toer, Pramoedya Ananta, House of Glass.

M.E. Thomas, Confessions of a Sociopath.

Films: A Separation, Memories of Murder, other.

Podcast: Serial

If you are eligible (economics graduate students have taken it in the past), do take my class, I am very happy to have you there.

Law and Literature syllabus 2014

The first class is today!  Here is my reading list:

The New English Bible, Oxford Study Edition

Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line.

Billy Budd and Other Tales, by Hermann Melville.

The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories, by Franz Kafka, edited and translated by Joachim Neugroschel.

In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott.

Conrad Black, A Matter of Principle.

Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, volume 1.

I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov.

Moby Dick, by Hermann Melville, excerpts, chapters 89 and 90, available on-line.

Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer.

Death and the Maiden, Ariel Dorfman.

The Pledge, Friedrich Durrenmatt.

Haruki Murakami, Underground.

Honore de Balzac, Colonel Chabert.

Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49.

M.E. Thomas, Confessions of a Sociopath.

Alan Moore, V for Vendetta.

Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl.

Some additions to this list will be made as we proceed.  We also will view a few movies on legal themes, I will be back in touch on these.

I am likely to use A Separation and Memories of Murder as two of the movies, along with a new release depending on schedule.

Law and Literature reading list for 2013

The New English Bible, Oxford Study Edition

Billy Budd and Other Tales, by Hermann Melville.

The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories, by Franz Kafka.

In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott.

Conrad Black, A Matter of Principle.

Kate Summerscale, Mrs. Robinson’s Disgrace: The Private Diary of a Victorian Lady.

Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line.

Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, volume 1.

I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov.

Moby Dick, by Hermann Melville, excerpts, chapters 89 and 90, available on-line.

Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer.

Running the Books, by Avi Steinberg.

Death and the Maiden, Ariel Dorfman.

The Pledge, Friedrich Durrenmatt.

The Crime of Sheila McGough, Janet Malcolm

Errol Morris, A Wilderness of Error.

Leslie Katz, “John Keats’s Attitudes to Lawyers,” http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1307146

Some additions to this list will be made as we proceed, mostly a few short articles.

We also will view a small number of movies on legal themes. You will be responsible for obtaining these or for viewing them in the theater.  These include:

Capturing the Friedmans

Anatomy of a Murder

A Separation

Memories of Murder

Law and Literature reading list

Class started yesterday, the reading list is here (pdf):

The New English Bible, Oxford Study Edition, Billy Budd and Other Tales, by Hermann Melville. The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories, by Franz Kafka, In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott, Borges and the Eternal Orangutans, by Fernando Verrissimo, Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line, Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, volume 1, I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov, Moby Dick, by Hermann Melville, excerpts, chapters 89 and 90, available on-line. Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer, G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Was Thursday, Edgar Allen Poe, The Gold-Bug, available on-line, Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent, Running the Books, by Avi Steinberg, Sakhalin Island, Anton Chekhov. tr. Brian Reeve, Death and the Maiden, Ariel Dorfman, The Pledge, Friedrich Durrenmatt. tr. Joel Agee, Red Harvest, Dashiell Hammett, Red April, by Santiago Roncagliolo, The Crime of Sheila McGough, Janet Malcolm, Leslie Katz, “John Keats’s Attitudes to Lawyers,” http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1307146.

Some additions to this list will be made as we proceed, mostly a few short articles.  We also will view a small number of movies on legal themes. You will be responsible for obtaining these or for viewing them in the theater.

My Law and Literature reading list, Spring 2010

The semester is underway!

The New English Bible, Oxford Study Edition.

In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott.

Borges and the Eternal Orangutans, by Fernando Verrissimo.

Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line.

Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, volume 1.

I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov.

Moby Dick, by Hermann Melville, excerpts, chapters 89 and 90, available on-line.

Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer.

Oscar Wilde, De Profundis.

Kathryn Davis, The Walking Tour.

Nadezhda Mandelstam, Hope Against Hope: A Memoir.

Haruki Murakami, Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche.

Timothy J. Gilfoyle, A Pickpocket’s Tale.

Henning Mankell, Sidetracked.

Edgar Allen Poe, The Gold-Bug, available on-line.

Walker Percy, The Thanatos Syndrome.

We also will view a small number of movies.

Law and Literature reading list, Spring 2009

The Five Books of Moses, edited and translated by Robert
Alter.

Billy Budd and Other Tales, by Hermann Melville.

The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories,
by Franz Kafka.

Smilla’s Sense of Snow, by Peter Hoeg.

The Art of Political Murder: Who Killed the Bishop? By Francisco
Goldman.

In the Belly of the Beast, by Jack Henry Abbott.

Borges and the Eternal Orangutans, by Fernando Verrissimo.

Glaspell’s Trifles, available on-line.

Great Short Works of Leo Tolstoy, by Leo Tolstoy.

Sherlock Holmes, The Complete Novels and Stories, Sir Arthur
Conan Doyle, volume 1.

Out: A Novel, by Natsuo Kirino.

I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov.

Moby Dick, by Hermann Melville, excerpts, chapters 89 and 90.

Year’s Best SF 9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn
Cramer.

Pale Fire, Vladimir Nabokov.

Blindness, by Jose Saramago.

We also will view a small number of movies — most of all Sia — and perhaps I will add a Henning Mankell novel as well.

My Law and Literature reading list

The first real meeting of the class is today; we will be reading and viewing the following:

The Bible, Book of Exodus and later selected excerpts.

Herman Melville, selected stories, including "Bartleby"

Franz Kafka, "In the Penal Colony."

Snow – Orhan Pamuk

Neuromancer – William Gibson

Leo Tolstoy – Great Short Works, including Hadji Murad and Ivan Ilyich

Eugene Zamiatyin – We

Jose Saramago – Blindness

Jack Henry Abbott – In the Belly of the Beast

Fernando Verissimo – Borges and the Eternal Orangutans

J.M. Coetzee – The Life and Times of Michael K

Law Lit, by Thane Rosenbaum, selections

Mario Vargas Llosa – Who Killed Palomino Molero?

Francisco Goldman – The Art of Political Murder: Who Killed the Bishop?

Films: Battle Royale, others, including I hope some new releases.

My Law and Literature reading list

Bible, Book of Exodus

William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

Ambler, Eric, A Coffin for Dimitrios

Henry James, The Turn of the Screw

Saramago, Jose, Blindness

Jack Henry Abbott, In the Belly of the Beast

J.M. Coetzee, The Life and Times of Michael K

Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. Chronicle of a Death Foretold

Kafka, Franz, Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories, translation by Neugroschel

Verissimo, Luis Fernando, Borges and the Eternal Orangutans

Year’s Best SF9, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer

White, T.H. The Once and Future King

Great Short Works of Leo Tolstoy, Perennial Library edition

Glaspell’s Trifles, on the web

Moby Dick, excerpts, on the web, the parts of the common law of whaling

Javier Cercas, Soldiers of Salamis

Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49

Depending on time we will view some movies, start by buying Double Indemnity.

The reading list is much changed.  There are fewer classics, more genre fiction, and more Latin fiction.   On the plane back from Miami I reread Eric Ambler’s Coffin for Dimitrios; few people know this novel but it is one of the best spy/detective stories, period.

My Law and Literature class today

Today I start my Law and Literature class, my reading list is here.  If you are wondering what I am excerpting, from the Bible we are doing Exodus, Deutoronomy, and Job,
from Melville we are doing "Bartleby," and from Kafka we are doing "In
the Penal Colony."  All are favorites of mine.  Check out the list for
the rest plus five films.

By the way did you know the following?

Students asked to watch five seconds of soundless videotape of a
teacher in the classroom came up with evaluations of the teacher’s
effectiveness that matched those given by his own students after a full
semester of classes.

The link is here, already supplied by Alex immediately below.

Minimum wage laws during a pandemic

From Michael Strain at Bloomberg:

In July 2019, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated that a $15 minimum wage would eliminate 1.3 million jobs. The CBO also forecast that such an increase would reduce business income, raise consumer prices, and slow the economy.

The U.S. economy will be very weak throughout 2021. The nation will need more business income, not less; more jobs, not fewer; and faster, not slower, economic growth. A $15 minimum wage would move the economy in the wrong direction across all these fronts.

I fully agree, and in fact would go further.  On Twitter I wrote in response to Noah:

Surely in a pandemic these businesspeople are right and the accumulated non-pandemic research literature doesn’t apply so much, right? Pretty much all models imply we should cut the minimum wage, if only temporarily, for small business at the very least.

Put in whatever exotic assumptions you wish, a basic model will spit out a lower optimal minimum wage for 2020-21, again for small business at the very least.  This is the advice that leading Democratic economists should be offering to Biden.

Congratulations to the George Mason University School of Law

From a School of Law email and press release:

George Mason University today announces pledges totaling $30 million to the George Mason University Foundation to support the School of Law.  The gifts, combined, are the largest in university history. The gifts will help establish three new scholarship programs that will potentially benefit hundreds of students seeking to study law at Mason.

In recognition of this historic gift, the Board of Visitors has approved the renaming of the school to The Antonin Scalia School of Law at George Mason University.

“This is a milestone moment for the university,” said George Mason University President Ángel Cabrera. “These gifts will create opportunities to attract and retain the best and brightest students, deliver on our mission of inclusive excellence, and continue our goal to make Mason one of the preeminent law schools in the country.”

Mason has grown rapidly over the last four decades to become the largest public research university in Virginia. The School of Law was established in 1979 and has been continually ranked among the top 50 law programs in the nation by U.S. News and World Report.

Justice Scalia, who served 30 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, spoke at the dedication of the law school building in 1999 and was a guest lecturer at the university.  He was a resident of nearby McLean, Virginia.

…The gift includes $20 million that came to George Mason through a donor who approached Leonard A. Leo of the Federalist Society, a personal friend of the late Justice Scalia and his family.  The anonymous donor asked that the university name the law school in honor of the Justice. “The Scalia family is pleased to see George Mason name its law school after the Justice, helping to memorialize his commitment to a legal education that is grounded in academic freedom and a recognition of the practice of law as an honorable and intellectually rigorous craft,” said Leo.

The gift also includes a $10 million grant from the Charles Koch Foundation, which supports hundreds of colleges and universities across the country that pursue scholarship related to societal well-being and free societies.

Most of all, I would like to congratulate Dean Henry Butler and also President Cabrera and Provost Wu.

As someone who has now taught (part time) at the Law School for over a decade, I simply love the quality and curiosity and drive of the students.  I am delighted to see this may get bigger and better yet.  And the leadership at the School of Law has long seen legal training as the true place to get a liberal arts education appropriate for the modern world.

Law of demand sentences to ponder

Adam Ozimek writes:

First, some look at the minimum wage literature and conclude that employers’ demand for low-skilled workers isn’t responsive to wage changes. However, there is relatively widespread agreement that the EITC increases labor force participation, which can be true only if employers are responding to lower wages by hiring more.

Immediately thereafter he makes a good point on the claim that EITC and minimum wages are “complementary” policies:

For a “complementary” minimum wage to prevent lower wages, it must also prevent the added labor force participation. In other words, lower wages are why employment goes up. If you stop the low wages, you stop the employment gains.

Do read the whole thing.