Black ebola markets in everything

A black market for an Ebola treatment derived from the blood of survivors is emerging in the West African countries experiencing the worst outbreak of the virus on record, the World Health Organization said.

The United Nations health agency will work with governments to stamp out the illicit trade in convalescent serum, WHO Director-General Margaret Chan told reporters today in Geneva, where the organization is based. There is a danger that such serums could contain other infections and wouldn’t be administered properly, Chan said.

The WHO is encouraging the use of properly obtained serum to treat current patients and said last week it should be a priority. A third U.S. missionary worker who was infected with Ebola in Liberia and flown to the U.S. for medical care was treated with blood transfusions from another American who recovered from the virus last month. Doctors hope the virus-fighting antibodies in the blood help the 51-year-old physician, Rick Sacra.

There is more here, and for the pointer I thank John Chilton.

Comments

Amazing, I was just thinking whether antibodies from survivors could be used in such a fashion. Unfortunately, since you cannot patent this easily, it was just a wasted thought. Now imagine an improved Ray's Patent Office of the future: you would file your claim, without examination, and a working sample of your invention, and then if later it turns out to be useful you would get either a government minimum prize with mandatory licensing or you could fight it out in Ray's Improved Patent Circuit Court. And GDP would explode. See if I'm first...

It was tried in one of the earlier ebola outbreaks and deemed successful. But then in subsequent outbreaks it had no significant impact on survival. That's why it wasn't talked of earlier. In fact, one of the doctors who got the very limited test drug was also given blood serum from a survivor first.

The "invention" is easy. The "innovation" is hard - making the invention work. Or harder abandoning it when it does not work. For the latter, double blind tests are required.

@mulp- the correctness of my proposal does not depend on the efficacy of my hypothetical example. Perhaps, as the immune response is complex (T-cells, stem cells, passive immunity, active immunity and all that), maybe a crude blood serum would only work on some fraction of the population, but still be helpful. Anyway, I'm all in favor of actual reduction to practice rather than a 'paper patent', as I outlined above. In a paper patent, you can posit using a rocket to go to the moon, but in an actual reduction to practice, you have to build the rocket, which is much harder. Perhaps the paper patent person could get some limited reward however, to encourage lone geniuses who lack capital to invent.

What you will get, like what we have now, is lots of IP.

@ TA-G--right. That's what we want, more IP, less trade secrets. Remember, the Persians had electro-plating and batteries but they was lost (speculative), the Greeks had a form of computer (Antikythera mechanism) as well as calculus (using geometry) that was lost, the Chinese invented a heavier than air glider that was lost, as well as gunpowder, the printing press, and a form of super-strong, shatter-proof ceramic that was lost, and the Romans had concrete (lost, then reinvented in Medieval ages). We need more IP in the form of patents and less in the form of trade secrets. And those are just the things we are aware of. Do the Nazca lines of Peru have aeronautical significance? Why is there a strong nexus between Japan prehistoric pottery and South American pottery? Did all primitive cultures independently come up with pyramids or did they communicate with one another? We don't know since it was all trade secret.

Just like "use someone's antibodies," the devil is in the details.

Cocktail hour in the Philippines?

+12. Twelve hours ahead of DC that is.

Black Ebola markets or Ebola black markets?

the proper nomenclature is african american

Where is all the invention and innovation promised by all the drug patent laws to deliver high profits?

Instead a drug company is taking its dementia drug that seems to work off the market and telling doctors to prescribe its similar drug with time release or something covered by newer patents. The idea is to switch patients before the generics hit the market in a year so Medicare will be paying the higher drug prices in a year for the patented drug using borrowed money so the patent expiring does destroy wealth when the drug company profits sink by a billion dollars causing a $50-100 billion drop in market cap.

tam akülü istif makinasıam surprised that crosswords and scrabble are male dominated at the elite level. I thought those are games games have a stronger culture of women players and that women both prefer them and are better at them than men yarı manuel istif makinası Instead a drug company is taking its dementia drug that seems to work off the market and telling doctors to prescribe its similar drug with time release or something covered by newer patents. The idea is to switch patients elektrikli caraskal

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