How popular is Occupy Central?

A poll last week by the Chinese University of Hong Kong showed that 46.3% of the city’s residents opposed Occupy Central while 31.3% supported it. But the group has more support among the young. According to the poll, 47% of people under 24 back Occupy Central compared with 20.9% of those ages 40-59.

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Comments

I think you, Tyler Cowen, should take the lead in Occupy Central and become a foreign agent provocateur, which has a storied history in Communist countries. Then you should get kicked out of the country, after causing an international incident. Imagine the spike in readership of your already popular blog! And why not? What's the downside? I don't see any. How many times are you going to visit HK or China anyway? People respond to incentives, so why not? The only thing I see working against this is the students themselves may rebel at having a foreigner lead them, since they might not look patriotic.

Tyler should still take some time to have some good meals there before being booted. Hey, the food their might even beat that of the N. Virginia strip mall.

Seems like you comment with long paragraphs every post these days. Maybe join unz with your own blog.

"Ronald Keeva Unz (born 1961 in North Hollywood, Los Angeles) is a former businessman and political activist, ...in November 2013, Unz launched the website The Unz Review, a blogging platform."--seems like that site gets less traffic than here, so what's the point of that?

What, is China so insecure that foreigns cannot even comment on the facts of what is happening there?

Who would support such an insecure system that its residents cannot even make their views known?

What, is China so insecure that foreigners cannot even comment on the facts of what is happening there?

Who would support such an insecure system that its residents cannot even make their views known?

A poll about last week's plan for a protest is a completely different animal than an opinion on what's actually been happening over the last 48 hours.

The current protests aren't synonymous with Occupy Central. In fact, many striking students were upset at Occupy Central organisers moving in on their community.

The current protests are much broader than either of these groups, with the greatest consensus being that the Chief Executive should resign because of the use of tear gas on a peaceful, constitutionally-legal, student protest. My guess is this has 80% community support.

Sounds like you need to be reeducated Paul, airplane style.

If popularity is important, look at the population pyramid before getting lost in percentages. http://goo.gl/cPTqQ7

Thus, approx 2.4 million between 40-59 and only 860K 15-24 years old. Those youngs must make a lot of noise to effectively overcome their minority condition.

Further to Paul in HK's point:

http://bloodandtreasure.typepad.com/blood_treasure/2014/09/concentration-dispersal-resistance-in-hong-kong.html

" 46.3% of the city’s residents opposed Occupy Central"

I don't believe that almost half of the residents of HK are even aware of its existence, much less 77.6%.

Better summary: in a country that jails political dissidents, 31.3% of poll respondents were willing to admit in a survey that they supported Occupy Central.

There have yet been a single case of a political dissident jailed in Hong Kong. If there were, that would cause a much bigger uproar.

If there is a crackdown, will other countries grant asylum? Only to the wealthy?

No country wants to offend China by offering asylum to political dissidents. The political classes are too cowardly.

I figure that Hong Kongers who will Occupy Central would fit in quite well over here. They are probably very well mannered and would not feel a need to protest or get involved unless the government were persistently infringing on important determinants of freedom.

We should make it easy for Hong Kong youth to claim some sort of special status, knowing that it is very possible that they will be blacklisted from many positions if/when the CCP comes to dominate political processes in Hong Kong rather than taking advantage of the opportunity to engage in a Chinese experiment in democracy.

Exactly, one way to counterbalance the effects of so many low skill immigrants from uneducated backgrounds is to bring in high skill middle class political refugees. The sort who don't immigrate until shoved.

I am not being facetious here, but when you meet successful and elite minorities, those from political refugee backgrounds are found far above their proportion in the general population of their ethnic group.

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