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4. I'd like to comment on this, but ...

It is difficult to understand what is going on In Europe wrt. To Greece.

It should be plainly apparent that :

A) Greece has no intention to pay back the debt it owes

B) Greece is only interested in extracting more resources from the EU

All holders of Greek bonds (afaik, most the ECB, but really it doesn't matter) should realize that they are worth nearly nothing at this point. The existing bonds should not be used in the calculus for future action since in all likely futures those bonds are nearly worthless.

Without the bonds, there is little reason for the EU to continue send resources to Greece. Yes there will be some costs to the EU to reorganize what little trade there is from Greece, but that shouldn't be overly expensive. Yes, there will be the cost of working out how a member state actually leaves the Euro and/or the EU. But that law should be drawn up anyway.

Finally, it is likely that there will be a tremendous cost to the Greek people. But this is what they wanted. They voted for this. Who are the EU governors to say that what they want is wrong? That is tremendously paternalistic.

Alain, could you tell me how I could bet against Greece paying back their loans, a way to turn this into a moneymaker for me? Thanks.

Short GGGB10YR?

Both A and B are wrong. The correct assumption should be that Greece is not able to pay back the debt, because it is not capable to.

5. Eschaton is apocalyptic theology - the end is near; be afraid, terribly afraid, and be prepared. Whatever. A well-known Yale religious studies professor, when he was a seminary student long ago, belonged to a band with fellow seminarians they called the Eschatones. The problem with religious "thinkers" like Voegelin is they lack a sense of humor. You're born, you make do, you get old and ugly, and you die. Get over it.

Wouldn't you call Voegelin "anti-eschatonic?" I'm confused on what the point is of your (ironically) humorless comment.

Matthew is at once the most Jewish of the Gospels and the most antisemitic: the Gospel of Matthew doesn't reject Jewish Law, it intensifies it, yet it charges Jews with deicide. Paul rejected his own Judaism because he couldn't live up to its aspirations. Luther rejected his own Catholicism because he couldn't live up to its aspirations. Today's Christianity has been dumbed down to the point it's devoid of aspirations and is narcissistic. Voegelin criticizes "secular salvationist doctrine" in much the same way as Paul criticized Jewish Law and Luther criticized Catholic doctrine. We're born, we make do, we get old and ugly, and we die. Aspirations are all we have.

rayward February 22, 2015 at 2:45 pm

Matthew is at once the most Jewish of the Gospels and the most antisemitic: the Gospel of Matthew doesn’t reject Jewish Law, it intensifies it, yet it charges Jews with deicide.

Well no one hates Jews like other Jews .....

Paul rejected his own Judaism because he couldn’t live up to its aspirations. Luther rejected his own Catholicism because he couldn’t live up to its aspirations. Today’s Christianity has been dumbed down to the point it’s devoid of aspirations and is narcissistic.

Sorry but are you trying to be ironic? You follow two points dumbed down to the point they are devoid of aspirations and even narcissistic with a criticism of modern Christianity for being dumbed down? Paul did not reject Judaism because of some Californian-style toucy-feely self esteem bullsh!t. He rejected it because God appeared to him. A bit hard to ignore or reject. Nor did Luther reject Catholicism because his Mother did not potty train him or whatever you are claiming. He did so because he saw Catholicism as *too*easy*. He wanted something harder to live up to. Something more worthy of, in his eyes, respect.

But you are right about modern Christianity.

I don't think he's familiar with Voegelin's work. But Voeglin isn't anti-eschatology I imagine he believed/ believes that the world will pass away when Chrits returns. The important part isn't the eschaton but the immanance. He was an anti-immanance thinker.

Anti-eschatonic. Is that escha-harmonic?

Eschaton is also the best way to encourage critical thinking and accurate lob technique among promising young tennis players.

6. Buy ink. It's all very well to argue Greece should behave responsibly, but the Greeks voted for irresponsibility. If they don't get it from Syriza, they'll throw Syriza out.

1 I've studiously avoided everything to do with the book and movie, but this is a great read.

I rarely agree with Krugman about anything but I think he's right on this one. The Greeks got more money now and no conditions imposed now. In four months maybe they can repeat the trick.

Well, apart from the fact the deal hasn't actually been approved by the German, Dutch, Finnish, or Estonian legislatures, and that Syriza has presented its plans for collecting 7 billion euros this year from the sort of people who used to be so well represented in the previous Greek governments.

I really enjoyed 1 but then made the mistake of reading some of his other pieces and discovered what a fuckwit he was. Or to put it another way the kind of empty posturing that he attempts to skewer in this review is in fact his stock in trade.

Google search for "Do Not Cite or Circulate" filtered for filetype PDF gets 4,890 hits.

For comparison, searching for "incompetant" with no filtering for filetype gets 286,000 hits, mostly people calling other people "incompetant". "incompetant idiots" gets 6,480 hits.

4890 6480 hmm

To what extent has the advent of Technogenic Climate Change begun to undermine the pretenses of Western, contemporary utopian political practice with evidence that our sciences introduce the dynamics of irrational and uncontrollable processes ("natural" and "political") at every step that they insist upon imposing rational structures and categories upon the entire breadth and depth of human experience?

Any deal that possibly gives Greece more money for promising to pay back unpayable debts is probably a good deal for Greece. Having said that, there really isn't a deal yet, so Krugman is jumping the gun just a bit.

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