How to revive North American manufacturing

If you are confused, here is background context.

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Hard to be sure, but it looks like they could have fitted to covers on each sheet by printing it rotated by 90 degrees. Part of the manufacturing revitalization plan? :D

If focus stage is increased, life-style is improved.

Look at all of those buggy whips.

People do seem stubbornly attached to the printed word, though.

Not joking - many are attached because a book will last them a lifetime, and can be easily shared with or given to others - who may also keep those books for their lifetime in turn.

I have books from my grandfather and mother with me still, for example. Very few people I know have kept digital data from even twenty years ago in a format that can be shared as easily as a book today.

Vinyl records are somewhat similar, though whether such fidelity is as reasonable is a different discussion.

The main reason people don't have 20 year old digital data is that buying content in digital-only format was not common 20 years ago. There is no reason to think that the same will be true 20 years from now.

Yes, you are right, though, that physical books still have some advantages, such as sharability. I would also add not being locked into a particular vendor (as you are with Kindle books and many other digital downloads).

'The main reason people don't have 20 year old digital data is that buying content in digital-only format was not common 20 years ago.'

Ah, I was talking about whether someone who made a recording of their child's first words in 1998 would be able to play that recording today. Possibly, of course, and obviously if one no longer possesses something, you cannot access it, whether book or file. However, if you backed that file up on an Iomega Ditto drive, is it playable today, even if you still possess the tape? (Old formats are a fascinating subject on their own, of course.)

'There is no reason to think that the same will be true 20 years from now.'

Currently, Amazon does its best to ensure that a book you buy in digital format can only be read using licensed hardware/software. And it demonstrably has the ability to delete books, as happened with an 'illegal' version of 1984.

Books can last centuries and be just as readable in 2018 as in 1818. We already have real problems reading or accessing the digital data collected from the first space probes in the 1960s.

Seems to me there's every reason to think that in 20 years our current data formats will be obsolete.

Not the ones like PNG or FLAC, or basically anything supported by GPL/free software. Some formats, like simple ASCII text, have already been around for more than 3 decades.

The problem is more in the actual equipment holding the data being compatible in 20 years with the equipment being used that far into the future.

Very open question that, meaning try to buy hardware that supports open standards to the greatest extent possible, and to transfer data to newer hardware on a regular basis.

Yeah, I said formats, but I meant in widely and readily available machine readable forms.

"Very few people I know have kept digital data from even twenty years ago in a format that can be shared as easily as a book today."

Really? Project Gutenberg is going on 50 years old now and has kept digital data in forms that are vastly easier to share than a book. MP3 music files are more than 20 years old now and, obviously, *much* easier to share than vinyl records. For images, the JPG format is over 20 years old. I don't quite have 20-year-old digital images I took personally yet, but I do have scanned digital images of family photos going back to the early 20th century -- which are both much cleaner and much more shareable than the printed originals.

A book is decor after you’ve read it

'Really?'

Actually, yes - you do not need anything but literacy to read a printed book, which is not the case with a digital text file.

'easier to share than vinyl records'

Well, sure, after the RIAA gave up endlessly suing people for sharing files. Something they could never do legally with a vinyl record. Of course, a vinyl record is basically degraded each time it is played, and a FLAC file isn't.

'which are both much cleaner and much more shareable than the printed originals'

And hopefully were not archived using an Iomega Ditto drive.

There is no question that digital files have advantages. But first, you need a digital device to be able to benefit from those advantages. This is not true of a book, though obviously a vinyl album does require a device to play.

However, this is not an attack against digital data, it is merely to point out that the book has a variety of longevity and accessibility that digital devices have not demonstrated in their relatively short existence.

"Actually, yes - you do not need anything but literacy to read a printed book, which is not the case with a digital text file."

And that was a reasonable argument when digital devices were rare and expensive. Now, single textbooks can cost more than a mid-range smart phone, so that's moot. And what you need to read a printed book is to have it with you. My entire digital book library is virtually always with me wherever I go.

"the book has a variety of longevity and accessibility that digital devices have not demonstrated in their relatively short existence."

The longevity of books is challenged by the need to store and transport them as well as physical deterioration. My own bookshelves are full. One of the reasons I now greatly prefer digital is that I have no more space on the shelves. When my wife and I die or move to a retirement home someday, I doubt very much that my kids (or, hopefully, eventually grandchildren) would be interested in more than a handful of my books, and I doubt they're going to want boxes full of 35mm prints and negatives. But I'm pretty sure they'll all be happy to take a digital copy of all the family photos.

I guess ideally they should make Solarpowered Amazon kindles that work well offline. If they are made to be really durable they could fully replace books.

Well, be careful about confusing the file format with the media it's stored on. A couple of examples here (although I did get an annoying pop-up from this page)

https://resources.infosecinstitute.com/digital-dark-age-information-explosion-and-data-risks/

"NASA suffered a digital dark age problem with their early space records. For over a decade, magnetic tapes from the 1976 Viking Mars landing were unprocessed because the data was stored in an unknown file format. It took NASA many months to solve the problem by analyzing the recording machine’s functionality. The BBC’s Doomsday Project of 1986, intended to record the state of the nation for posterity, was recorded on two 12inch videodisks. By 2000 it was obsolete and unreadable, since the computer capable of reading the format had become rare. "

There's also the (possibly apocryphal) story about NASA records from the Mercury or Apollo missions at the Library of Congress; by the late eighties, IBM had to rebuild the kit from scratch to allow the magnetic media to be read. I'm aware of firms retrieving backups from climate-controlled archival storage in the '90s to discover they no longer have the hardware to read it; of projects where printing everything out and storing the paper was under serious consideration, of projects where retrieving archives on microfiche and converting to modern media were completed.

Call it virtue signalling mood affiliation, but I'm still confused what this has to do with reviving North American manufacturing - it isn't as if such a printing facility would be facing a problem if any one particular title is available or unavailable (particularly considering how much of such a facility's output will be pulped anyways). Basically, this just looks like a basic printing/warehouse facility to me, pretty much the size of local companies in this region in Germany, though larger than the print shop that used to be down 123 that printed GMU's Gazette and various other PR media a couple of decades ago. (What, is anyone under the illusion that any University paid for faculty newspaper is allowed to print whatever it wants without prior departmental approval?)

More interesting would be a shot of an Amazon server room - the future is in the cloud, isn't it?

Umm, pretty sure Tyler was joking.

Straussians have a sense of humor?

As you are the most humorless person on the internet, it is not surprising you do not understand when others engage in it. Although Art Deco/Teaching Spastics is very much in your league there.

He is advocating that people purchase his book, lots of them.

Well, that certainly seems to be a joke, right?

If Stubborn Attachments is 100% Made in America, where the previous books were printed and bound?

For the opposing view, here is Joseph Stiglitz reviewing the recent book Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/20/books/review/winners-take-all-anand-giridharadas.html

Could not understand what Tyler is conveying even after reading the "background context". Can someone please enlighten me

Cowen definitely has a sense of humor. He is doing good by donating his earnings from the book to a man in Ethiopia who wishes to open a travel agency. Based on Cowen's immediately preceding blog entry about the world's busiest air routes, I wouldn't encourage one in America to open a travel agency. For aspiring entrepreneurs, the message isn't "go west, young man", it's "go east, young man".

One of the good lines in the underrated film "Looper" is when Jeff Daniels says to the young protagonist, who wants to live his life and make his fortune in Paris: "Forget Paris. Do Shanghai. I'm from the future, believe me, Shanghai."

There's nobody in the photo. Capitalism thrives when it's dynamic, competition being the harsh reminder to the complacent. Reviving American manufacturing won't come from the elites at the top (read the review by Joseph Stiglitz I linked in my comment above), but from the enterprising men and women who are willing to begin anew at the bottom. Unlike Americans who expect American business to provide good jobs with rising wages, Cowen's friend in Ethiopia has no such expectations because there never was a time in his place to create such expectations. This may seem trite, but the America of the past is gone. What capitalism demands is a little more Scarlett O'Hara in us: "As God is my witness, as God is my witness they're are not going to lick me. I'm going to live through this and when its all over, I'll never be hungry again. No, nor any of my folk. If I have to lie, steal, cheat, or kill, as God is my witness I'll never be hungry again."

Everything of the past is gone. And unlike the war-devastated South of Scarlett O'Hara, Americans are as well-off as they've ever been. Trite indeed.

ahí está nuestro libro.
¿los Doritos anaranjados matan camélidos peruanos?
https://www.mydaytondailynews.com/Lifestyles/Pets/Florida-alpaca-Dies-After-Motorist-feeds-Doritos-Cheese-NIPS-Peanuts/rtYG6cYAJxIOmEOVqgvw0L/

looks like an excellent book.
nobody can revive the south american vicugna pacos
after it eats the orange doritos

I'm not yet over the phrase "a free society", being the one where the only way one man doesn't starve is thanks to the altruism of a rich guy.

Quite the opposite of that, right? Free societies create prosperity for all. It's cliched, but the poor now are obese, not starving.

Not in Ethiopia.

Thanks, but I've already read that page.

:-)

He should have spoiled the ending instead.

How Keynesian of you. Perhaps we can further advocate people generously pay each other to dig ditches and fill them back in again. For the sake of the economy, of course.

God help us when we no longer desire to hold books in our hands and read them with our eyes. That goes double for eating food. And triple for embracing a romantic partner.

Who moved my cheese?

Meanwhile, this is how they do it Germany.

https://www.ndr.de/nachrichten/niedersachsen/oldenburg_ostfriesland/Jetzt-live-Saubere-AIDAnova-verlaesst-Baudock-,aidanova142.html

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