Sunday assorted links

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#4. I own only 7 of this particular 100. Would it be a waste of time to listen to the other 94?

I'm thinking Brittany Spears. Really? Maybe. I do admire her work ethic if not her music.

I've tried Kanye before. And Lamar. My ear is just not trained to them.

Eminem. Okay. I think I've heard MM here and there. I'll skip him for now.

Two Amy Winehouse albums I guess I can get through.

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Yes.

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I noticed that list has choices from Africa and the Middle East while ignoring the whole of Asia and Latin America. Best albums don't come from where most of humanity lives?

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Now let's do the top 100 albums of 1968 and see how the lists compare.

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4. 'but mostly a good list' - if you feel that the record industry is what determines good music to list.

I guess you're thinking those tunes you hum while in the shower are undiscovered masterpieces? Reminds me of that Jim Croce song Workin' At the Car Wash Blues: "...For workin' at this end of Niagara Falls / Is an undiscovered Howard Hughes"

See below for Glenn Mercer - I completely stand behind the suggestions concering Shephin Meerrit and Sigur Ros. And Stephin Merrit is eminently hummable just about anywhere, even if Sigur Ros isn't.

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No. I think great music should have more going on then a computer generated beat and loop repeated over and over again with someone talking or attempting to sing over it. Harmony, melody AND rhythm combined with musical talent and vision is what makes great music. Not catchy copy and pasted loops and beats.

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The album of course is a declining art form in the 21st century. I listen to pop music and I listen to individual songs on spotify. For most of the songs on my playlist, I probably could not even name the album it comes off of.

Is that your fault or the artist's fault?

it just is what it is. If you produced a sensible list of the best 10 albums of all time, how many would come from this Guardian list?

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What if 60% of a government-spending 40% of GDP was distributed equally to all by means of an unconditional universal basic income? Would that classify as a Hayekian welfare tax?

http://myubi.blogspot.com/2017/01/my-universal-basic-income.html

Do central bankers distribute to too-big-to-fail banks "universal basic income?"

Does the government already distribute about that much, only not to all citizens or uniformly??

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1. Nothing particularly new, but the study does confirm what's commonly believed about the growth of left-wing philanthropy and right-wing philanthropy. Left-wing philanthropy had the disadvantage of limited funding but the advantage of support from left-leaning academia. Right-wing philanthropy had the advantage of almost unlimited funding, but made their mark by compromising both academia and think tanks with massive amounts of funding. As between ideas and money, money prevails. That's not to say that right-wing philanthropy doesn't have good ideas, it's just that those ideas have been overwhelmed by the influence money: does anybody actually believe the ideas promoted by schools and think tanks funded by billionaires, when said billionaires have so much at stake personally with the ideas they are promoting and funding? The fight between left-wing philanthropy and right-wing philanthropy is not a fair fight.

Wealthy right wing billionaires like the Koch brothers fund free market ideas. Whether they do so out of altruism or self interest actually isn’t relevant.

The evidence suggest STRONGLY that life with mostly free markets, good government, good courts, some from of social safety net, and less rather than more regulation produces a ton of economic growth.

The more regulated economies continue to fall way behind the more free market ones. There is evidence to prove that.

Doesn’t mean that laissez faire is right, all regulation is bad, or the welfare state should be dismissed. But billionaire business men promoting ideas of mostly free market economics isn’t exactly lunacy considering the EXTREME evidence!

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#4 “Merrill Nisker grafted sweaty, human filth on to the clean machine”
Doesn’t sounds like music to me. But the rest of the list is great!

That music pales in comparison to the great Tom Petty however...

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The only way to tell what is the best "classical music" composed in the 21st century is to see what is still performed a hundred years from now.

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#4. For a top 100 of the last 20 years, surprising how much of this is either forgettable or already forgotten.

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#4 I consider that a pretty poor list. 3 of the best lyricists of the 21st century (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, and Conor Oberst) all completely unrecognized.

Aiming for hipness and diversity, they've also completely ignored all the fine metal pouring out of Scandinavia.

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#4: I know I will sound like a snob, but this looks like a list of "The top 100 albums that sold over one million copies" or "The top 100 mainstream albums." Good music, I can hardly argue with any of the entries, but wow is this mass-market pop. That is not a criticism, just an observation that this is a real middle-of-the-market list. Okay, kudos re Anthony and the Johnsons. But no Owen Pallett? No Stephin Merritt? No Micachu? Even Sigur Ros? Sunn O?

I agree, though I don't listen to music, cannot name a single Kayne West song (nor even remember a chord) and can only recall that one Blue-sy pop hit by Amy Winehouse before she died. Notice however Amy was prescient, sporting a "Blake" hairpin in the photo (another so-called artist I can't recall, but my hot gf half my age I'm sure knows them all).

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It's not that simple. Low made the list. Coldplay and U2 didn't.

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#5 - GMs live longer. In other studies, GMs have higher IQs, chess helps prevent dementia, chess is as physically taxing as running a marathon, chess develops logical thinking, and chess taught in schools makes for better students. None of the above however is significant at the Z=2.576 level (or even 1.960 level).

Chess is only physically taxing because the participants are wimpy cucks.

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3. Hayekian welfare states.
---

Government sometimes runs a good business. The key is everyone agrees on the uncertainty of delivery.

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... study Astrology intensely -- its approach to science & self-deception is near identical to ClimatChange/AGW

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4. Good grief that's an awful list filled with simplistic popular unmusical garbage.

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#4..Pretty sure Benji by Sun Kil Moon and Black Radio by Robert Grasper are better than those chosen.

Glasper

What instrument does he play?

Glasper it should have been. Thanks for the correction, I think. Piano.

Keyboards, more precisely. The awesome Casey Benjamin was in that band. Listen to their rendition of Smells Like Teen Spirit.

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Yesterday's Peggy Noonan column in the WSJ was about what "Everybody Knows" but is rarely said. In classical music, "everybody knows" that new music (late 20th century and contemporary) is a thing to be endured rather than enjoyed.

It's painful to see this magnificent art form, its orchestras, its concert halls, its tens of thousands of skilled players -- three centuries of cultural capital, squandered in sparse, squealing cacophony.

Where is the new music that quickens the pulse, arouses the intellect, or stimulates the loins? Where is the music that loves its audience, and wants to seduce it, hug it, drive it mad?

Peggy Noonan. She's an ass. Elliott Carter is a great composer. "Everybody Knows" sounds like a lazy knucklehead who can't stand subtitles and wants poetry to be confined to odes and limericks. Sorry I can't bow down to your incisive critique, Faze.

"Peggy Noonan. She's an ass. "

Not a substantive rebuttal.

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For many years the composer Kyle Gann wrote music reviews and essays for the Village Voice, which have been collected in a book "Downtown music". A central theme of the book is that there are indeed interesting and accessible modern classical composers, but that they are relegated to having the music performed in abandoned lofts (downtown music). Good classical music still gets played in midtown, at Julliard, while in uptown you can only hear "creepy" atonal music, as Philip Glass put it.

This was in the 80s, I think. It would be interesting to hear what the current situation is. If this Guardian list is representative, then one would expect to find opera and sexual perversion over-represented in modern classical music. However, having spent a few years recently hanging around composers in their 30s and 40s, I'm skeptical that this list is representative.

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#4- they're missing 3 maybe 4 Bob Dylan albums. They threw one Bowie in there but this felt like one of those "___ the boomers" mood affiliation type lists. So it's kind of useless.

If it's albums from 2000 on, I wouldn't expect a ton of Boomer types.

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Classical: Personally I'd include Richter's Sleep and probably the Finish opera Ice (Kuusisto/Koivisto)

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#5 The world age groups distributions rescaled for age 15-65+

Age15Plus = 22.03%
Age25Plus = 66.89%
Age65Plus = 11.08%

From https://ratings.fide.com/download.phtml , the 2019 Sept FIDE listed 18,635 chess players with titles and age data,

Age15Plus = 16.40%
Age25Plus = 70.28%
Age65Plus = 11.24%

Thus what is the point of bragging about the FIDE Age65Plus with only positive margin of 0.16 % point. Very few of the surplus FIDE Age25Plus group can gracefully aged into the FIDE Age65Plus group.

Looking only at the number of 1989 grandmasters male and female for 2019 Sept,

Age15Plus = 8.7
Age25Plus = 83.41
Age65Plus = 7.74

For the grandmasters the very high surplus in the Age25Plus group of 83.41% is trimmed to only 7.74% for the Age65Plus group. It seems that chess increases the burn out rate in the prime of the grandmasters. You live longer only when you pass the tests.

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5..... It greatly depends on their endgame technique

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#4 Where are all the White Stripes albums? Or the Killers? You know the albums that people actually listen to.

Are they just too uncool?

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#2: I like the works that Lera Auerbach has composed. But I don't think I've heard any of the pieces on that list so I can't say that her work is as good as theirs.

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