Saturday assorted links

1. “Of all the Sonoma County youth under 18 who have tested positive for coronavirus, a staggering 95% are Latino, a statistic that is again raising concerns over how the virus is disproportionately impacting local Latinos.

2. How is cocaine trafficking doing?

3. Edenville dam failure caught on video.

4. Ten arguments against immunity passports.  I mean…those are the arguments you should make.  But there is no conception that you have to “solve for the equilibrium” if there are no formal immunity passports, and compare the two situations in terms of cost, unfairness, and the like.  In that sense the authors cannot conceive that there needs to be a comparison at all.

5. The New Modality (a forthcoming publication) seeks articles on these topics and particular kinds of writers.

6. Do proponents of moral outrage wish to “sneak up on women”?  That would explain a lot.

7. The import of super-spreaders in Israel.

8. American Interest interview with Larry Summers.  “LHS: There’s a lot of empirical evidence since Keynes wrote, and for every non-employed middle-aged man who’s learning to play the harp or to appreciate the Impressionists, there are a hundred who are drinking beer, playing video games, and watching 10 hours of TV a day.”  It’s a good thing that has nothing to do with subsequent delayed re-employment (also known as “unemployment”), isn’t it?

Comments

It seems a lotore likely that men who express "moral outrage" as a mating strategy (the technical term for this is "soyboy") are getting friend zoned rather than sealing the deal.

It is not a successful strategy in the dating market, so in time they'll adapt. Or die out.

This is why you marry a traditional Latina or Asian qt. The one good thing about third world immigration. Marry a modern White woman and expect to miserably grovel like a dog until she divorces you.

White women were ruined by white men. Give the Latina and Asian qts a couple of generations and they'll behave the same way.

So the problem is white men?

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Lots of Karens on Tinder and Bumble. Their bio inevitably begins with "successful ...". Clearly not a successful strategy. Swipe left. Asian immigrant women are the best, and the most beautiful.

Who cares about the future mating trends? That's for the next generation to solve.

All those Karens were once daddy's little white princess. They could have it all, except ...

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Since the feminizing compounds in soy are largely contained in the oil, and American’s greatest exposure to them is through deep fried fast foods, it’s really the fast food lovers that should be described by the term “soyboy”. For example, if you look at Donald Trump’s physique, the feminizing influence of these foods is obvious. No man in their right mind would eat that stuff.

Butting in with your "well actually" record-correcting is another telltale sign of being a soyboy.

China eats lots of soy and bats. They play Chinese chess. Trump play tic tac toe. Trump eat pool cleaner.

Respond

Add Comment

Ironically, I ride a Harley and have an "I LOVE MEAT" patch on my riding vest.

Well actually, you're still a soyboy, soyboy.

"Soy Capitan".

The rest can live in hunger

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

I hope she sees this bruh.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Your butthurt feelings don't beat their evidence-based study. Soyboys are seeding the next generation.

Well, based on the studies regarding testosterone and sperm count, that doesn't seem very likely either.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Nah we're just undercover machismos. We say "yes honey, that's terrible. We should reunite immigrant families and find good homes for fighting pitbulls". And then when she leaves the room we talk with our boys about the big tits on that waitress. Better to keep the peace.

Boy, it's a good thing they can't vote or appeasement would backfire spectacularly.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

(6) Certainly explains a lot of Evangelical preachers.

Cukservatives and soyboys are raising future generations. Deplorables and incels sulk in misery.

Respond

Add Comment

And college teachers. Wasn’t Simone de Beauvoir making this same argument in 1949 when she observed that women crave men's authority to protect them from their own liberty. Outrage is just another flavor of authority. Women love authoritarians.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

4. The problem is if you use the word "passport" you're right away setting it up as an official document. A passport is the most official and restrictive document there is.

"Letters of transit" has a nice ring.

I prefer 'propiska' myself.

Letters of marque ...

The legal name is Carte Jaune aka yellow card, and they were very common in the past, less so as global infectious disease control and all the very infectious diseases have vaccinations to prevent cross border transmission.

The global agency that sets the standards is the WHO by international consensus. Each nation regulates their endorsements.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#3: "the dam appears to have undergone a slope failure; a failure of its integrity. This should never occur, and to me it suggests that the problems at the Edenville Dam went further than known issues with the spillway."

Am I thinking of the wrong dam? I thought the news reports were telling us that potential failure of the dam's integrity had been a known issue for years -- and that the authorities had been trying to persuade/force the owner to rectify them, without success.

There seem to have been conflicting messages from the authorities. The feds revoked their federal license, but the state rejected the dam owner's requests to lower the lake level, for environmental reasons. Not sure who may have been focused on the condition of the earthworks.

I thought they lowered it because of the concerns and the state sued them to raise it again. Lots of stories I guess. Given Flint though, I wouldn't be surprised.

Respond

Add Comment

Yes, I heard the dam owners were worried about the dam's integrity and lowered the water level by nearly 10 feet. But the drop in level killed freshwater mussels, and the state agencies ordered the water level to be raised. State regulators put mussels over dam integrity it sounds like. The owners maintain that the lower level, they could have safely passed the volume of water the storm dumped.

EPA regulations are clearer than landowner property rights.

If a big corporation with good lobbyists wants to take your property or make your property unusable, you are likely to lose unless you find an endangered species protected by Federal law via specific laws of Congress plus Congress mandated rule making following detailed and specific procedure requiring input from the public, and responses.

But the real issue was that taking of lake front property owner rights:

"Saturday May 2, 2020 7 am -- Wixom Lake Refill Update. --WLA
We are happy to report Wixom Lake refill has progressed during the past week and the lake is now about 6" below the Boyce typical summer level. At this level the majority of lakefront owners should have adequate water depths for placement and normal use of boat hoists and docks.
The Dundas Rd. DNR Launch is now open for use, and the Governor has removed the ban on motorboat use.
We do not have current details on the operational status of lake service businesses. Check ahead to confirm whether they have resumed full operation.
Should you choose to boat on the lake during early May, please be especially wary for floating debris. Sticks, logs and the occasional stump, tree ,or railroad tie dislodged by winter snowmelt are a normal marine hazard early in the boating season.
Be safe, have fun!
Wixom Lake Association"

The lake was a land development venture, which required building a dam, back in 1924. Like Florida coastal land development in the same era required building a railroad to the Keys. Once the land is sold, maintaining the dam or railroad is no longer of interest to the private developers.

To protect property rights after FERC pulled out in 2018, local residents were trying to make Wixom lake subject to Michigan lake level regulation. FERC preempted State law on lake level, etc, which governs most man made lakes in Michigan.

So, do land owners have any rights? And which land owner right override other landowner rights?

And what duty does private capital have to protect landowners its capital profited from in the past and now impacts?

Environmentalists would debate this dam and might argue for its removal, as they are doing for thousands of other dams in the process of removing them.

Note, the estimated cost to taxpayers in repairs of taking over the dams of the four lakes the Wixom Dam owner ran was a hundred million. But the price for them was $9 million in negotiations, with the income justifying that figure too low to fund 5 million in repairs. We now know the dams were worthless and pure liabilities.

In this case, mussels were proxies for private landowners in the battle for private profit, socialized losses.

+1
This is the way it works.

Respond

Add Comment

> In this case, mussels were proxies for private landowners in the battle for private profit, socialized losses.

Excellent write-up, thanks. So, the upstream forces wanted higher water levels so their boat docks functioned, and were happy to use environmental laws to achieve their goals. And these faux environmental forces didn't give a crap about the safety of those downstream.

Who represented the interests of those downstream?

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

This story has become an unhealthy obsession with me, as every group or person in the recent story is a villain.
Dam was built in 1924 - the bit about it being a property development is news to me, the guy Wixon who had the idea and took a decade to get investors and make it happen was all about cheap electricity to foster economic development according to the history articles. Operating company went bust in the depression, but the same Wixon was appointed receiver, and somehow ended up owning all the stock free and clear at the end of the bankruptcy process.
Mid 1980s, FERC came through and said "we now think this is a navigable river, so this comes under our jurisdiction and you need a FERC license"
Followed shortly by "Oh, yeah, and OBTW you owe fines for all the time since (arbitrary date) when you were operating until now. The federal courts put FERC in its place on that one, but it wasn't an auspicious start to their relationship with federal regulators.
Starting in the 90s, FERC started saying "You know we've got better grasp of what peak rainfall might be coming into the watershed ending up in this reservoir, and your spillways won't pass that much water, which is a big safety concern that must be fixed STAT. (Up until then various inspections by Army Corps etc. thought it was a great operation.)
And also, we decree that a condition of your use of this otherwise navigable river is that you put in portages for canoes to get around your dams, and handicap restrooms at each portage, and the cost of purchasing now really valuable land you need to do that from the current owners who don't want to sell it is is on you also.
Soon after, the original ownership company took a million USD loan from an energy company Synex in BC, didn't make the payments, went chapter 11, and Synex ended up owning the Dams and the company.
Synex put Wolverine in a subsidiary "Synex MI", and sold that to an assortment of WD Boyce trusts, run by descendants of THAT WD Boyce who founded the boy-scouts and was big in the hydroelectric development on Illinois River at Marseilles, Ill.
Reading the names of these trusts in PACER documents is very interesting. I would not be on the other end of a business deal with any of them having done so.
Yet as far as any authorities have said, the dams were still all maintained in a competent manner, even the not-yet-completed study for the state was going to say "Dam's in good shape, but holy cow, the spillway doesn't pass enough water in the event of a 200-year flood, get that fixed!"
The notation of "high failure risk" trumpeted by so many news reports is more correctly described as "low probability, high consequence".
The "Many Many Violations of license conditions" were a) not adding spillway capacity, and b) restrooms, parking lots, handicap toilets, etc. -- lots of continuing violations, but pretty much only the spillway capacity thing was a safety thing.
After the California Oroville spillway failure, FERC pulled the operating license on this one, as the passage of nearing 2 decades of no action on the big safety issue (and the many recreational use issues) would look really bad for them if this failed too. Without FERC license, there is no federal jurisdiction, and the state at first didn't think the spillway thing was important, giving the dam an OK bill of health.
Meanwhile locals who own properties on the various lakes are very upset because the drawdowns necessary for dam inspections and repairs make their lakefront homes not very lakefront. They get a court order that the historic average summer level must be maintained in "boating season", and are partway through getting ownership of the dams and 4 lakes transferred to a local authority, so that the water level can always be good for recreational use and appearance.
Reports from the day of failure are not just high water, but waves from storm winds pushing water up over the edge.
Now that we've some analysis from videos of the failure, I'm suspecting that it wasn't just erosion from overtopping, but a deeper structural failure, so "water level too high for weather conditions" may not really be the cause of the failur even though it was a historic amount of rain that fell in the area.

Respond

Add Comment

Where was the insurance company that is providing liability coverage for this contingency. They are going to be out billions!

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#8: Cosmopolitan upper-middle class dudes signalling their lack of snobbery and Eurocentricism : "What do we need starchy, classical elite culture for? It's overrated (and an stated appreciation of it probably indicates some sort of right wing sympathies). We have Hamilton the Hip-Hop Musical now, right?".

Also them (by implication): "I don't think people should get UBI because they wouldn't spend their increased leisure time enriching themselves with self-improving classical elite culture. Without the firm hand of their bosses enforcing labour discipline on them, they would surely destroy themselves ."

(Or, here, specifically, weird permutations of the above in which it is implied it would be fine if only they spent their time sober and recreating elaborate versions of Indian street food and indulging in obesity, but video games and alcohol are self-evidently clear wastes of time.)

Larry Summers is an angry reactionary in disguise. His contempt for the proles cannot be hidden by phony superlatives against the very elite that he wines and dines with every day.

And he was a great friend of Epstein. When will anybody ask about that?

Who is Epstein?

I have to give credit to internet trolls here. Donald "many of them on the younger side" Trump hired Jeffrey Epstein's former legal team to represent him in impeachment proceedings before the Senate in the very recent past and, somehow, you guys manage to bring the focus on to Bill Clinton, Larry Summers, and the New York Times.

Anecdotally, I rarely if ever see Trump supporters talk about Epstein, as they're aware it's about equally bad for their guy and the other side.

It's usually the young left socialist populists who seem to bring him up, because they don't care about burning the Clintons, Pinker, Summers, NYT (all these liberal establishment type of people) etc.

Uh, no. Years ago in Mar Lago, Trump got a complaint about Epstein and barred him from the resort. The prosecutor looking into it said Trump was the only one who responded to his questions and said he was willing to help. Vastly different than the Clintons and the NYT crowd.

Uh, yes. It's still not good, and the supporters still don't like to talk about it.

Makes Trump look good, to most people. I guess some are pro-pedophile that wouldn't like his actions.

Being friends with a dubious guy for years, then banning him from your resort because it could affect your bottom line, is still worse than not being friends with him at all, and so Trump supporters would prefer not to mention it at all. This is very simple.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

I really don’t like Trump. But it’s well known that he fell out with Epstein years ago after someone complained about him at Mar-a-lago. He was never linked to his shadier activities as far as people can tell. He has many faults but Epstein’s vice doesn’t appear to be one of them.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

We need at least 2-3% GDP growth in order to fund our future obligations like Medicare and SS. So we know from 2011-2013 that UBI would result in suboptimal GDP growth.

The fiscal arguments are fine enough (maybe right, maybe not). I have no issue with that, just those implications like Summers' that it effectively would be best for the working class not to be financially independent, because they do not have the taste to appreciate it such as a tenured gentleman of leisure does.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

>Why are the deaths younger in Brazil?

Because the numbers being reported in Brazil are being faked. Take whatever perverse incentives you have in the USA to over-report deaths, multiply those by 10 and then remove any lingering compunction about corruption and you have Brazil.

The numbers from Brazil are simply not credible at all. I know this because we know nurses working in hospitals that tell us that literally every death in that hospital that is called a Covid death is not.

#9: Is a link to a timeline of sci-fi inventions?

Still without seeing the specific content any deaths in Brazil are most likely younger because people there... are younger on average.

If this is an ask of why a *death rate* may be higher among younger people in Brazil, have the last couple of months of case numbers across different countries having almost no relation to differences in prevalence, taught us nothing? The. Denominator. Is. Not. Reliable. At. All.

Respond

Add Comment

So Brazil is joining the US in running up their numbers to demand reparations from China?

Respond

Add Comment

Ah, Thiago has changed his name to Andrew.

Brazil is by far managing the crisis the worst.

I am not Thiago, and I can tell you that there is something wrong with the numbers, I just don't know what it is. It seems pretty fucking clear that new cases of COVID are not being assigned based on testing, or else Brazil has found a way to identify COVID cases without testing people at all.

Respond

Add Comment

Brazil doesn't manage anything all that well. But I'm curious as to what you think IS happening in Brazil that makes it so much worse than, say, New York City?

At least Brazil doesn't have any nursing homes to shove Covid Positive cases into. So their death rate will be lower than that of NYC.

If their death rate is less, and it manages to get their by spending a Trillion dollars less than they spent in New York, then did they manage it worse than New York?

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

The suboptimal economic growth of 2011-2013 shows how counterproductive never ending extensions of unemployment benefits can be. So the strong economic growth the outbreak ended began in Q2 2014 when Republicans finally put an end to the Obama “stimulus”. So we had a UBI experiment and it wasn’t a disaster but it also undermined GDP growth which is necessary to fund our current welfare system of Medicare, Medicaid, Obamacare, SS, etc.

The only welfare expansion that makes sense going forward is parental leave because in general able bodied adults should be in the job market or caring for family members who can’t care for themselves.

People don't understand the purpose of unemployment benefits.

First, they're mortgage, rent, car payment insurance, not unemployment insurance. Second, paying people not to work means that they're less likely to enter the "gray economy" and compete with their former employer or go to work at a lesser wage with a new competitor of their former employer.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

SNL nailed it.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTMow_7H47Q

Respond

Add Comment

My prediction for the cause of 1.) is obesity, which I think will be the main driver for differences across ethnic groups.

Looking at data from California, Hispanic children are 2x as likely to be obese than non-Hispanic children (https://www.childhealthdata.org/docs/nsch-docs/california-pdf.pdf).

Obesity has a bunch of comorbidities that make COVID19 especially serious in the younger demographic.

How dare you.

It is pretty tasty, too.

And it is California food, not Mexican food. One of my pet peeves, we invented it. The chili in chili relleno, Anaheim, California born and bred. The closed taco, the burrito; we claim them all California food, good stuff.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#1.
The virus is disproportionately impacting those who do not practice social distancing and ignore other health guidelines.
Journalists who have become accustomed to seeing everything through the race lens have a hard time understanding that the virus does not engage in racial discrimination.

The human race is a race you idiot.

Respond

Add Comment

That's why literally 0% of the people cramming into state capitols are non-white then right?

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#9 links to the wrong site (pretty sure).

This might be the link intended to #9: https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2020/05/22/in-brazil-covid-19-hitting-young-people-harder.html

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#8... "There’s a lot of empirical evidence since Keynes wrote, and for every non-employed middle-aged man who’s learning to play the harp or to appreciate the Impressionists, there are a hundred who are drinking beer, playing video games, and watching 10 hours of TV a day."

An unemployment office full of effeminate dandies and fat drunken slobs is worth a field trip when social distancing gets pulled.

Beside being in that nondescript village. Time to make some cheese from his own secretions.

I am

Maybe they have dead contributors

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

The most remarkable thing is that: "for every ONE who is drinking beer, playing video games, and watching 10 hours of TV a day,... [during this gap quarter]... there are TEN that are opening day-trading accounts and blasting market volatility beyond what even those big Trading House AI algorithms have been doing since late February.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

"Are men becoming feminized?"

https://twitter.com/prchovanec/status/1264246188448063489?s=19

(100 years ago today.)

Respond

Add Comment

1. She said many of the cases involving Latinos are occurring in “clusters” of large households, where those who have come in contact with confirmed cases are being tested.

Huddled masses living together is the Progressive 5-year plan for housing in California, so where is the disparate impact analysis?

There are worse things than living in California. You could live somewhere else and think that' s how you have to spend your day.

Respond

Add Comment

How does making it easier to build where there is demand lead to more "huddled masses?"

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#6 That hypothesis was already proposed in 2015 by South Park. I sure hope they properly credited them for the discovery that PC = p**sy crushing.

https://t.co/6bUcM1HKnc?amp=1

Respond

Add Comment

#1. Tyler has to be laughing (or crying) at this article. Wondering why the percentage is so high, you read this:

"Mase said the ethnic disparities being identified among the county’s COVID-19 cases are a serious concern and steps are being taken to do more outreach and testing into the Latino community."

Hello, selection bias self-fulfilling-prophecy! If you do relatively more testing of Latinos, then of course the share of Latinos among the infected will go up. If she gets the percentage to 100%, say by doing more outreach and testing in the Latino community, exactly what will that prove?

Ok, but why are Latinos catching the virus at all, whether in proportionate or disproportionate numbers?

"She said many of the cases involving Latinos are occurring in “clusters” of large households, where those who have come in contact with confirmed cases are being tested."

This makes sense, as an explanation of how people are transmitting the virus. But where does it leave the Sonoma County's public health division's concern for the Latino community? What can they do about Latinos living dangerously in clusters? What? are they going to issue orders to break up families? If nothing, then isn't their pious ethnic concern mere posturing?

The article illustrates how a political attitude that is ultimately patronizing makes a county health department both absurd and useless.

Of course it is just virtue signaling, just like the concern for the most vulnerable, the old: "As California ramps up coronavirus testing of the general population, the state is still about two weeks away from any mandatory testing of its most vulnerable residents: those in nursing homes...About 40 percent of California’s COVID-19 deaths have been of nursing home residents or workers." https://calmatters.org/health/coronavirus/2020/05/coronavirus-testing-california-nursing-homes/

But Democratic politicians insist that they are guided by "science".

Respond

Add Comment

I lived a couple of years in a place with no health departments once.

I got:

lots of shighella or salmonella, whatever name it goes by, distressing gut bacteria, kills little kids but usually not adults.

Roundworms, not too bad.

Histolyzing amoeba, three times. Eats your gut lining and it hurts and you bleed out your ass. About the worst pain ever, next to shingles or, I guess, cancer. They treated it with massive doses of Flagyl, that stuff they use for vaginal yeast here.

Two tapeworms, one of them collectible at about twenty feet long, but she came out in the toilet at work, knocked out by superior French drugs, and there were no lab jars nearby.

A touch of malaria. You don't want malaria, trust me, little libertarian bro. That stuff the president says he takes works well against it, or against the malaria they had back in those days.

Schistosomiasis, but that was a false alarm, so I didn't have to get my blood strained. You've probably never heard of schisto.

Rabies, but I had a good count from the suppressing shots and had to take only fourteen more shots in the abdomen to make sure.

Hope you never have to go anywhere that there isn't a nanny state to take care of you. The real world isn't impressed by the confident blurtings of weak people.

Respond

Add Comment

My impression is that affluent Northern California whites are impressively adept at avoiding CV. I haven't seen much evidence that Hispanics are bad at it, but fewer have work from home jobs, and, especially in a high rent district like Northern California, they have a high density per room, so it's hard for household members to avoid the disease if one member brings it in from the outer world.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#1. Unless this is straight talk about how social norms in the Latino community contribute to the spread of communicable diseases then its a bullshit article.

I've seen too many articles on this topic that talk about how the virus is racist to think its worth checking out myself.

Respond

Add Comment

Lyman Stone on the numbers:

"Here's cumulative deaths and cumulative excess deaths. That's a lot of deaths. When it's all said and done, nobody's gonna be figuring US deaths from COVID at under 100k. And we may already be spittin' distance from 200k, depending on your baseline."

Thread:

https://twitter.com/lymanstoneky/status/1263863852506071041?s=19

How do you get to 200,000 deaths this round?

Apr 11 to Apr 17....2,000 deaths per day on average
Apr 18 to Apr 24.....1,900
Apr 25 to May 1......1,800
May 2 to May 8.......1,600
May 9 to May 15.....1,400
May 16 to May 22...1,300

Colorado said it had over counted Covid-19 deaths by 24%, and we can expect to find that has happened in many states to varying degrees.

If the downward trend continues: 1,200 deaths a day next week, then 1,100, etc., there will be 150,000 U.S. deaths by July 15 with 100 a day.
Oh, have I mentioned Colorado? Take off 20% for over counting and that becomes 120,000+.

Have I mentioned the flu killed 80,000 Americans in 2017/18 and 99% of the population didn't bat an eye?

Respond

Add Comment

Are you using the same data series?

In this thread Stone is using raw death rates, any cause of mortality, and comparing to years prior. That's the safe thing to do with any country's data. They make up the cause wrong but they get the count pretty close to right.

He right hand chart shows a cumulative "excess versus average" of 200,000 for the United States.

But how many excess deaths are caused less by CV than by reactions to CV? E.g., Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California dealt with only about half as many heart attacks in March-April 2020 as in March-April 2019. Was that because there were fewer heart attacks or more people died at home because they were reluctant to go to the hospital?

I don't know. But it's an important question we need to find the answer to.

Respond

Add Comment

Now murderers are trying to blame the coronovarirus for their crimes.
This was to be expected.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

7. "1-10% of infected individuals resulting in
80% of secondary infections."

meanwhile the newyorktimes.com declares "the end of meat is here"

Respond

Add Comment

Actually, there is no reason to believe Brazilian COVID victims are disproportionately young. According to Minister Divisional General Pazuello, Brazil's top healthcare officer, Brazil's COVID-19 victims skew older and sicker (asthmatic, diabetic, cancer patient, obese, etc.) than the general polulation.

Respond

Add Comment

6. That is nothing more than beta left wing guys chasing beta left wing girls. There are so many amazing women in the world, who are much hotter than your average millennial beta woke socialist chick.

Of the top 15 most attractive women in my world, I don’t think any of them would care about PC talk.

I live outside of Orlando, Florida and most Puerto Rican and Venezuelan women that I chase aren’t in tune to that kind of talk. Believe it or not the AOC thing is more a function of her being a north easterner than It is being Puerto Rican.

And the really hot UCF,FSU and SEC girls couldn’t give a rats ass about that stuff. They want to have a good time with their “Brad or Chad.”

P.C.-socialist-SJW-millennial culture is BETA HEAVY. There just isn’t a ton of high end women in that world. Nobody wants to talk about Buzzfeed or Vox at the frat party...

Even in New York and LA, where that world view tends to blend into the center left-rich girl world, it’s not nearly as important to those girls. You know the girl I’m talking about. She lives in the West village, eats at Carbone with her girlfriends, maybe took a course or two on feminism in undergrad, and is DEFINITELY a Democrat but not a socialist. Bagging that chick is gonna take a HELL of a lot more than P.C. virtue signaling.

"That is nothing more than beta left wing guys chasing beta left wing girls. There are so many amazing women in the world, who are much hotter than your average millennial beta woke socialist chick."

You wanna whine?

Not at all. Betas need and deserve love too.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Terry my man, your success at bagging chicks is commendable and duly noted. Everyone here endorses your efforts and applauds your claimed conquests. I, for one, wish I could nail as many hot babes as you do.

But casting your amorous escapades in a political context may be a contextualization too far. There are lots of chicks out there waiting for you to bag them, without reference to beta this or alpha that. You are a true snaky dude who gets the babes, and nobody will ever deny it, but you are limiting your potential life-time count.

Go for all of them, dude-bro!

+1

People who go on with these romance conspiracies are pathetic.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#6

I'd like to believe it, but... "n = 251." Add that with social science, and I wouldn't bet on it replicating, at least not with similar effect sizes.

Respond

Add Comment

1. Isn't the issue preventable deaths? If 100 people will die, does it really matter if its 99 Latinos and 1 white, visa versa or 50-50?

It's time to pull out the big guns on Covid-19.

We need to call it racist and shame it into remission.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

May be a link of interest:

"But a local study has shown that while the patients might test positive, it "does not equate to infectiousness or viable virus"."

Covid-19 patients no longer infectious 11 days after getting sick, research shows
https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/covid-19-patients-no-longer-infectious-11-days-after-getting-sick-research-shows

Respond

Add Comment

8. American Interest interview with Larry Summers.

We should think of a moment when we can borrow for 30 years at an interest rate of 1.3 or 1.4 percent in a currency that we print ourselves as a remarkable opportunity, and it should be our business to take advantage of that opportunity to renew and reconstruct our society.

----
Our debt backlog costs us about 2.25% because we borrowed a ton of dought when Larry said 3% was cheap.

The 1,4% twenty year loan Larry speaks does no address the possibility of twenty years of deflation. It is most likely that 1.4%, after deflation becomes, once again. 2.25% which seems to be the historical rate we pay.

Larry's error? Time is relative. Twenty years seems long but not when everything has slowed way down. Look at velocity, we have been in low gear for quite some time. It took us ten years to get Obamacare working, then came covid, wiped out the effort.

Respond

Add Comment

https://www.newsmax.com/us/ivermectin-drug-virus/2020/05/22/id/968688/

Reports Friday from multiple trials in the United States and abroad indicate a drug already approved by the FDA to treat parasitic infections is showing “astounding” results, and could represent a breakthrough in efforts to vanquishing the SARS-CoV-2 virus at the heart of the global pandemic.

Doctors have administered the drug ivermectin in several simultaneous trials in several countries sometimes in combination with other common medications.

Physicians who participated in the study report that patients’ viral loads began declining almost immediately after they began administering ivermectin, a widely available prescription drug approved to combat parasites, scabies and head lice.

It has not been approved for COVID-19 patients, but doctors familiar with clinical trials described patients’ results as dramatic.

Emergency medical physician Dr. Peter H. Hibberd, M.D., of Palm Beach County, Florida, told Newsmax Friday evening in an exclusive interview that he’s optimistic the drug will prove to be an important therapeutic advance, although he expects more trials will be needed before it wins FDA approval for use as a COVID-19 medication.

He noted it has impressed doctors in clinical trials on multiple continents.
----
Progress.

Respond

Add Comment

https://immunology.sciencemag.org/content/5/47/eaax6085

Targeting overzealous macrophages
Intestinal homeostasis relies on maintenance of a complex set of interactions between intestinal microbiota and the intestinal immune system. Pathogens that colonize the gut invariably disrupt these interactions and promote intestinal inflammation. Here, Corbin et al. have used a mouse pathobiont, Helicobacter hepaticus, that causes inflammation akin to human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to study the role of intestinal macrophages in driving inflammation. Using this model, they found the transcription factor IRF5 to be a critical regulator of macrophage inflammatory potential and that deletion of IRF5 rendered mice resistant to H. hepaticus–driven intestinal inflammation. Their studies propose IRF5 and molecules upstream of IRF5 to be potential drug targets in the treatment of human IBD.
----
A direct macrophage attack on the pathigen is generally good uness it overreacts, then we have a life or death issue.

This research leads to a possible method to interfere with macrophage attacks when deadly, which is most of the covid deaths. I consider this a necessary, last ditch effort.

Respond

Add Comment

Oh well, just thinking that this here site could use a little less post-philosophy-101-class teen thought and bright new belief in introductory statistics, and a little more life experience and knowledge beyond strip-mall noodle yelping.

There's a lot of stuff posted here that could illuminate an undergraduate statistics paper, or sometimes an alternative-press paper on where superior bagged hydrated noodle dishes are served. But after you discount the crusty observances of middle-aged men who make sure they are known to be "engineers", which seems to mean computer programmers, there is very little that has any relevance to the world outside.

Not that there's anything wrong with that. It is what it is.

Respond

Add Comment

6. Do proponents of moral outrage wish to “sneak up on women”?
----
Does he mean faking the affirmative acting thing to get into her panties?

Respond

Add Comment

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-05-24/covid-19-patients-not-infectious-after-11-days-singapore-study?srnd=premium

Covid-19 Patients Not Infectious After 11 Days: Singapore Study

----
They killed the virus after ten days. Good news. Which part of the immune system did the job? I still think it a two part response on our immune system. One more mild affliction and the B cells will be moved to the right tissues, like managing a large pig farm.

Respond

Add Comment

#2 And to think some people say you can't have markets without Governments creating, guilding and regulating, it and make no mistake the great majorty of consumer get what they pay for.

Respond

Add Comment

#6: I first read this as left wing style outrage, but is the opposite of outrage apathy, or something else? Does social conservative style outrage count here (cultural rot, transgender bathrooms)? Maybe women just prefer men with opinions on the matters of the day vs. ignorant or apathetic buffoons?

An Actual Commentator Today in 2020: "I see no plausible middle-ground between SJW outrage and apathy. Calm discussion, simply is inconceivable".

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

1. Covid is highest among migrant workers who live in cramped living conditions. You are not doing them any favors by letting them in this country helter-skelter.

They want to come here and do that.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

#6 The research finds women looking for a long term relationship favour men who express outrage at infidelity. This seems like rational behaviour for a woman. The researches then extrapolate speculatively to all moral outrage which doesn't seem sensible to me.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment