What should I ask Nathan Nunn — Twitter version of this query

I will be doing a Conversation with him, MR readers offered suggestions here, I will tweet a request for queries, please leave them in the comments section of this post.  This post is only for people coming in from Twitter.

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Do you consider yourself an economic historian?

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What does he believe is the reason that rich-country governments don't commit to "Helping by not Hurting?"

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What can America learn from Hanoi Party Secretary Vuong Dinh Hue's achievements?

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What are his thoughts on the current situation in Brazil?

There is no need to ask that. You can buy a newspaper, if you want. All things considered, the situation in Brazil is doubleplusgood. Soccer games resumed, business reopened, the people, under President Captain Bolsonaro's correct leadership, prevailed.

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Much of Nunn's research agenda appears to be intended to test the very interesting model of Africa presented in John Reader's 1997 book: "Africa: A Biography of the Continent" and on the academics upon whom Reader drew, such as Jack Goody and E. Boserup.

I summarized Reader's model of Africa here:

https://www.takimag.com/article/africa_on_the_brink_steve_sailer/

I'd like to hear what aspects of the Reader model of Africa have held up under his testing and what aspects have not.

How can one claim that Africa has no cultural experience with the Malthusian limit and simultaneously claim that high fertility is deeply ingrained in African culture? The presence of the later will quickly bring a population up to its Malthusian limit. The rapid exponential growth in African populations is a recent phenomenon largely due to the sudden influx of new technologies over the past 100-200 years.

You are a smart one Steve, and we expect better.

Huge disease burden whenever density gets too high and more competition with wild animals, especially elephants, than elsewhere.

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Most places in the world, having rivers that are open to ocean going ships, such as the Mississippi watershed, is conducive to economic development. But that can also open up a region to predation, such Northern Europe during Viking times when Vikings would paddle up rivers and loot monasteries.

Some of Africa's rivers open up the interior to riverine trade with the world, while others do not due to waterfalls (e.g., there are huge rapids on the Congo about 60 miles inland from the sea). Did the parts of Africa with accessible rivers benefit economically or were they worse off due to increased slave trade-driven predation?

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His research, particularly Lowes et al (2017) in Econometric, shows that institutions have long run impacts on norms and culture. How does this result stands in a developed country context, in which current state capacity and formal institutions are possibly stronger? Is there a greater crowding-out of ancient societal norms and informal institutions?

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If we assume that the point of applied social science research is not only to interpret the world, but to change it, then what's the point of studying long-run impact of old things? How does it help us find opportunities for positive change?

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Why tatar/crimean slave trade impact to eastern europe and russia is almost non existing vs African slave trade impact to African countries.

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