assorted links

Tuesday assorted links

Monday assorted links

1. Photos from Belarus, interesting in their own right but all the more so now.

2. More comments on the models.

3. The lockdown culture that is Ontario: “19-year-old charged after Mercedes clocked doing 308 km/h.”

4. Two million chickens to be killed because there aren’t enough workers to kill them.

5. Covid-19 has largely spared the baseball world (model this).

6. An argument that all will be well soon enough.  Not my view, but happy to pass along this perspective from Lars Christensen.

Sunday assorted links

1. Where have all the briskets gone?  A good lesson in supply chain economics.  And China to slap big tariffs on Australian barley exports.

2. Scarlett Strong on the updated source code.

3. Falling as a feature of Covid-19.

4. Dithering: a new podcast by Ben Thompson and John Gruber.

5. WHO conditionally backs the notion of Human Challenge Trials for vaccines.

6. Hockey analytics guy contributes to Covid-19 modeling.

7. Toward a theory of how and why UFOs would reveal themselves.

8. How much would you pay for this distanced (Dutch) meal?

9. “Citations for traveling faster than 100 mph have been numerous in recent days.

10. Millie Small, RIP (music video).

11. To be clear, I am not against this kind of article (NYT).  “Sweatpants and Caviar,” but in the paper edition it is called “A Chance to Think About Composing that Opera.”  Still, we can learn a bit from doing a small amount of modeling of how it came about.

12. A sad take, no matter which side you trust, our regulatory state is failing us.

13. “Ethics of controlled human infection to study COVID-19.”  That is what you might call “an establishment piece.”  On one hand, it is nice to see them not reject the idea, though they cannot agree on monetary compensation for exposure.  I wonder how they feel about fishing boats?

Saturday assorted links

Friday assorted links

Thursday assorted links

1. Tips for slowing livestock growth due to plant closures.

2. “The Arizona Department of Health Services told a team of university experts working on COVID-19 modeling to “pause” its work, an email from a department leader shows.

3. Florian Schneider has passed away.

4. Source code for the Imperial College model.  And Sue Denim is very upset about the quality of that source code.  Another reader with a strong technical background wrote me equally critical remarks.  Are there further opinions on this?

5. Sujatha Gidla on her experience with Covid-19 (NYT), and here is my earlier CWT with her, one of my favorite episodes.

6. A new real-time journal COVID Economics.

7. Tankersley interviews Hassett and covers the brouhaha (NYT).

8. Effective Altruist forum ranks Fast Grants as one of their top two projects.

10. Jerry Seinfeld on success.

11. “A county in Washington State dealing with a coronavirus outbreak has identified a confounding new source of spread: “Covid-19 parties” organized so that people can deliberately mingle with an infected person in the hope of getting their own illness out of the way.”  (NYT link)  I wonder what they play for the music.

12. How are the social sciences evolving?  Less rational choice, for one thing.

13. Why are meatpacking plants hit so hard?  Holds true for numerous countries — is it the deliberate circulation of cool air?

14. Emily Oster and Galit Alter have a new Covid public health information site.

Wednesday assorted links

Tuesday assorted links

1. What price Remdesivir?

2. Conor Sen catnip: “For example, people in New York travel 38% fewer total kilometers and visit 14% fewer block-sized areas than people in Atlanta.”  The paper has further interesting results.

3. What is the chance you know someone with coronavirus?

4. Pareto: the virtual start-up assistant.  A new product and company.  The founder is EV winner Phoebe Yao.

5. Case numbers and deaths in prisons, relative to what the models predicted.

6. A simple John Cochrane model of Covid-19.  And further commentary along similar lines.  Both recommended.  Again, we are actually getting somewhere with these.

7. Houllebecq on Covid-19.  And “How Yukon’s ‘one caribou apart’ physical distancing campaign became a sensation.

Monday assorted links

Sunday assorted links

Saturday assorted links

Friday assorted links

Thursday assorted links

1. The Sahara was once the most dangerous place on earth, and why were there so many carnivorous relative to plant-eating dinosaurs and was that a paradox (Correct link here).

2. This guy documents product placement.

3. Good John Cochrane post about university finances and endowments in particular.

4. Words from Holman Jenkins (WSJ): “Please, if you are a jour­nal­ist re­port­ing on these mat­ters and can’t un­der­stand “flat­ten the curve” as a mul­ti­vari­ate propo­si­tion, leave the pro­fession. You are what econ­o­mists call a “neg­a­tive mar­ginal prod­uct” em­ployee. Your non­par­tic­i­pa­tion would add value. Your par­tic­i­pa­tion sub­tracts it.”

5. Large clusters with low R.

6. Netflix will make another season of Borgen.

7. Swedish public opinion.  And Swedes deter park visitors with horse manure.

8. What can we learn from other coronaviruses?

9. Why so many asymptomatic cases in prison?  And more heterogeneities: why are eastern European death rates so low?

10. How they do things in Iceland.

Wednesday assorted links and non-links

1. New York City parents care about the quality of the peers when choosing a school for their kids, not the effectiveness of the school per se.

2. Secular stagnation vs. technological lull?

3. Dan Klein on Covid and Coase.

4. “Investors are betting, in part, that the Covid-19 crisis accelerates the already growing power of America’s corporate colossuses.” (NYT)

5. NYT covers Sweden.  In my view we still don’t know how well the Swedish experiment is working out, but a continuing verdict of “we still don’t know” does in fact favor Sweden relative to priors.  And Thomas Friedman (NYT) on Sweden.  And update on some Swedish numbers.

6. A reader email on why child abuse is not opposed more passionately: “Basically, I think it comes down to the problem of agency vs structure. The left (including myself) wants to emphasize that problems have large structural components so we need to change the system. However individual heinous acts don’t fit neatly into that paradigm. Plus, child abuse is pervasive enough that it is sort of structural itself, and talking about it can sound like blaming a community or demographic, or hitting close to racism.  No idea why the right doesn’t emphasize it more other than the idea that it’s somehow “traditional”?”

7. Mel Baggs, disability advocate, RIP (NYT).  Formerly known as Amanda Baggs.

8. Quarantine stereotypes (video, funny, some of it).

9. Will colleges lose twenty percent of their student body this year?  Solve for the equilibrium.

10. Jason Furman: “If you had told me we would have a massive pandemic I would have predicted an increase in health spending. Shows why you shouldn’t listen to me. Health spending down 4.9% in Q1 (not annualized). Responsible for nearly 1/2 of the overall GDP decline. Likely down much more in Q2.”  Correctly or not, that makes me feel better about the observed gdp decline.  I am not minimizing the import of the non-Covid extra death toll (which is what exactly? Is it net even positive?), but I already felt bad about that.

Tuesday assorted links