What arbitrage would look like if destruction were the goal

by on December 29, 2008 at 6:59 am in Law | Permalink

High school students in Maryland are using speed cameras as a tool to
fine innocent drivers in a game, according to the Montgomery County
Sentinel newspaper. Because photo enforcement devices will
automatically mail out a ticket to any registered vehicle owner based
solely on a photograph of a license plate, any driver could receive a
ticket if someone else creates a duplicate of his license plate and
drives quickly past a speed camera. The private companies that mail out
the tickets often do not bother to verify whether vehicle registration
information for the accused vehicle matches the photographed vehicle.

Here is much more

1 Mike December 29, 2008 at 7:56 am

Why not give security to your fam for the holidays? Lots of good deals on AV out there. Just saw Panda Security for $20, good until new year’s day, apparently:

http://tinyurl.com/a3cyw6

2 Curt Fischer December 29, 2008 at 10:42 am

Never mind fraudulent license plates…to me the first problem with these set ups is what if it wasn’t you driving your car? Say you lent it to a friend, or your wife was driving alone. Maybe your nephew has it at college.

Are you liable for moving violations they commit with your car? I’m no lawyer but I had always assumed that in ordinary circumstances it was the vehicle driver, not the vehicle owner, who was responsible for ensuring safe operation.

3 Andrew December 29, 2008 at 11:16 am

“you just get a fine and don’t get “points” on your license”

This makes no sense to me. First of all, if no human actually looks , and it’s so easily rigged then a state punishment does not meet the usual criteria for conviction. (If a human basically does text recognition, then that’s a government inefficiency, not an investigation and barely evidence)

Second, if anything you should not get a ticket but SHOULD get your insurance company notified. They should decide whether you should be penalized for not securing your motor vehicle. Perhaps send it to all the insurance companies.

4 Nate December 29, 2008 at 11:22 am

The rule usually is that you can’t send a ticket without a good picture of the driver. At least in most jurisdictions I’m aware of. Sometimes with hilarious results:
http://boingboing.net/2008/10/27/german-traffic-cops.html

5 Klug December 29, 2008 at 11:42 am

As much as I hate these red light cameras, I have to admit that most setups are the two-camera license-and-driver-types. My understanding is similar to Nate, where you need clear identification of the driver. Apparently, things work differently in Maryland.

My fantasy solution to these things is a .30-06, but I’m afraid that’s against the law.

6 SA December 29, 2008 at 2:21 pm

I think it is against the Law to use fake license plates and hence the correct solution should be to photograph the individual who is driving the car. Use that information to track down who committed the crime and punish them… Flunking the students for a semester for the first offense seems reasonable.. Multiple offenses should be dealt with heavy fines and imprisonment as well… just my personal opinion… Students should learn to be disciplined.

7 iolanthe December 29, 2008 at 6:52 pm

Here in the antipodes the owner of the car is presumed to be the driver but liability (which includes a point reduction on the licence as well as a fine) can be transferred via a statutory declaration identifying the other driver. what I’m not clear about is what happens when you don’t know who the other driver is – I put this to a policeman once and his not terribly helpful comment was that you are expected to know who is driving your car.

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