Markets in everything, if this works it will change the world edition

by on March 10, 2009 at 7:13 am in Economics | Permalink

Cut a deal with anyone, using a website to record the terms and conduct the negotiations.

For instance perhaps (ha) you can convince your wife to turn down the thermostat in the house in return for taking out the recycling bin every Monday.  Or, more promisingly, maybe I can promise to Bryan Caplan that I won't make fun of his naive realism in return for his eating Pho with us twice a year.  This site gives you a handy written record of the agreement.

Further below you read about training: "Make a sample deal with our interns."

The motto of this very ambitious site is: "Asynchronous Negotiation Favors the Underdog"

Zamfir March 10, 2009 at 8:39 am

Huh? Why not write it down yourself?

Timothy March 10, 2009 at 9:29 am

If the website could monitor, and enforce, all such agreements it would change the world. It is difficult to imagine how that might be achieved, however.

Brock March 10, 2009 at 9:57 am

As a contract attorney I find this site amusing. I’ll keep an eye on it though. Ultimately though the single most limiting factor on deal negotiations is each side’s willingness to actually read and understand the terms of the contract that don’t interest them, and I don’t see how this website would ever change that.

Andrew March 10, 2009 at 11:22 am

Hmmm, I wonder how many contracts are actually ‘enforced’ in general.

Anonymous March 10, 2009 at 12:04 pm

Their motto sounds cool but does it make sense?

Somebody should build this type of service on top of Twitter. Each person gets 140 characters to articulate their demands.

Christian March 10, 2009 at 6:22 pm

put the contract on Facebook…then everyone (friends, co-workers, etc.) can ‘enforce’

Andrew March 11, 2009 at 6:20 am

I guess the question is, do you doubt your senses just because you know they are biased? That seems like the wrong road, not just from a scientific hand-waving perspective. Even if senses were perfect, the world is a bell curve of possibilities, so it would seem that introducing an additional error term on top of uncertainty compounds the error. It would seem better to assume the actual sensory input is the mean because that is what you can be surest of, but don’t bet too heavily on your conclusions, unless you are absolutely sure.

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: