Assorted links

by on September 8, 2009 at 1:07 pm in Education | Permalink

1. Ben Casnocha chats with Penelope Trunk.

2. Buy and sell words on Twitter (but not with real money).

3. America’s food revolution.

4. Many world records were set in Mexico this year.

5. Where we’re headed.

6. Markets in everything: the office kid.

7. Bruce Bartlett joins Capital Gains and Games.

Peter September 8, 2009 at 1:13 pm

The “office kid” link is dead.

Ed September 8, 2009 at 1:29 pm

Trunk, or whatever her name is these days is obnoxious and narcissistic…. Why would I want to be associated with her or her linked-in clone?

Andrew September 8, 2009 at 3:11 pm

1. Ms. Trunk is fine, but careerism is the personal version of fiat currency. Expertise on the other hand is slower, less flashy, and real, like gold.

Andrew Edwards September 8, 2009 at 3:43 pm

Or is it because it is “purveyed” by chains that it is “bad food”?

How reliably does the use of the word “purveyed” indicate snobbishness?

It’s not like I use it a lot in daily conversation….

Mike S September 8, 2009 at 4:56 pm

You would think that this fact:

“The employment report shows that private sector employment in August 2009 was lower than it was in August 1999″

would be worthy of more than poorly named link in a daily linkfest.

Why in the hell is private employment lower 10 years than it was 10 years later? Thats a pretty damn big issue, recession or no recession.

k September 8, 2009 at 5:32 pm

Government pork in everything : SFW but for the heading: http://www.thelocal.se/21870/20090903/

Andrew September 9, 2009 at 6:06 am

“The employment report shows that private sector employment in August 2009 was lower than it was in August 1999″

Mike S, it’s kind of like saying stocks are lower now than 10 years ago. It’s a problem, but I don’t think any useful conclusions can be drawn directly from those facts alone.

Part of the problem and more important is that federal government payrolls are now double private sector. But, even that needs detailing. Adjusted for education? State and local gov’t? Including part-time work? etc. However, it is indicative of a problem that federal payrolls went from 166% in 2000 to 200% today. People get dumped into Medicare for the big dollar days. I’m not sure that health insurance is the big tax on employment. Maybe taxes are.

Mike S September 9, 2009 at 6:52 pm

“Mike S, it’s kind of like saying stocks are lower now than 10 years ago. It’s a problem, but I don’t think any useful conclusions can be drawn directly from those facts alone.”

Sorry this is just poor analysis. If the private sector hasn’t created any net jobs for a decade, it is a huge problem for workers and our economy. We should examine why this is the case despite the lowest tax burden in a generation.

At the depths of the early 80′s recession, we had 17% more private sector jobs than a decade prior. These numbers are not population adjusted, so we are talking about raw jobs. Because we have a working age population that has grown by 150,000 a month, we now have around 18,000,000 more people competing for the same number of jobs.

I do not know how you can compare this to the stock market. In the stock market, we have not discovered any absolute valuation metric that decides value.

Let me assure you the FAJ would find your thesis unpublishable.

five fingers September 22, 2010 at 1:30 pm

I gree with it!

バックリンク November 17, 2010 at 9:50 am

I don’t think “undemocratic” means what you think it means

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