Sentences to ponder…

by on December 11, 2013 at 2:24 pm in Economics, Games, Philosophy | Permalink

Notably, easy-to-reach women are happier than easy-to-reach men, but hard-to-reach men are happier than hard-to-reach women, and conclusions of a survey could reverse with more attempted calls.

That is Ori Heffetz and Matthew Rabin, in the new AER.  An ungated version is here.  Understandably, the authors are worried about potential subject selection biases in studies of self-reported happiness.

mike December 11, 2013 at 2:51 pm

Ahem… effect size…

Axa December 12, 2013 at 2:59 am

Or self reported happiness. Happiness is just a tool for self-promotion. You say you are happy because it´s easier to meet people this way, not because you are actually feeling it. Perhaps what is revealed here is that society expects women to be happy as an attribute. So women, more than men, need to show happiness to socialize and get ahead in life.

orinrpx777 December 12, 2013 at 5:04 pm

My Uncle Julian got a new green GMC Canyon only from working parttime online. have a peek at this website……… Tec202. COM

Steve Sailer December 11, 2013 at 4:01 pm

It’s almost as if stereotypes of women as liking to talk and socialize more than men might be … true.

Doug December 11, 2013 at 4:09 pm

But if you are easy to reach doesn’t that mean you aren’t already talking or socializing with someone else? If I was looking for steroetypes to confirm, they would be that men are happier when they are busy, and women are happier when they are idle. Then again I love being idle, but I’m just a sample of one…

Slocum December 11, 2013 at 4:06 pm

My guess is that ‘easy to reach’ tends to mean not working. A greater fraction of non-working women than men are out of the labor force by choice (and happy about it). On the other end of the spectrum, ‘hard to reach’ tends to mean working long hours. More men than women are happy about it.

AC December 11, 2013 at 8:48 pm

How did this make the AER?

Dismalist December 11, 2013 at 10:29 pm

My wife is hard to reach ’cause she has a life. I am hard to reach ’cause I don’t wish to be reached. We are very roughly equally content ["Happy" is a big word.] So what?

Norman Pfyster December 12, 2013 at 10:04 am

The hard-to-reach people were unavailable for comment.

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