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So what's your list Tyler? And could you please avoid some bizarre foreign science fiction novels?

I am not familar with Falkenstein but this is a solid article with accurate descriptions of trading strategies. I particularly liked his characterization of the effect of computers and competition on the market.

"The short-term speculator basically makes less because the algorithm reverse engineers his insight. This is the essence of an informationally efficient market, where news gets into the price asap. That those at the bleeding edge are making a profit is not a bug, it's a feature."

There will always be those who try to manipulate markets. The best hope for the retail trader is accessible technology, lots of participants and no government regulation (which will always favor a small number of politically influencial). This is the truth in the "Wisdom of Crowds."

I want to recommend the following book, which is about to be reprinted:

Mechanization Takes Command
A Contribution to Anonymous History
Written by Sigfried GiedionAuthor Alerts: Random House will alert you to new works by Sigfried Giedion
Introduction by Witold RybczynskiAuthor

* Category: Science - History; Science - Mechanics
* Format: Trade Paperback, 768 pages
* On Sale: February 9, 2010
* Price: $27.95
* ISBN: 978-1-59017-337-4 (1-59017-337-6)

(Available February 9, 2010)

"ABOUT THIS BOOK

Over the last two hundred years mechanization has moved from being a marginal marvel, of interest to scientists and tinkerers, to the dominant condition of modern society and economy, so much so that it is now easy to imagine a future where mechanization even enters into the human mind and body. Sigfried Giedion’s extraordinary, encyclopedic book traces the various ways in which, for better and for worse, mechanization has assumed control of our lives, from modern systems of hygiene and waste management, to agricultural production, fashion, and beyond.

Giedion’s book is not only clearly written but also eloquent and thoughtful in its investigation of mechanization’s reach and appeal, and it offers fascinating insights into the intersection between mechanization and the imagination, as manifested in literature and the visual arts. With a wealth of unusual and intriguing illustrations taken from old sales catalogues, industrial manuals, magazines, and other sources, Giedion’s book constitutes a remarkable and endlessly suggestive history of modernity itself, as comprehensive as it is provocative and eccentric."

I found that it had a lot of information about economic history as well.

OK, the one thing on that surprising fact list that truly shocked me: Dan Brown went to Amherst?! I think Antony Lane put it best in his review of the Da Vinci Code movie:

"Brown proves that he hails from the school of elbow-joggers—nervy, worrisome authors who can’t stop shoving us along with jabs of information and opinion that we don’t yet require. Buried far below this tic is an author’s fear that his command of basic, unadorned English will not do the job; in the case of Brown, he’s right."

Interesting article by Falkenstein. He is right. The traders cannot rip you off if you are not in the game. Minimize your trading and the traders can only take you for a few pennies. And so what. I do worry about our best minds wasting their intellectual capacity on such a low value add activity. Better that they be working for a business devising better processes, materials, things in general.

thanks very very nice

tºkler Adminn

Brown proves that he hails from the school of elbow-joggers—nervy, worrisome authors who can’t stop shoving us along with jabs of information and opinion that we don’t yet require. Buried far below this tic is an author’s fear that his command of basic, unadorned English will not do the job; in the case of Brown, he’s right

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