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The last Terry Prachett book was $9.99 as an e-book, and $8.49 in hardcover. I chose to buy the e-book -- faster delivery, no storage space required.

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I just bought an iPad. I reckon that by the time I've read all the freely available books the old publishers will either have gone bust or realized the folly of treating their customers with contempt by ripping them off as much as possible. Either outcome is fine by me, but I'm not a shareholder of any publishing company.

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#5 - A socialist idea if I ever saw one.

A land tax is simply a wealth tax on one portion of one's wealth. Why not go all the way and tax all assets?

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I am pretty sure those books are ones that gain from visibility. The publisher is willing to pay you to take the hardcover because that helps to drive sales. If you see someone reading a Kindle, unless you ask, you have no idea what they are reading.

Perfect sense for throw-away novels. They got to pump the public's attention. It's now or never.

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A land tax is simply a wealth tax on one portion of one's wealth. Why not go all the way and tax all assets?

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The issue is the distortionary effect of the tax.

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Tomasz:

In some cases, Steam games actually have more transferability. You can log into Steam from any computer and access your games (and in some cases, your saves and configuration), without having to bring your DVDs with you.

Steam also sometimes puts games on dramatic sale, too. The price moves around a lot, even more than Amazon, and in a lot of cases it's actually easier to obtain out-of-print games than finding them retail.

There are also cases I've seen where a physical CD is cheaper than buying all the songs (even with whole album discount) from iTunes, Amazon MP3, etc.

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