For a while, in Blogland, Alex was married to Natasha

He also was buying Haitian art and describing his favorite things Alabama.  How so?  During the transition to WordPress many of my posts were attributed to him.  One of our assistants explains:

The root of the problem was the sheer number of comments you have.  After running the importer a few times, we actually hit a computational limit in PHP on 32-bit systems, which caused the errors we’ve seen.  After manually manipulating the data, however, we’ve sorted everything out and we won’t be running into this problem again.

The RSS feed has been flushed and is displaying in proper order once again.  For some readers, this may take a few more hours to update.  For others, depending on how their reader grabs and stores posts, the wonky posts may just have to cycle out.

Sorry again for the technical problems involved with this.  I’ve never had problems relating to sheer data size, but I’ve never dealt with something with close to 150,000 unique data points be entered multiple times. ..Pushing the upper bounds of programming languages through sheer blogging volume is pretty admirable.

We are continuing to work out the glitches, thanks for your patience!

Comments

So it was ourfault??

No, it was the fault of a lousy programming methodology. 32 bits is 4billion. 150,000 is way, WAY in the dirt unless you're playing some (really stupid) O(N^2) game.

Yes, that lousy programming methodology is the WordPress importer for TypePad. As much as I love WordPress for everything else, they have yet to master the art of importing from TypePad. Or perhaps it's more accurately stated that TypePad has yet to master exporting its data in a form that's at all manageable. So, Peter Snyder, a programming genius, created a data parser from scratch to deal with MR's sheer volume of economic blogging awesomeness.

And yes, I realize that 2 to the 32nd power is way bigger than 150,000. That's just how awful that export/import process is--it makes orders of magnitude more entries than necessary.

Wow! You guys are libertarians.

*scoff* PHP is a computational limit all by itself.

So did they tell you when your blog roll going to show up in the margins again?

Alex would never buy Haitian art. He'd take a hi-res photo of yours.

"Pushing the upper bounds" of PHP is like "pushing the upper bounds" of a Volkswagon Beetle. It gets you from point A to point B, but you're not exactly shocked when you outstrip its capabilities.

Tyler is trying to signal his greatness because he has so many comments.

Instead, at least to me, he ends up signaling that he is someone who is dependent on developers using PHP (which is about as dated as the 'goto' statement in programming languages). No surprise he would write a book titled The Great Stagnation.

People still use 32 bit systems to do useful tasks?

The WTF moment comes from that, not from PHP.

MR will soon be moved to a 64-bit server. Look forward to marginal speed gains.

"using PHP (which is about as dated as the ‘goto’ statement in programming languages)"
Every free CMS is written in PHP. There has been bit inflation 32bits these days aren't what they used to be. You can quite easily run out of 32bit counters.

"it was the fault of a lousy programming methodology. 32 bits is 4billion. 150,000 is way"
They hit a computational limit(or whatever such vague term means), they didn't run out of record ids.

No, it really was record IDs, that's how backwards the process between TypePad and WordPress works. Anyway, I love WordPress and its awesomeness is proven by the market. It's the world's number one CMS system. Also, PHP is great, especially when adequate caching is in place to save on server overhead. Sure, it'd probably make for a faster site to custom code all blogs in Ruby, but there are other costs involved in web development.

The new header image has a lot of JPEG compression artifacts which makes it look awful. You ought to replace it with a PNG. By the way, otherwise I like the visual refresh.

Header image? I see a green bar.

I agree that PHP has the most convenient ecosystem for CMS's and blogging platforms, since it's easily the most popular server side scripting language on the web. However, choosing to migrate a blog as large as this one to a 32-bit PHP system seems like an invitation for trouble. There's no reason to use the inferior technology if you're already going to be paying switching costs. A little bit more effort up front could have led to a much more maintainable deployment using Django or RoR. On a 64-bit server.

In a few years ago, but Mr Friedman said, America's "capital market execution function of the industrial policy. So, look now, again turn head to see when friedman's speech, that year to implement industrial policy functions,

importer a few times, we actually hit a computational limit in PHP on 32-bit systems, which caused the errors we’ve seen. After manually manipulating the data, however, we’ve sorted everything out and we won’t be running into this problem

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