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#1 - Many years ago, I was married to a middle school band director. Because she taught at an impoverished school, I was the unofficial band instrument repairman. Having seen the inside of many a spittle and grime encrusted musical instrument, I would say "No".

Stanley Kubrick invents iPad in 1968
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_O_dOMG3oo

Michael Okuda invents iPad in 1992
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVqHoGKQXLI

Xerox Parc actually invents iPad (also in 1992)
http://blogs-images.forbes.com/ericsavitz/files/2011/07/054fdg75Qq6TU_8069.jpg

The ideas for these things exist well before they are created. Steve Jobs brought signalling theory and supply chains together to allow for the creation of a non-clunky device at a keeping-up-with-the-Jones's price point that led to its widespread adoption (in actual possession or just in desire).

I think if it had been patented by Fidler, we wouldn't have the iPad today. Sort of like how Qualcomm patents hold back wireless.

"I think if it had been patented by Fidler, we wouldn’t have the iPad today. Sort of like how Qualcomm patents hold back wireless."
Bingo!

Wait, just the idea for a computer that is small enough but no smaller, that's patentable? Is that what is in question?

No and no

Go Corp. builds a tablet computer in 1987: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GO_Corp.

2. Reminds me of an idea that's been floating around, a critique of economics and the causality of supply and demand.

Re: 3
The only reason people are looking for money substitutes is because money is not deflating enough. Money deflating at the rate of productivity growth would take care of most of that.

Still no MR articles on the Koch/Cato lawsuit. Gee, I wonder if Tyler and Alex got official warnings to keep their mouths shut on the subject, or if they're just playing the CYA game.

What they really need to do is produce an opinion for the convenience of Mike Huben.

There is nothing really to be said about it that can't be learned from the same thing that happens every day at churches, councils and firms where power is struggled over.

All you want is to increase the damage from the tabloid aspects. So, no thanks.

I would be interested in a detailed piece from Tyler on power struggles like this that happen a hundred times a day throughout the world. One thing is the managers build something then principals want to shift the organizations focus or time horizon. That is hinted at here: http://thinkmarkets.wordpress.com/2012/03/08/the-battle-for-cato/ and probably hundreds of other sources from people who are actually, you know first-hand knowledgeable, so what exactly do you need MR to produce on this that is anything but your bad faith? Since you don't even get that it's just another generic power struggle you have nothing to offer of value to me.

Re: #2. I think we tend too heap too much credit for things on single heroes because it fits a nice narrative. Even in a field like economics, we tend to remember only a few names of the jokers who wrote some stuff down, when much of the good stuff was common wisdom to folks like my grandparents. They never thought about writing it down because they never thought it was all that remarkable.

1. What is the rent?

Is it too damn high?

4. Safe assets as money.

KO bonds?

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