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'I predict it will do less well than Bitcoin'

But than the euro, right?

And how is eurogeddon looking these days?

or 'But better than the euro, right?'

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5. You are being sarcastic, right?

I thought it was one of Brooks' better efforts. I also suspect engaged vs. detached has a lot to do with personality-type, not so much political ideology.

I like Brooks, except I get the feeling that if we were walking down the street and a half-a-dozen hoodlums jumped and started stomping me to death he'd sit back and say "I'd like to hear their side of things."

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I'm a new blogger, mostly detached (and I agree that's down to personality as much as politics), and I've wondered about where my work fits, if anywhere, based on exactly what Brooks is talking about. I thought it was a good article.

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I liked it. (self-indentify: independent, retained registration: Republican)

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#1 has proven itself durable, with notes issued since at least the late 1800's: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell_money

I predict the Bank of Hell will outlast Bitcoin :-D

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Re: #3: George Carlin comes to mind: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of them are even stupider."

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Very absorbing interview with Knausgaard.

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#3 Today, there are still many people that would like to see Obamacare repealed or, at the very least, are critical about its implementation so far. Presumably, all of these people are among the 60% that know that Obamacare is law. On the other hand, we have not heard many, if any, people call for the re-instatement of Obamacare or for the passing of new legislation that is substantially similar to Obamacare, implying that the 40% of Americans that are unaware that Obamacare is law would be happy, or at least satisfied, if Obamacare were not in fact law.

So, 40% of Americans are happy but mistaken that Obamacare isn't law, while a substantial portion of the remaining 60% wish that Obamacare wasn't law.

Given it affects only about 20% of the people, are you arguing the well insured do not want the uninsured to stop waiting for care at the ER?

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'42% of Americans unsure if ObamaCare is still law.'

Wow - I did not think so many people read Volokh's group blog.

The Origination Clause challenge has legs, dammit!

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That was a great little dig at Krugman and his ilk.

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What about comparing Bush's art to Ike's paintings.

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The paper on Gypsy law and superstition was interesting. I don't see why such a set of superstitions would have arisen by any natural process, but I can see why such a set of superstitions have helped keep the Gypsies as a recognizable separate group from their surrounding populations through centuries of living next to one another.

I wonder how many different outsider groups there were in Europe, as different from the surrounding population as Gypsies or Jews, who simply disappeared into the surrounding population. For example, if you can easily adopt the local religion and language and intermarry with the locals, pretty soon, your group will probably be really hard to distinguish from anyone else--the way Americans with Irish or Italian or German ancestry are today. Presumably, the groups that maintained a separate identity had beliefs or practices or *something* that kept them separate.

#2
You have been told these other groups 'disappeared'. You have been misinformed:

Investigation of the fine structure of European populations with applications to disease association studies. http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v16/n12/abs/ejhg2008210a.html

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Isn't "gypsy" an ethnic slur along the same lines as n**ger? I believe the PC term is something like romy or romani.

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Re #5 It's somewhat puzzling why media companies need to even pay the propagandists, or "engaged" writers as Brooks calls them. One might think that the offer of essentially free ad space would be enough to attract many submissions from writers eager to help their "team". After all, we know that political campaigns pay for ad time on TV and radio and, presumably, would pay for print ad space too if they believed they could reach enough readers. The value in the pieces written by "engaged" writers falls to the writers, not the readers. By the same token, it is also puzzling that some readers want to pay to read pieces written by "engaged" writers: it's kind of like skipping through the programming to see the commercials. Maybe, many readers don't want to pay and one of the reasons that it's so hard to get people to pay for media nowadays is because more and more of it is written by "engaged" writers.

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I mostly agree with you, but I think the point is that a) "engaged" readers enjoy reading quality propaganda and are even willing to pay for it b) "engaged" writers are not necessarily engaged when it comes to tactics and thus may have something interesting to say about tactical issues.

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3. 42% of Americans unsure if ObamaCare is still law.

It is sort of a stealth law set to be enacted after Obama was term limited out of needing to run again.

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#5 http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2013/04/david-brooks-and-the-role-of-opinion-journalism.html

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Assorted links

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