Markets in everything those new service sector jobs

Advansun, 39, is a full-time “sleep writer” in Toronto. He writes with one goal in mind — to lull people off to la-la land.

Advansun publishes his bedtime stories for adults on the popular app Calm.com, where they are voiced by famous actors like Matthew McConaughey.

Calm.com says its roster of 120 sleep stories has been listened to more than 100 million times.

“I think we are putting a modern take to something that’s pretty timeless,” he says. “We are giving grownups permission to drift off to sleep to a story, and that’s not something a lot of people have thought about before.”

Advansun says the key is to get the attention of the listener and then “hold it gently” without ever jostling them awake. He maintains this is a tough balance to achieve … especially since Advansun is trained as a screenwriter (think plot twists, car chases and explosions).

“I certainly didn’t set out to write stories that put people to sleep,” he jokes. “I have sort of fallen into it, and I adore it. It’s not only quite rewarding, it is a great challenge as a writer.”

Here is the full story, via Michelle Dawson.

Comments

And for the surrealism or nightmare desiring crowd, there is Joe Frank - 'Joe Frank began his career in 1976 at WBAI, in New York City. In his Saturday night show, “In the Dark,” he experimented with live freeform radio featuring his monologues and actor improvisations. It was during this period that Joe’s bizarre and original vision quickly drew increasingly larger audiences.' https://www.joefrank.com/

So that is what Americans have become: children who must be told stories to sleep. Meanwhile, America's economy is hollowed out by Red China.

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz....

Hey, it works!

So this is how liberty dies...with thunderous snores!

Thread Winner!

Maybe text-to-voice with some of the commenters here. I have two specifically in mind.

There are plenty of economics books that will put one to sleep.

Plus all those papers about the crying need for more gender-diversity at economics departments

In the same vein you could look at ASMR artists on YouTube and elsewhere - people who quietly whisper and tap on objects, sometimes doing specific tasks, sometimes role playing characters, to relax their audience. De gustibus non est disputandum.

I'll have to try this one. The Sleep With Me podcast works for me. It seems that the trick is to keep your attention just barely enough to distract you from those annoying thoughts in your head, but not so much that you fight sleep to know what happens next.
https://www.sleepwithmepodcast.com/

This reminds me of a comment I read years ago on UseNet. Look for things that are done/occur in daily life. Then see if anyone is doing something with it online. If no one is that is an opportunity for you in the virtual world.

I checked; mine seemed to be well taken already

I nominate Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward as having the most soporific prose yet published in the US. (I don't know that I ever finished it, but the reading was assigned for a negligible undergrad course of sociology.)

If I recall correctly, Bellamy's horrid prose put me to sleep on at least two successive nights, so provoking was the text.

This is no criticism as I love the book, but Leonard Mlodinow's The Drunkard's Walk on audible.com was a great way to put me to sleep.

Another crappy job with no benefits. How many of these "service sector jobs" post have we had already? How many of them will create a healthy middle class?

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