twocharts

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capitalist meritocracy replaces ethnicity/title/caste as the lever of hierarchy

is this better?

Yes: it’s MORE egalitarian & dynamic

No: it’s LESS communitarian

A benign political economist: an economist w a sociological coefficient for sense-of-belonging

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I'm I the only one non plussed by this? What happened to th 90s, oughts and teens?

It’s by birth age and the data starts at age 25.... the reason for their exclusion should be obvious

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Cohort sizes are changing so difficult to know significance of this.

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It shows that university degrees are more and more about signaling and less about learning.

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Coming Apart. By Charles Murray.

This chart = the book

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I would like to see the suicide data broken out.

More educated people may be less likely to abuse drugs and alcohol. I wonder about depression ...

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Lack of meaningful work is a major element in depression. When the 1960 cohort was leaving high school, it was readily apparent that the non-college job market was saturated by all those 1955 cohort put out of a job due to free trade.

No worries, free trade initially benefits the high earning/college grads in wealthy countries and the poor in poor countries. It's been 40 years, surely the middle income in wealthy countries will see things turn around. Well, maybe for their grandkids, if they haven't killed themselves dulling the pain over the last 40 years.

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Great data. Terrible visual design. I kind of want to redo the graph.

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Consider also sample change with the increase in tertiary-educated population over the 20th century.

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Here's something that connects those dots.

In a discussion about his book “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality“, Justin Gest described the pain and downward spiral of damage caused by job loss when many steel mills closed in Youngstown, Ohio. He stated that the city lost 50,000 jobs in five years. During that time, suicide and divorce rates skyrocketed, and the city became the murder capital of the US by the late 1980s. The city population dropped from 170,000 to about 65,000. As a result, many people felt they were marginalized and that they no longer had a voice in public policy, business interests and government (Gest, 2016)."

Our attention should be on writing a better ending to this story.

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More linkage. Low-income families disproportionately lack health insurance, a system historically tied to employment. The National Bureau of Economic Research studied the linkage between a lack of health insurance and the death rate. The US could have averted about 15,600 deaths between 2008 and 2013 had every state expanded Medicaid. And that is only among 55-64-year-olds.
https://www.nber.org/papers/w26081

We're talking life and death here.

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And then there is this:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/03/opinion/sunday/workers-conservatives.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article

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