Saturday assorted links

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Immigrants can create billions out of painting toe nails and frying doughnuts. American borns whine when opportunity is everywhere but they don't bother to look. No wonder Trump is President. A whiny President for whiners.

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#1 I can't remember what they're called but in Bali, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand traditional dancers have these long pieces of finger jewelry. It's hardly surprising they'd latch on to an affinity for long white-woman nails with dazzling colors.

#2 If you believe in the myth of the Garden of Eden as a parable of how humans came to know the world of pain, then you'd say no because there was a time when humans were not defined by pain. However, you must then ask if Adam and Eve were indeed human when they inhabited the garden, or if they only became so after they sinned. If they only became human after the fall then yes, the human condition is defined by suffering.

Also, a world without pain does not exist, and attempting to cheat has proven again and again to lead to more pain.

#6 But does it?

The story about the woman without pain was fascinating. It sounded like she feels the sensations, just doesn't register them as pain--maybe that's why she didn't end up killing herself by mistake as a small child, the way many people lacking pain or sensation do.

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#6. In terms of fake evidence supporting fake news:

will the marketing success of this venture be measured in the number of requests for "verification", in the number of units sold, or in the number of cases in which these items are "misapplied" (dare we assume that they come wrapped in a warning label reading "NOT FOR INTERNAL USE"?)

What happens if the items are lit? (I guess they get hot, but what happens to the scent?)

Probably beats long-lasting chewing gum: the flavor might enjoy no staying power or folks could get bored with it after fifteen or twenty minutes.

Ear-wax lollipops next? Toe-jam air freshener?

(Dead Romans must positively pine in their graves for reconstitution in order to join our enlightened, sophisticated, and glorious days.)

I want a pinot-noir with the bouquet of Slash's top hat.

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Seen elsewhere: "This isn't the 21st century I was hoping for."

Where the Hell are the flying cars?

Glad you asked: this I do believe and think is the closest we can get:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGwVZIWEUoE

Autogiros are widely unknown considering they've been around (not only in concept) for almost ninety years. Two-seaters available with tandem or side-by-side configurations. Typical range about 100 miles, speeds comfortably in excess of 60 mph. (New mast stabilizers are said to improve comfort.) Needs only a short runway for takeoffs and landings. ULTRA-COOL for millennial tastes.

I've never flown in one but would trust an autogiro before I'd let any industrial-sized drone lift me off the ground.

I do not understand why police and newsrooms the world over do not trade in all their traffic monitoring helicopters for small fleets of autogiros--much less expensive, much less expensive to operate and maintain.

More recent promo video of gyrocopters/gyroplanes circumnavigating Iceland:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmwEbjzLtDo

This shows their range well: can taxi onto a ferry, can navigate on highways, pull up to conventional filling stations.

You need computers flying the things before they can become mass-market--most people are barely up to driving in *two* dimensions.

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At CES, a flying car. Uber is involved, says 2023 for deployment. Looks like a giant drone.

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6. Whoa! I once knew a lawyer who was related to her. He gave up his law practice to become her full-time lawyer. I thought the man crazy. Little did I know then that the world had gone mad. An aside, when I was a boy I had a friend, Harrison, who planned to get rich by selling, well, it would come in a bottle or can, I can't remember which. That was adolescent obsession with something we knew nothing about. At least I thought so at the time, but Harrison knew something I didn't know and is likely a billionaire now. Markets in everything.

Pepper Potts pushes pussy perfume producing pouting by peevish people. Pope predicts purloining by prudish priest pulling off peculiar publishing performance.

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In my case, “not recommended” makes me much more likely to click on an assorted link here. I’ve yet to regret it.

Years ago someone on another blog posted a link to a video, with a warning not to watch it. It was something extremely disgusting involving poop, and I did regret that one.

Two girls one cup? That's quaint. You have yet to experience the full range of horror and filth that the Internet has to offer.

That’s the one.

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Re: #2 - Will 2020 finally bring peak Trump Agony?

There will be the wailing and gnashing of teeth.

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#6 https://image.businessinsider.com/5dea8909695b58065b6e6dcd?width=1300&format=jpeg&auto=webp

"You can make your entire home smell like fried chicken with KFC's scented fireplace logs"

"The log is made from 100% recycled wax cardboard (not fried chicken), and it's not edible."

Both involve wax and both are not edible ...

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Outline is very unreliable. It doesn't work half of the time. Please don't use it or paste Outline links.

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5. "In June 2016, Ohio police found the decomposing body of ginseng digger Bobby Joe Grubbs, 31, in Joseph Kutter’s mulch pile. Kutter, 79, who claimed Grubbs was trespassing with the intent to steal ginseng, was charged with killing him with an AK-47 rifle and sentenced to three years in prison for voluntary manslaughter. "

3 years? That's it? Boomers can murder Millenials with impunity it seems. Boomers are the thug generation.

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The pain story, though in typical New Yorker science-ese, was more interesting than I thought it would be. I was thinking of the same writer's very sad "Thanksgiving in Mongolia," one of the better things written by a woman this millennium. It combines in one event a truly harrowing experience, a realization prompted by that event - at least, about as far as she could allow herself to acknowledge, and the New Yorker to let such a radical thought see print - that her faulty judgment had undermined her entire life, and presumably - what I myself can attest is like jumping off Reichenbach Falls - a massive hormone drop; the latter of which, if the Scottish woman is really impervious to it, would truly make her the bionic woman.

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