Saturday assorted links

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#2 Or in other words, the millies, armed with participation trophies, believe themselves the entitled rulers of the world.

As a millennial, I can happily tell you that the Millenial and Gen Z generations don’t really want to go through with the hard work of attaining power......

Even someone like AOC, if elected president, would find their administration run by gen X’ers and Boomers....

It’s easier to bitch, moan, tweet, occupy a space, protest and shout down but to actually assume the mantles of power? Ya right.....

The milles will be playing video games. Their boomer parents generation will keep the power on for them. Once the boomers are gone, the milles will all be b*tches for China. China has a woman shortage, so maybe the soy boys will do.

There seems to be some contingent out there with enough drive to set police stations on fire. That's more than I can say for my generation.

Yeah and attack old ladies and rape women too. I'm sure you approve of that as well.

Who dies? The point was that these guys are to sanguine. There could be a genuine Lenin among these psychos.

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Good column, bad analysis. There's no mention of generational conflict and no reason to try to spin it that way. It just highlights your own insecurities.

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I think the portion of the population that are really turned on by hard intellectual inquiry is more or less constant. We're just sending more people to college.

+1
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=h2TrRWAkbr8

That’s Peter Thiel at Harvard in a talk with Cornel West.

Watch the Q and A segment, you would think you were at a community college or vocational school when the students start asking questions.

Once again, all of this “nonsense” is caused by grade inflation. You can woke, intersectional, feminize, go socialist, whatever. That actually doesn’t matter so much.There have always been left wing philosophy-economics types of the highest academic caliber.

It is the grade inflation that is allowing lesser tier students to endure at these prestigious universities.

“This micro aggression will not stand” is the official rallying cry of someone who is way over their heads academically speaking.

Thiel and West were trying to have a serious talk and the “students of Harvard” start coming with the Mumbo jumbo BS.

The look on Thiel’s face during the questioning is priceless...

Harvard is a finishing school for the elite. Only a tiny subset of Harvard graduates come from and rise out of the underclass.

Tax that endowment!

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Years ago, there was a post on this blog in which either Alex or Tyler ventured a guess that - among economists - about 10 percent of the economists, when writing an economics paper, did so with enthusiasm and intellectual interest.

I would be embarrassed to tell you how much I know about the intellectual development of George Will, his highs and lows over the years, and the compromises (intellectual compromises) that he has publicly made. But trust me, I know a lot about that (a semi-eidetic memory is not the blessing one might think, if you are someone who, like unto the ancient philosopher, can say "nihil puto Americanorum gentium mihi alienum esse".)

Jesus said the poor will always be with us (in this world) , and it is true that we will always share this old earth with selfish people with strong opinions and an inability or lack of desire to reflect on the truth: they too are poor, and deserve our pity, not our disdain.

>and deserve our pity, not our disdain.

With all due respect, you can stick this very, very far up your ass.

Public figures issuing public comments on public policy, who are lying with every breath they exhale? (IE, every single employee of the NYT, or NPR, or George Will).

They deserve every ounce of disdain and mockery that each human on Earth can summon. You want to pity them, too? Do it on your own time.

Well, I was created by God as an eternal creature (I remember), so I have lots of time.

Thanks for the due respect part, though ....

seriously, though , every generation needs to deal with the overwhelming slag heap of stupidity among our fellow human creatures that afflicts so so many many of us, in so many negative ways.

Insulting me might make you feel better but it does not advance the cause of truth, does it?

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For a concrete example, look at what the leader of Singapore did when faced with the reality of omnipresent ignorance. You know, there are a lot of smart people in the world, and not many of us have spent much time pondering ignorance. I have, and so did that guy in Singapore.

Closer to home, try and remember what those of us who supported the ideas of art did in the last century, when modernism and brutalism threatened to strangle so many opportunities for beauty.

If I were in a good mood, I would tell you where you could find immense beauties - recent traditional architecture, conversation from the 60s onwards, poetry, not necessarily in that order - that might not have existed if not for people like me, but I am not in a good mood. Well, I am , but not to the extent necessary to bother fully explaining myself to you.

Next time you try and communicate with me, be polite. If you find it difficult, reread Proverbs 8 a few times before indulging yourself in your sad little invectives.

This was an epic “Get off my lawn!”

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https://www.nas.org/blogs/article/a_crisis_of_competence_the_corrupting_effect_of_political_activism_in_the_u

Great article. Thanks for linking it.

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Did you read this from our current leader in thinking?

Beyond the Face of Race: Emo-Cognitive Explorations of White Neurosis and Racial Cray-Cray

"Interaction with White people is at times so overwhelming, draining, and incomprehensible that it causes serious anguish for People of Color. Take for example when a White colleague abruptly links arms with a colleague of Color and declares, "It's not about race but I have something to tell you" (signaling it is definitely about race). The colleague of Color--whose arm is still being held--is left wondering why in the world a White person would start an interaction in such a manner. How about a hello? Does she begin conversations with White people like this? And why does she feel entitled to grab me before telling me what is not about race? In this seemingly simple interaction is a plethora of emotional and mental racial dynamics, which in this article we term emo-cognitions. We use this term to capture the simultaneous interplay between cognitions and emotions. While these emo-cognitions and the behaviors they inform are generated from Whites, (1) they implicate people of color who must navigate them. Thus, a specific racial co-production is formed. We term this co-production racial cray-cray (cray-cray=an African-American euphemism for utter craziness); the crazy making that results from White denial of racial saliency (Gildersleeve, Croom, & Vasquez, 2011). While the White colleague's approach described above is certainly a sign of White entitlement, it is also a sign of racial anxiety; an emotional condition that is routinely produced in interracial conversations that hint to race. In the example above, given that it has been racially framed (through the disclaimer that it isn't about race), it would be reasonable for the colleague of color to offer her racial perspective on the situation her White colleague wants to share. Yet the surfacing of material that Whites recognize as racial appears to be an implicit cue for definitive claims such as, "But it's not about race because I'm not a racist!" People of color are left to wonder what reality Whites inhabit. What?! What are you talking about? How can you not see this?! In seeking to understand the emo-cognitions that undergird these dynamics, we ask, "What is the condition that compels whites to so consistently perform these behaviors, and how does it impact people of color?" We conceptualize the predictability of these White responses as a kind of pre-existing emo-cognitive neurosis that erupts whenever colorblind ideology is challenged. Bonilla-Silva (2006) documents these responses in his study of colorblind White racism. He states, "Because the new racial climate in America forbids the open expression of racially based feelings, views, and positions, when Whites discuss issues that make them uncomfortable, they become almost incomprehensible--I, I, I, I don't mean, you know, but ...--" (p. 68). Probing forbidden racial issues results in verbal incoherence--digressions, long pauses, repetition, and self corrections. He suggests that this incoherent talk is a function of talking about race in a world that insists that race does not matter. In this article, we focus on the emotional and cognitive context that underlies whiteness. We employ interdisciplinary approaches of critical Whiteness studies and critical race theory to entertain how common White responses to racial material stem from the need for Whites to deny race, a traumatizing process that begins in childhood. First, we begin with an overview of the interconnected property of race to show how this co-production is linked. Then we offer an emotional-based perspective of White racialization and how such a racialization impacts emo-cognitive behaviors. We then overlay how those expressed behaviors, White neurosis, co-produce racial cray-cray. Finally, inspired by the creative works of critical race scholar Derrick Bell (1987, 1992) who wrote parables to illustrate how mechanisms of White supremacy work their way into the everyday fabric of American life, we also weave a parable, counterstories, and a poetic letter through the article to illuminate how racial cray-cray operates. "

read more here

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Beyond-the-Face-of-Race%3A-Emo-Cognitive-Explorations-Matias-Diangelo/a92f9bf38bfb942e73d84e30cf4096b3b7ead9ff

Oddly enough, it is scholarly work like this that makes every white-non white interaction more and more awkward....

I found it easier to form more honest relationships in the 90’s and 2000’s, than I do today. When the woke bogeyman is lurking around every corner, it becomes almost impossible to view anybody through a non racial Lens....

In many ways the prevailing social mood is it’s own self fulfilling prophecy....

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we see the leftist emo cra-cra
but not much leftist cognition
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5tOPsKjT2s

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1. Options to participate
Premium
Join a small group with an instructor (at most 10 students)
Participate in discussions and Q&A
Tuition: $1,200. Scholarships available, please inquire when you apply

Free (coming soon)
Read, watch and listen to the content on your own
Available later this summer—sign up for the mailing list to get announcements

I've been watching some of the videos, which are excellent (and free).

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under maga trump the people ran out of toilet paper
in soviet russia, they ran out of bread
but their behinds were clean.

+1imposter
+1 sorta funny

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Actually, this is untrue. The soviets had a very difficult time making and distributing toilet paper in the 60s and 70s. However, they did have East German newspapers to use.

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accept no substitutes
didn't the president recently get censored for suggesting mail in ballots
would lead to voter fraud & didn't the lumpen intelligentsia shit all over him. bet we don't read this in the newwoketimes.con
1 in 5! mail in ballots rejected in paterson new jersey due to fraud

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2020/06/26/1_in_5_ballots_rejected_as_fraud_is_charged_in_nj_mail-in_election_143551.html

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Behinds clean only cuz they had so many worthless roubles

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marxist barniesanders claimed the ussr had plenty of bread
mebbe he meant bread as a euphemism for worthless rubles

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3. Well done, for both Fast Grants and Krogan. This blog is called marginal revolution, small steps toward a much better world. I'm not sure people appreciate how great leaps forward are made by small steps taken by extraordinary people who work mostly independently. For some reason people have come to believe big business is the path of innovation and progress. Not sure why.

>For some reason people have come to believe big business is the path of innovation and progress. Not sure why.

So says the idiot typing onto a keyboard in his underwear, in his basement, so that the entire world has the potential of hearing his idiocy.... all of which is made possible by the "innovation of big business."

PS But but but .... Al Gore! DARPA in the 1970s! Please display your idiocy about this. Please!

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#2. Intellectual: one who deems hypertrophy of the mind just compensation for constipation of the soul.

(Somewhat related, perhaps possibly maybe . . . Idealism: the cheery midwife officiating at the births of Pessimism, Cynicism, and Nihilism.)

(And not wholly unrelated . . . Reason: the mental faculty that placates our separate volitions in order to confirm us in our common prejudices.)

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And nothing about the quite interesting Wirecard scandal? It will have many effects on Germany.

https://www.ft.com/content/f62f7f56-3d45-492c-ae88-172948d21eb8

Story of the week, it was definitely the only topic anyone was discussing at work on Friday

We’re taking bets on whether/when EY collapses.

Also taking bets on how quickly EY spins off Parthenon.

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2. Oh, that is such a good essay. A great diagnosis.

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#4 "In a few places, it’s very much under control and then in other places, like certain parts of the United States and Brazil, it’s not at all under control."

Fake news. The situation is under control in Brazil. Field hospitals are being dismantled due to low demand, the Army has stockpilled enough chloroquine to last for years, more than 700,000 Brazilians hhve recovered from COVID-19, the major cities have reopened their economies and Rio de Janeiro State has resumed its soccer championship and Actiong Healthcare Minister Divisional Genersl Pazuello has stated his Ministry will be able to produce millions of Oxford vaccines before Christmas. All things considered, the happy days are here again.

>the Army has stockpilled enough chloroquine to last for years...

Very good point sir. Brazilian lupus sufferers and those exposed to malaria can sleep safely.

I am not so sure how this fact relates to SARS2 of course. Perhaps you own stocks in Surgisphere?

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#4

Great line towards the end of the interview ". I think another thing that I particularly said at the time was that if we’re going to condemn protesting, we have to even more strongly condemn everybody who goes to a casino, everybody who goes to an indoor restaurant, every governor who advances that amount of reopening, "

Both are being vigorously condemned.

It is so sweet to have someone else to look down upon.

The Democrat/Republican stood and prayed God, I thank You that I am not like other men, not wearing masks/wearing masks, protesting with guns/ protesting in the streets, adulterers or even as this Republican/Democrat. I maintain social distance/go to church, I give tithes of all that I possess."

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#2 and #6 are similar.

The temptation is to think that these are mistakes, by accident. I tend to look at this stuff as working as designed.

The structure looks like this; at the top are a bunch of above the fray generalists who are extraordinarily competent at making themselves unaccountable, and able to impress with their grandiose worldviews. Usually dictated directly from God himself.

Below that are the obedient drones. Selected as smarter than average but not too smart they are educated in a worldview. They are stupid enough to be easy targets of those above looking for ways to shuffle accountability to the nearest target, and smart enough to run fiefdoms and maintain their sinecures.

Below them all are the hoi polloi, purposely poorly educated, deplorable and unenlightened. When the exquisitely designed schemes of their betters fail catastrophically they can be called lazy, racist, uninformed. Sinners.

It all is well when the alms, the indulgences, taxes, even lives are paid upwards to keep the sinecures stable and safe.

I saw a system like this collapse once, within a generation. Mostly bloodlessly. I've never seen such a group of deserving victims.

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2. I agree that conformity and cancel culture are bad (though the extent of those things is debatable). But I don't see how people can equate reckoning with a country's historical sins with barbarism. We see that Germany and even Japan to a great extent do acknowledge their past sins and have not fallen into barbarism. To the contrary, these countries have become far more peaceful, prosperous, and benevolent by acknowledging the bad stuff they did in the past and agreeing not to go anywhere close to that bad stuff again in the future.

America just succeeded at imperialism where Germany and Japan failed: it conquered an entire vastly wealthy continent, killed or subdued the indigenous people, and built an economic powerhouse in part on slavery before all that stuff became socially unacceptable. The Nazism and Imperialism that Germany and Japan now apologize for were expressly modeled after trying to turn Eastern Europe for Germany and Manchuria for Japan into what the vast western frontier was for the United States. Of course, those bad actions were all done in the past by people who are long dead, but we are still enjoying the benefits and prosperity of those actions today. We ought to acknowledge that legacy, and although the pendulum may have swung too far in some ways, it is good that people are finally challenging the whitewashed, creationism-style history that most Americans used to be taught in school.

What more must be “reckoned” with? Slavery was ended over 160 years ago.

Red lining
Jim Crow
Anti density land use regulations

Some of those things Black voters are against but a lot of them happily vote Democrat and seem to be happy with the segregation that comes along with “affordable or public” housing, land use regulation, public schools etc.

I’ve yet to see a black activist get really vocal about ending the implicit segregation caused by land use regulation.

So how exactly are we atoning for any sins?

Even in South Florida where there is a black ghetto in the northwest Quadrant of every city on the eastern seaboard, I never hear African American thought leaders asking for a change to reconciliation for that historical injustice.

There has to be some acknowledgement by the black community that real change is gonna happen at the local level....

It doesn't sound like you know anything about black activism, which frequently addresses the topics you self-satisfyingly point out as if you are the first person to ever recognize their importance.

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A leftist protest just tore down a statue of an abolitionist and beat up a democratic state senator in Madison, Wisconsin. These are not considered intellectual disagreements but iconoclast mob rule. History does not suggest an intellectual impulse is behind them.

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Germany and Japan did it within a single generation, many, if not most, of perpetrators and their victims were still alive then.

What's happening in America currently is the opposite. Who here still lives from "1619"? 1860? or even 1920? The "progressive" movement is now a blend of fascism, religion (original sin of being white and other unfalsifiable woke claims) and borderline black supremacy demands (jobs and school admission, and admissible behaviors based on color).

"We" are enjoying the benefits and prosperities of "those bad actions" because our ancestors fought and died for us. That is life, it is an endless struggle. There will always be people who rationalize their transgressions against "others" for their own benefit, much like what the "progressives" are doing now.

I say this as a minority. My grandfather fought Japan. My father fought the communist. I fought white supremacist and crazed creationist in the 90s.

Today, I fight a different group: those that denounce reason, logic and science; those that preach love and tolerance but are intolerant themselves (à la Popper); those that accuse people as racist, fascist and bigots to rationalize their own transgressions, yet they are themselves everything they accuse others to be.

Today, I fight the insane progressives. Are you one of them?

"Hey, Lenin was already dead in 1991. No need to throw his statues away."

Are you retarded or something?

Classic tactic: bringing up wholly unrelated topics to make straw man arguments, in this case "statues", while utilizing personal attacks (retarded).

Did I mention anything about statues? Nope, not once, but good job projecting. Here is yet another example the progressives and anti-racists are racists themselves:

Cali legislature has voted to DELETE these words (aca 5) from its state const.

"The state shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin."

Why? Simply to discrimination in order achieve so called "equity". As Kendi (a black supremacist who pretends to be *anti-racist*) puts it:

"The defining question is whether the discrimination is creating equity or inequity. If discrimination is creating equity, then it is antiracist."

Truly insane the length supremacist would go to rationalize discrimination based on race, sex, and color.

The fact you Nazis are scared is the best possible proof things are going well. Well, except for the Trump-amplified epidemics, obviously.

Sir, only those that proclaim they are not racists are racists. Accordingly, you are every bit as racist as the person to whom you replied. Repent and admit your sins or we will draw our own conclusions.

Warm regards,

Kafka

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you should check out the video of the leftist berserker/protester going off on that uber dignified fella in front of the lincoln statue yesterday.

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ok nazi O.

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"Germany and Japan did it within a single generation, many, if not most, of perpetrators and their victims were still alive then."

The also lost a war and unconditionally surrendered. Two very important distinctions somehow not noted in this thread.

Agreed.

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Do you honestly think the Confederacy did not lose the war and unconditionally surrender?

The comment by Zaua is about the genocides and slavery and so forth by the United States as a whole, not what the Confederate states did in their less than 4 years of existence. Hence the entity that would have to "lose the war" in Reason's reply would be the United States.

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Also the construction of your second paragraph is terrible:

“ America just succeeded at imperialism where Germany and Japan failed: it conquered an entire vastly wealthy continent, killed or subdued the indigenous people, and built an economic powerhouse in part on slavery before all that stuff became socially unacceptable.”

There were NO Americans. They never existed. There were interest groups like the Yankees, the tidewater, the Barbadian slave lords of the Deep South. They came to this country at different times, practiced different religions, had radically different views towards natives, blacks, capitalism, and slavery in general.

The collective “we Americans” conquered as imperialists in the 17th has no functional meaning.

There would be no USA without the Deep South slave lords. Had the Yankees and tidewater elites not acquiesced on the plantation slavery system in the South, the slave lords would of simply supported the crown back in England.

Remember the founding fathers are made up of Yankee and tidewater elites. The Barbadian slave lords of the south were basically a placated interest group. Hence the reason 100 years later that their descendants were so happy to become confederates.

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The Germans and Japanese actually did bad things - some times to people who were still alive. Arresting them all was not possible so we went for the second best thing.

Not a single Black person alive today has been damaged by Slavery or the Confederacy. Very few have suffered in any way from segregation - you would have to be well over 60 to have even been at school at the time. Black Americans are the best off African-descended population in the world. Even if they were stiffed of 40 acres and a mule back in 1865, the current value of that is roughly zero.

Whites get shaken down by race hustling because they are basically good people. A nation of 300 million Ned Flanders. If they were the malevolent race baiters of media reporting, they would not be worth shaking down. Try asking the Russians for reparations for anything. They are not so stupid.

Whites have nothing to atone for.

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I kind of wonder what the "whitewashed" Disneyfied version of American history comes into your imagination from.

It seems like historical American art talks about the defeats of the Indians all the time. Just not in terms you seem to think they should.

But this is because you believe that America benefitted from the exploitation of wealth vastly. Rather than they were simply what they were: a civilization in its bones and principles and institutions vastly more able to innovate and become productive than that of backwards China and backwards East Asia and Europe generally.

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5. Accurate story. At the end of the day though Singapore has rule of law, Deng Xiaoping understood that, but Xi Jinping has repudiated that along with any shred of Dengism..

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#6: Two key elements in successful management include knowing what will fail and require costly rework/redesign and how to avoid principal-agent problems.

Emphasizing internal promotion and organizational loyalty helps greatly as short term problems can't be papered over and the individual knows their success is tied to the success of the organization.

By continually moving you get to see more, including more failure modes, but they have to be relevant to the situation at hand to be useful. Industry knowledge value in management can greatly depend on whether the problems you expect to encounter are industry specific (you had bad engineering designs that someone familiar would recognize) or management specific (you signed off on a type of financing that will kill you by generating a liquidity crunch).

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The interview with Marc Lipsitch is so plain and devoid of any new insights. What is the point of it? It highlights the point that we shouldn't rely on epidemiologists to save the world the pandemic. They work on an academic time-scale and are the wrong set of specialists to help us out with exponential growth and fat-tailed stuff.

In their recent PNAS article, Siegenfield, Taleb, and Bar-Yam state this about covid modeling:

"More generally, the use of models in pandemic response showcases a key difference between academically relevant research and policy-relevant analysis. The former can tolerate assumptions and models that are exploratory in nature, increasing our knowledge of the wide range of conditions that might happen at some time in the future or some location—or even in an alternative reality—thereby increasing the scope of our understanding. The latter must focus on validated assumptions and real-world risk, including uncertainty in both our data and our understanding."

Epidemiologists (in academia and public health agencies) are squarely in the "academically-relevant research" category and do not have a good understanding of policy-relevant analysis.

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3 there seems to be some decrease in hospitalization and ICU numbers compared to infections. Are any of these treatment ideas finding application yet?

A lot of it is due to the average age at infection dropping.
I am not sure how much Remdesivir is being used. It's in short supply. It seems to have efficacy when given early in the infection. It's in RCT right now. Gilead is also working on an inhaled version that people could take at home ( it's an IV now).
• The steroid Dexamethasone was found to reduce deaths in patients on ventilators by one-third and by one-fifth in patients who required oxygen only. No benefits were found in those who did not need respiratory assistance.( preliminary results)
• lopinavir-ritonavir, HIV drugs are also in RCT. The Chinese in Wuhan published good results from it
• Tocilizumab also an RCT useful in the cytokine/immune response gone amok phase of the disease
• There are others, but no magic bullets, just drugs that possibly offer some modest improvement in outcomes.
• I think Remdesivir/Tocilizumab may be the most promising combination right now.
The work Krogan and team are doing is great. . It’s basic research revealing pathways and protein interactions then experimenting in vitro to find which drugs act best on these pathways, such as kinase inhibitors. The most promising ones would then be selected for RC trials

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#2. Kind of disappointed in my old hero, George. Seems to be pretty obscure exactly what his complaint is, sort of like the people he is complaining about. Intellectuals can’t think? Falsely describe current events to push forward their own views?

“Same as it ever was...”. Talking Heads.

Is this the best that he can come up with as the American south confronts its war and Jim Crow guilt?

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A black baby come out from between a white woman’s legs? Well you better get used to the sight.... all empires gotta fall sometime. United States of Africa good luck with that

I don’t consider myself racist but I’ll be dammed picturing my white wife s***ting out a black baby

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Being PC and giving handouts to lazy n*****s and letting white women s*** out these tar babies to replace the hardworking white man. Yeah, just keep doing that

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2. Another serious problem is family disintegration — e.g., 40 percent of all births, and 69 percent of all African American births, to unmarried women.

How is that a problem when it's a product of design? The bureaucratic/government complex has had this as a goal for several generations, which is to atomize the individual and make his/her most important relationship to the state. Government policies are aimed at individuals, not families, clans, tribes, etc. The family, especially an extended one, is meaningless except for the hereditary oligarchs of Will's intelligencia, the Kennedys, the Gores, the Bushes, the Adams.

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With the Chinese and Indians it’s their stinky food and lack of hygiene, but with the blacks it’s like... their fundamental essence, their SKIN just stinks like crazy I can’t stand black people in the locker room. God cursed these people

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#6 chimes very much with my experience of the civil service, but on a smaller scale.

We had a problem with people leaving and taking their knowledge with them. This was named an "instituational memory" issue. There was a two pronged approach to dealing with it.

First, make people keep a better record of what they're doing and why they're doing it. This makes sense, but it's the first thing to go when people are busy. When the initiative started people did it but it didn't last.

The second was to adopt a "matrix management" system where people worked across different areas. The idea being that knowledge would be less concentrated in individuals.

The latter was successful at reducing institutional memory loss, but only by preventing building institutional memory in the first place.

Also, compensating with consultants does not work.

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2. I guess, but who canceled who first?

If I read you right, I think so. Item 2 was funny because it was a "rant for reason."

What would the reasoned, Spock-mind, version be?

1) It is important to recognize problems
2) It is important to quantify their negative effects
3) It is important to rank problems by the magnitude of those effects
4) commensurate resources may be marshaled (public or private) in response, and in that order

But saying something like that is far different than (as this column does) listing people you're mad at. It's too short for a column anyway. Not enough space for in-line advertising.

(Note that an "intelligentsia" doesn't have to be top-IQ for that, just diligent.)

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P.S. - If I believe in the Spock-mind approach, items 1-4, then it is entirely reasonable that I would be antagonistic to regimes which represent an antithesis.

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Progress Studies? That's not even a STEM. What can kids actually do with Progress Studies? Studying Progress Studies unironically will set these kids back. African Studies but for neolibs?

Is this some form of technology and capitalism cheerleading? Nothing wrong with that given the cynicism of the Left and now BLM white privilege PC that will pervade society for some time.

Though "progress studies" almost sounds like some religion for neolibs but superficially worshiping technology, no philosophy, seems like no questioning allowed within the thesis given your manifesto in The Atlantic.

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#2: the reason our intelligentsia are so stupid these days is that they have been taught that the worst possible thing is to be unpopular, to disbelieve the narrative. In addition, they've grown up in a comfy world and are lazy. Being truly smart is hard work and is likely to make you unpopular.

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George F. Will peaked back in 2009 with his column about how the wearing of jeans was the downfall of America

https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/15/AR2009041502861.html?nav=rss_opinion/columns

Didn't William Safire denounce the use of poor grammar as a moral failing? Does anyone else recall that piece?

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5. Yeah ... Singapore is basically a technocracy. A really effective one, and illustrates alternatives to democracy really well, but there is basically no contest for this election.

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Re: #2, methinks the pot doth call the kettle lumpen

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2. “Today’s most serious problem, which annihilates thoughtfulness about all others, is that a significant portion of the intelligentsia — the lumpen intelligentsia — cannot think.”
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If they thought things through they would be horrified.

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6. Managerialism and civil service.
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Too many lists and too little theory of value added chain which is what the author is looking for.

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> a significant portion of the intelligentsia — the lumpen intelligentsia — cannot think.

Oh man.

How much time do we want to give Tyler on this one?

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6. Maybe politicians and their voters just do not value "infrastructure". A much simpler theory, not requiring the bad-faith arguments so common among pro-tech rationalists.

6 also has a lot of really terrible cause-effect thinking. "Business-oriented managers cause firms to decline!" No, business-oriented managers are likely chosen when the firm is forgetting its purpose to deliver profits to shareholders, or if the industry needs to learn that too.

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#2...Robert E Lee was offered the leadership of the Union Army by Lincoln. Although he claimed to oppose secession, he decided to stand by his people. That's treason, pure and simple. Imagine if he would have taken Lincoln's offer, how different the war might have turned out.

Andrew Jackson was a slaveholder. True. But when SC mentioned secession, I think he said he would personally lead the army down to SC and hang the traitors himself. He stood for the idea of one country.

I keep statues of Jackson, but not Lee. Jackson wasn't perfect, but he did some good things. My point is that it's not impossible to make choices, & that's what we'll have to do. On the other hand, some issues, for example, complex social issues, even when people bring good will in dealing with them, are going to take some time.

That's treason, pure and simple.

Not if the traitor wins, as in the case of the American Revolution. Nobody ever held an election to see if the North American British colonies should embrace treason and go to war with the United Kingdom.

And your point is?

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# 4
Just about nothing is really answered, and nothing is really asked.
As Iggy Pop wrote "Blah Blah Blah"
"Q&A" "What Activities Are Safe as the Coronavirus Continues to Spread?
Questions are not asked about activities.
Answers are not given.

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From #4:

I would say protesting racial injustice is closer to something that people need to do to live, at least, for others to live

This epidemiologist offers no evidence that protests have any positive effect on life expectancy. I can tell you that from here in Chicago, they have coincided with a spike in homicide.

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