Monday assorted links

1. Fryer responds, in my opinion we are back to where we started after initial publication of his piece.

2. German wealth inequality is extreme.

3. Japanese building a dam almost entirely with robots.

4. Emmanuel Farhi has passed away, here is an earlier interview with him.

5. It was the later Harvard economist Robert Dorfman who came up with the pooled testing idea in 1943 to solve WWII problems.  To test recruits for syphilis, of course.

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5. In that case, we can just fake half the tests, taking inspiration from another syphilis study of that era.

pangolin fact of the day
jerry the penguin nadler claims the riots are a myth?
Do you disavow the violence from Antifa that’s happening in Portland right now? There’s riots—”
“That’s a myth that’s being spread only in Washington, D.C.,” Nadler replied.

denying the existence of riots
sounds like a trained marxist scam

not satire but is it treason?
its now being reported that the brookings employee got the russian disinformation from russian spies
at the end of the day
the russian hoax was a trained marxist scam

How can we promote health these patients? Planning the money first can be a misdirectijon of focus.
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Nadler must be misinformed. The police often riot when dealing with left wing protesters. They usually offer oral sex to right wing protesters, even the ones who point guns at them.

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"1. Fryer responds, in my opinion we are back to where we started after initial publication of his piece."

+1, excellent response regarding the level of civility and the conciseness to which he answered the other side.

Agreed. "It's simply not how most officer-involved shootings being as shown in the data." This is something that perturbs me no end regarding the current apoplexy vis a vis the police, most police interactions with 'a person' begin with a community or individual request for service or call of suspicious activity. George Floyd had is encounter with the police initiated by a call from a store owner to whom he passed a "bad $20".

This myth about cops running around 'hunting' for people or calls to respond to needs to end. That kind of activity, especially in high-density cities with a high population to police coverage ratio, is very very small. I know that in my city officers are 95% of the time moving from call-to-call, they rarely have an opportunity (especially these days) to simply drive around looking for broken windows.

I thought the complaint about Floyd was about how erratic he was and he was trying to get into his car. The clerk was afraid he'd kill someone driving. Not that he didn't attempt the fake bill.

That is not my understanding. An article I read in early June recounting the play-by-play indicated (and the evidence has been released) that the call in question was specific about the fake $20, and that it was the reportage of that crime - not anything otherwise suspicious - that precipitated the response.

Interesting fact about police response to counterfeiting, a friend of mine is an FBI forensic accountant and he indicated that they really do emphasize the need to 'pounce' quickly on counterfeiting incidents. This is not because they care about the fake $20, but because it often can be the key in getting to larger and more complex counterfeiting rings (including those run by foreign countries). It's just like DEA busts of street dealers leading to information taking them up the chain to major busts. I have a suspicion that it is that holistic focus that might have also precipitated the response to what most people would view as a petty crime call.

With respect to the George Floyd incident, how could the cops know whether or not Floyd knew the bill was counterfeit? Counterfeit money is different from drugs because, by definition, it is difficult for the average person to casually know that a bill is counterfeit and therefore illegal to possess. Without doing a proper investigation, police have no way of knowing whether someone like George Floyd is knowingly engaging in fraud or whether he is an innocent victim of someone else who passed off the counterfeit $20 as change or payment for an odd job. It is rare but not completely impossible for counterfeit notes to occasionally make their way into ATM machines, even.

People here need to go back to facts. Floyd had refused to take back the $20 bill, which the store clerk though was fake. Police was called for that reason.

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Ricardo my brother think of something else to say, stop pasting this same comment. Its understandable that you don't understand the laws of our Big Brother to the North so I'll respectfully break it down for you, my brother (pardon if you're a bot--Bot Lives and Colorless Green Ideas Matter, too).

American police responding to the call are required (required) to find out what happened and the citizen is required (required) to cooperate, even if, like most people being arrested claim, he never did anything wrong. Resisting is a crime and you can be arrested for that. Police are empowered to use all and only "necessary" force to effect the arrest. If the arrest is BS, the citizen can file a complaint or a lawsuit at the appropriate time and place. Our brother George would possibly not be dead today if he had done what he was supposed to do and most Black and other folks have enough sense to know to do.
Also do take note that policing is a local right and responsibility. POTUS Trump can't do jack about what happens in Minnesota. The American loon groups probably know this (it isn't their actual real agenda--which is more likely immigration, animal and trans rights, than anything related to the interests of Black career criminals.)

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Wow, I really really don't agree with Fryer, but he is a damn good writer.

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The cops DO hunt around for Blacks and Hispanics to harass. Who gets pulled over for a defective tail light? No, it isn't the white guy with the out of date plates. Who gets stopped and frisked just walking down the street? Not the white guy with an semi-automatic rifle. Who gets arrested for bringing a bottle of wine to a concert in a park? Whites get a pass on this. I'm white, and I see it all the time.

That true, Brother Kahlberg. I'm White as Caspar the friendly ghost and I walk around with a semi-automatic all the time and no cops ever accost me. On the contrary they great me warmly like a fellow Caucasian. My mom however is Black and the cops arrest her every time she steps out the door, for no reason at all, only because she's Black. It's like it's a crime to be Black in America. When will this injustice cease and desist? We have much to learn from Russia and China, not to mention North Korea, just to mention three countries that have achieved true social justice. There, Black women are equally free to walk around with fully-loaded semi-automatics.

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>we are back to where we started after initial publication of his piece.

This is what lefties say when they've lost an argument.

It usually goes: (1) take other guy out of context, get shot down (2) criticize the way you got shot down, get shot down even worse (3) change the subject to something completely unrelated, get shot down (4) make personal attack, get utterly destroyed (5) other guy says "You still have not offered one legitimate criticism of my statement X " (6) lefty comes roaring back with "Well we're back where we started."

You wanna cry? Has the Summer cured COVID-19 problem yet?

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2 - does it not count NPV of cash flows from private pension plans? Not even sure you can compare without them

Someone call prior

Private pension plans? How about the value of various benefits like subsidized housing, healthcare, education and of course unemployment benefits?

Those aren’t wealth. Those do affect disposal income metrics and are used when comparing country to country. That’s why we have that metric.

NPV of private pension plans are wealth. When assessing wealth of a typical citizen of country X, we should include them. Apparently 60% of German workers have them.

I don't agree that a health care benefit is not an asset. You are willing to include the flow of health care benefits as income. Conceptually a set of flows is convertible to an asset.

"I don't agree that a health care benefit is not an asset. "

It doesn't generate wealth on it's own. The money saved by not paying a higher cost for medical care is reflected in the current level of wealth. Adding it in as another asset would be double counting.

It is true that the money not spent in the past is accounted for in private assets today. So you are commenting about a portion of the benefit; not the entire benefit.

It's not double counting because you only counted the past.

As to whether it "generates wealth on it's own", absolutely because money not spent in the future is money that can be used to make you feel wealthier than otherwise.

It’s not an asset and it’s not wealth.

Find me the GAAP reg that says insurance is considered an asset.

I'm not sure if the premise is that we are discussing insurance. The premise is that there is a subsidy because that is what Freddo wrote at 2:08 PM.

A subsidy from a growing population is an asset. Germany's population increased 0.2% per year the past 5 years. If the average age increases too fast the subsidy might not be sustainable and there were times in the recent past when the population decreased.

If I have a coupon for 10% off at Autozone, is that an asset?

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Financial assets are present in the total.

The NPV of future pension payments are not in that metric so the point is moot.

+1, you don't count future payments in current wealth.

I'll have to have a word with my broker about this. My bonds and CDs get valued based on the interest stream and the repayment with some adjustment for callable bonds. I'll see if I can get Wall Street to change this kind of misinformation.

"My bonds and CDs get valued based on the interest stream and the repayment with some adjustment for callable bonds."

That's based on their resale value. They can be transferred/sold. So other buyers will value them according to those future payments. However, Pension payments can not be transferred and they generally have no residual value when you die. So, they don't count as wealth.

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Yet another inequality!

German GDP per capita at PPP is ca. 80% of US. Add some amenities not covered by mere GDP calculations, such as some mentioned in these comments, and Quality of Life looks pretty good.

No need to give a god damn about the wealth distribution!

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Where people accumulate claims to income instead of claims to capital, traditional wealth measures are meaningless. (You have to include the PV of claims to income as wealth.) Anyone who has ever been to Germany knows there are very few poor people, except perhaps in former East Germany, which is still integrating with the rest of the country.

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Right I tried to give Biden to Joe Kennedy but they killed a Garrett Cole who is the stolen Patriots ring Boston uses too attack the USA via cold war subversives, Garrett Cole and Joe Kennedy are tied via my stolen shit, I sorry like Joe Kennedy because marky mark and the fab book Facebook is used to attack the USA via Boston so, I'm fine but I have to own Biden too yay I already own most of the nukes my expensive things visible in the hood game is no fun.

He seems like a generic Democrat, bush uses the Texas Caroline to attack the Gop who won't support him, funny bush game. Annino Domini is revelations deaths for executions via coerced executions oh, well it can never be Jesus but if someone is shooting someone going to heaven then Jesus is near to collect his soul? I don't care

Aninis and Sapphira basically everyone can drop dead stealers and killers , I'm fine was Kennedy Cole because obviously I can't not be the white house

GPT-3 needs some work

There's a more advanced turing test for you -- emulate not the sensical minds but the nonsensical ones.

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Vlad doesn't need a Patriots ring because class my friend the thing is a forced leak to see where the attacks come from Boston DNC etc not really the senators it Kennedys just that place via Hoovers inst Shia's Maybe coakly has my giant check, and my leg and penis

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"2. German wealth inequality is extreme."

That looks more like relative poverty than inequality. The 50th percentile in Germany is less than the 20th percentile in the US. Even despite US healthcare being far more expensive, your median American can accumulate assets far more easily.

Hmmm, I was going off of US household wealth. But the twitter thread doesn't clarify if that's household wealth or individual wealth.

https://dqydj.com/net-worth-brackets-wealth-brackets-one-percent/

So, my post may well be wrong.

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Tell that to you typical American who has no assets, lots of debt, social insecurity and falling wages.

You are misinformed.

"The median net worth per household is $97,300."

https://dqydj.com/net-worth-percentile-calculator-united-states/

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Vlads cool. Kennedys are basically forced to defend themselves and didn't instigate and the Patriots Russian ring is the forced leak to show where the subversion comes from Boston DNC so aninis and Sapphira

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Right I own gates Buffett the Koch's and Tyler's my nuke warhead, remarkable also I own the euro and could own euroep as I'm Europe or it's some guy who I own somewhere espn was very studious and thrifty and after Disney bought espn I had earned the most nukes on the earth

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That, there just the usa's nukes, that Stalin JoJo guy is a fucking useless prick what's

the DNC ai is pretty good with powerful nuclear weapons and global Obamacrats most of the plague and the dncs moves are just DOD ai making everyone kill the democrats anyway tell the Germans they owe me like 10 billion

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They kept trying the Eastwood movie with the letter opener about Clinton's atherosclerosis and bypass and then they just started doing

Right, everything's just nuclear warheads the ai is the problem not the nukes the nukes were first few Obama years, lanza thinks they have to explode to make media programming events memorable events etc it's just anyway more Ted koepel and Tim russerts and tiger woods? Boston only likes the Aryans no sports or coaklys going to complain about the drunk Americans and their sports

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Now mostly it's coercion and terrorism and the DNC should be killed with the bush and Trump admin via debt collections and or aninias and Sapphira

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Why TC plays the petty game of looking how much each person has? How about improving economic efficiency?

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2. Germans rent. Americans buy. What do Germans know that Americans don't? Home ownership has been the US policy since after the end of WWII. An optimistic might conclude that home ownership allows folks of moderate means to participate in the magic of markets and rising prices. A skeptic might conclude that it's a scam, that in time a house is just a house and worth no more than the cost to build it, that the purpose of the policy is to trick all those homeowners into supporting policies that generate rising stock prices. I don't recall the Fed promising it would do "whatever it takes" to support home prices during the financial crisis and the great recession. The combination of home ownership and debt is America's version of universal incarceration. Germans own their cars (thus, the source of the net worth of the bottom half), Americans may "own" their cars and their homes, but they are under water.

I thought owning property was a requirement for the rule of law?

Lawless Germans!

The German nationalists were Kipling's lesser breed without the law.

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“The combination of home ownership and debt is America's version of universal incarceration.”

Great. First “violence” stopped meaning what it used to mean, and now incarceration doesn’t mean incarceration.

Hyperbole is sometimes a rhetorical device... in this case the literal meaning doesn't seem to be changed.

Admittedly, sometimes "violence" is used in a way that distorts the literal meaning. Shoot, if that happens enough, the OED will just adjust.

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It's the land, not the replacement cost of the house, that is the primary source of housing appreciation. My house is probably worth more as a teardown than as a house.

If you rent, you have no hedge against rent inflation, which adds up to a lot of money over decades. I would have difficulty paying the market rent on my house if I retired, but I don't have to because I hedged that risk by buying it. "Everyone is born short a roof over their head" - Samuelson.

That's why Germany has all sorts of weird ass rent controls. On the other hand, your landlord might get pissed if you stand up when you pee. (Really, there have been court cases on this. (I mean, who puts carpeting in the WC?))

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2) This might partially explain the low median household wealth in Germany despite a very high saving rate/trade balance.

The result doesn't pass a smell test, tho. There are lots of private wealth advisors in Germany who make a fortune. Most likely the soep data is bs. and people just forget about some wealth component or are reluctant to report.

I don't see any inconsistency at all.

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Let’s not forget that The median German worker makes less than 80 percent of the median income of the median American worker.

Not only are German middle and lower classes poorer than US counterparts they face a much bigger tax burden.

At least they have free health care and the state is heavily involved in subsiding education for all.

Is it worth it though?

Meanwhile, in the real world, https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Human_Development_Index#Countries .

Im not sure what this means, are you disputing the numbers given by Terry Richards? Or do you think the marginal difference in this index is more relevant?

I am saying one has to be crazy to ask if having one of the highest living standards of the world is worth it. Compared to what? Hooters and Walmart?

It’s not the difference between their current living standards which are some of the best in the world. Its that they could be even wealthier. Their best corporations could be even more important.

Where is the German Amazon? The German Apple? The German Twitter?

German capitalism is heavily regulated. Unions have ENORMOUS power. Lefties and center lefties tend to think that this economic model is the height of sophistication and the good life.

But once again, the crappy old US with its mouth breather populace offers its mouth breather citizens a higher standard of living simply because US capitalism is less foolishly regulated.

Even though the US has horrific public transportation, land use regulation, urban-civic design, horrific architecture, terrible politicians, way too expensive health care, a screwed up secondary education system etc. It still offers a much higher standard of living than any large Western European economy.

The US can inhale poor people at a much greater clip and give them jobs.

That's why we handle immigrants so well. The problem is that they are crummy jobs. Germans are weird. They'd rather have a million euros than a one in a million chance at winning two trillion euros. Every economist will tell you the latter bet outweighs the sure thing because the one thing everyone loves is uncertainty.

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Ok, so this is an appeal to imagined sophistication.

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"one of the highest living standards of the world" = Oktoberfest, Aldi and mega-brothels?

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Ever hear the one about the wall st kid who takes his first bonus and buys a 70K car ? His father tells him he's crazy and that he paid 70K for his first house. The kid replies, "i can sleep in my car but you can't drive a house"

And the Dad says 'yeah, but I could sell the house for 100k in ten years.'

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# 1 It is not that simple!

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#1. Again, I have to pay $20 to read Fryer's response to D&H comment. Again, if someone can share a copy, thanks.

I can read the first page of Fryer's reply. He refers to 3 points in D&H comment. To assess the exchange about the first one, first I have to read the arguments and I can't. To assess the exchange about the second one, we should remember that always there are limits to modeling all individual behavior relevant to the social interactions under study. I don't remember any study by either D or H in which they were sorry for not being able to take all behavior into account. And to assess the exchange about the third one, I insist that all researchers should verify the reliability and relevance of the data they use, starting with the source's reliability. Maybe police reports are far from reliable but I don't think that they are less reliable than any other data produced by government officials, including those hired just to produce data. We are talking about bureaucrats, not the politicians that often communicate the data without knowing anything about them. We should remember how costly is for others to verify the reliability of data. Again, I don't remember any study by either D or H in which they were concerned about the data reliability.

I'm surprised by Tyler's nonsense comment on the exchange. As most exchanges between researchers about their output, we now know a little more than at the beginning and hope they will continue working hard. I don't remember Tyler reacted with a similar comment on any of the thousands of papers referred to in MR --mostly papers that were not peer-reviewed.

I agree - that was a nonsensical and irritating comment.

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The key point is that Heckman doesn't understand the data. The data is 90% from 911 calls, where the closest officer is assigned to the call. There is no officer discretion in the encounter. Fryer can also look at different types of calls (murder, rape vs. less extreme) and contrast 911 calls vs other encounters. His results hold across all these encounters. Yes its not the formal empirical strategy that economists worship (but is frequently wrong -look at all the BS IV studies) but common sense says that if there is a biased selection in encounters than you should be able to see it through looking at different types of encounters. Fryer admits that the descriptions of incidents do come from the officers - but points out that there is no other conceivable way of getting that data.

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"At least they have free health care "

Germans don't have "free" health care. They have mandatory health insurance laws. They have to pay for health insurance. It is subsidized, but it's not "free".

https://www.expatrio.com/living-germany/costs-living-germany/costs-health-insurance-germany#costs-of-public-health-insurance-in-germany

The European model is a combination of high taxes and lots of subsidized services that include an insurance component. Health care works like a tax if you are making money, but if you lose your job, you don't lose health care. You have to pay for certain things if you are working but still get them if you aren't, It's like the defense budget in the US. You pay taxes for a nuclear deterrent, but if you are out of a job, you get that nuclear deterrent for "free".

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2. It's because home ownership is much less common in Germany versus the US, although they do have some pretty strong tenant rights to rental housing (so effectively tenants have long-term homes even if they don't own equity in them).

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I see Dr. Uhlig is off of time-out.

Is that the turing test fail above cluttering up the comments with ramblings?

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#3. The Japanese think of robots differently than we do. In his history of Japanese robots, Inside the Robot Kington, Fredrik Schodt tells of the early days of industrial robots in Japan. When a robot was brought on line the workers could hold a Shinto ceremony to welcome the new worker to the factory floor. Schodt, as some of you may know, is a translator who has worked closely with the late Osamu Tezuka. In particular, he translated Texuka's Astro Boy stories. Perhaps the central theme of those stories is respect and civil right for robots. Moreover, as far as I can tell from watching anime, the Japanese are not nearly so worried about super-intelligent robots as we are. Perhaps that's one reason Elon Musk likes anime?

They thought the company would be better off with the robots. They didn't think they were going to lose their jobs to the robots.

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Nice comment, Dr, Po (or Dr. Buckra). We can learn much from our friends in Brazil.

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Half the comments to this post have nothing to do with it. Please stop!

I'm sure you think you are clever but it's as inconsiderate as farting a tune in an elevator.

"I'm sure you think you are clever but it's as inconsiderate as farting a tune in an elevator."

I doubt he's trying to be clever. He's trying to shut the thread down by posting tons of nonsense posts.

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2. All Northern European countries seem to have very high levels of wealth inequality even with low levels of income inequality. According to this, based on wealth rather than income, Sweden is more unequal than China and about as unequal as Brazil and Russia. Germany is not far behind. Other European countries are more equal, though the USA is least equal of all.

http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_Forum_IncGrwth_2018.pdf

I hate hate HATE garbage links that don't say what they are purported to say. Why waste everyone's time? Just hoping no one will check so you can look like you have a clue?

There’s a chart on page 11 that shows wealth Gini indexes for different countries.

Why would you use this link for that? Buried as a subset of some unsorted table 10 pages in?

Anyway USA may be "worst" but about the same as Sweden, and also Norway, Denmark, Ireland, Germany

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A nice related piece on American inequality and health over at Knowable Magazine.

Lmao. Why even link obvious garbage.

We have changed from a country that, in the 1950s, believed in economic justice. We had high tax rates on the rich, and we had welfare programs for other people. But we have changed from a community focus, or a collective focus, to one in which today we have to pursue our health as individuals.

Effective tax rate 1950s, 99th percentile income: 30%
Effective tax rate 2015: 99th percentile income: 26%

Health spending 1950s: 0.8% GDP
Health spending 2015: 17.8% GDP

Okay Boomer

You don't seem to be taking on the actual thrust of the piece, upon which, more here:

The growing gap in life expectancy by income (NIH)

(I would say the author is well left of me, but I can hear him out. It's not like we are the ones with the best childhood mortality, or total life expectancy, with nothing else to learn.)

In this thread anonymous stumbles upon the fact that conscientiousness and internal discount rates affect longevity.

It would be really weird if Asians in NYC, easily the poorest demographic in the five boroughs had the highest life expectancy rates.

So I'm sure it scales linearly with income. Right?

I think it is kind of telling *when* you are this combative and unhelpful.

I think it might be when there is a positive change to make in the world.

Just wait till he finds out that when controlling for IQ and conscientiousness there's no statistical significance left when regressing on Income.

Oh well.

Better attack the messenger for speaking the truth. Obviously someone with knowledge wants to not make positive changes in the world, otherwise they would agree with him reflexively. Why should facts and reality even matter?

From the Knowable link:

"In the US, the child mortality rate — that is, the proportion of children who die before their fifth birthday per 1,000 live births — is 6. Compare that with Slovenia’s child mortality rate of 2.6, which shows what is achievable."

I think we should be able to match Slovenia. Is that so wrong? What kind of person angrily insists we can't?

Lol, Boomer. It's almost comical how terribly your Fisher King mental model of the world maps to reality.

What's the rate of child mortality for Slovenians in the US?

Thanks

Appeal to missing data, to justify "no we can't."

Sad.

So you have no evidence whatsoever.

Thanks for playing, White Boomer. You're now on the level of 'why have evidence to support anything?'

Unsurprising. Keep tilting!

I gave 2 links to your 0.

The issue is you never read them

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Here's a hint: find a first generation immigrant study with infant mortality rates higher than their native country once adjusted for disabled abortion rate.

That would actually be evidence.

Why are you trying to distract us with such demands?

Do you think childhood mortality is fine at 6 per 1000? Do you think we should not try for 2.6?

Weird hobby.

Yes, let's go back to the 1950s with no Great Society programs!

That would be positive change when we cared about economic justice before the Me-Me-Me Boomers ruined everything!

It is starting to sound like "hey, let's try to reduce child mortality" is "progressive"

And "whatever child mortality is, it's fine" is "conservative"

Sad, but it perhaps does help us understand the response to 150,000 coronavirus deaths.

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#2 I would expect that a more generous social safety would increase wealth inequality, especially if you don't include the value of likely SS payments as wealth.
I also think credit cards substitute for savings.

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4. RIP. So young , so talented.

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It has been revealed that Mauritius is a legitimate part of the Federative Republic of Brazil. That is why one of its islands is called Rodrigues, a typical Brazilian surname.

Yes, I have heard about that. It makes sense. I think under Brazilian leadership, Mauritius will develop fast.

Aye, laddie, all po'or tae the Brazilian masses!

Sorry, I only speak the Queen's English.

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#1: Strictly speaking, Fryer is in a *stronger* position than he started, as the first volley against him was as easily refuted as anyone with half-a-brain would have expected.

Really, did anyone think Fryer had ignored Stats 101 ideas like "Police stop more blacks, so you better account for that in your statistics?" The researchers who countered him must have realized this, but tried to discredit him anyway. Fryer can't say this in a publication, but we can- shame on them.

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You have to account for the fact that germany is the most popular immigration country for low skilled workers because of very generous social systems.

Then what about the US?

What’s the immigration on low skilled versus Germany?

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1. Fryer racial difference in police shootings of not...

Is it simply Fryer says there's no evidence of racial difference in police shootings, and the other guys saying absence of evidence is not evidence of absence?

Choose your level of understanding:

Level 1: An open debate about an interesting finding- that cops are not more likely to kill blacks than whites controlling for the situation.

Level 2: An attempt by two progressive researchers to disparage a result they didn’t like, which is promptly refuted by the original author.

Level 3: The beginnings of an attempt to destroy the reputation and ‘cancel’ the author of the study. The author humiliates them by indirectly calling their reading ability into question.

"Level 3: The beginnings of an attempt to destroy the reputation and ‘cancel’ the author of the study."

It's the Level 3 that is truly dangerous for society. There's been an attempt by the Left to destroy Jordan Peterson's reputation and Charles Murray reputation.

Indeed, the top hit on Google for Charles Murray currently using an anonymous login is a hit piece by the Southern Law Poverty Center:

"Charles Murray, a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, has become one of the most influential social scientists in America, using racist pseudoscience and misleading statistics to argue that social inequality is caused by the genetic inferiority of the black and Latino communities, women and the poor."

That's not even close to a fair reading of his work. It's the least charitable interpretation of his work by his worst enemies. And yet it's the top link on Google at this time.

Fan of Charles Murray, are you?

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/3/27/15695060/sam-harris-charles-murray-race-iq-forbidden-knowledge-podcast-bell-curve

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/12/books/review-human-diversity-charles-murray.html

He's a well known scholar with some well written books. So yes I am. And I'm well aware that the Left wants to make any discussion of racial IQ off limits. Personally, I don't think that IQ by race is particularly enlightening. It doesn't seem to explain much. Culture seems to explain a whole lot more. But Charles Murray makes some good arguments, and the Left's reactions mostly seem to be to nitpick the details in the form of a Gish Gallup argument or to argue just discussing it makes anyone involved a racist.

Are you implying that liking the books of Charles Murray makes me a racist?

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Major fail regarding German inequality - you must factor in social security and entitlements as "wealth" before you assess wealth inequality.

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3546668

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