Tuesday assorted links

1. “My thought is that the fact that we consume contemporary media in isolation has made made people more receptive to demonization, with its totalitarian characteristics. This is probably accentuated by the virus-induced isolation, which increases our use of contemporary media and reduces our social interactions.”  More here from Arnold Kling.

2. Did Southeast Asian fish sauce come from ancient Rome?

3. Indian Matchmaking.  Note that foreign exoticization, and thus partial concealment of anti-PC attitudes and pproaches, is one response to “things being cancelled.”  For instance: “Let’s remove this thing from the status games being fought by white people, and maybe they won’t care very much.”  And they don’t.

4. This Kevin Lewis link about whether hedonism leads to happiness was first sent to my spam blocker.

5. DNC Platform Committee decisively defeats Medicare for All as a proposal.  POTMR.

6. Why has the Spanish response to coronavirus been so poor?

7. “Divergence dates between #SARSCoV2 and the bat #sarbecovirus reservoir were estimated as 1948 (95% HPD: 1879–1999), 1969 (1930–2000) and 1982 (1948–2009), indicating that the lineage giving rise to SARS-CoV-2 has been circulating unnoticed in bats for decades”  Link here.

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>we consume contemporary media in isolation has made made people more receptive to demonization

Uh-huh. Sure thing.

Four straight years of NYT/CNN/WaPo "reporting" that Trump is Hitler, Satan, and a Russian spy has absolutely nothing to do with it.

Did you read the article? NYT/CNN/WaPo have a great deal to do with it, as they are counting on and exploiting this phenomenon.

I guess he never read Marshall McLuhan - TV and radio are quite different. TV viewers are passive receptacles where radio demands active attention.

Per Jerry Nadler - no violence in Portland. It's a myth.

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Millions of people droning out watching and reading polarizing content on their Iphones while simultaneously ignoring how nice most people are if you simply stop to say "Hello". Gross oversimplification, but there is something to it.

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There is a lot to be made for the argument of anger and shock as marketing device. Think about it...you can do no better getting people to pay attention to something...anything really than to make them mad as hell. A lot of modern media is a neuroses/rage factory, implicitly designed to get you engaged one way or the other, it just so happens that currently anger and outrage are the preferred methods.

And oh yeah, anger and rage can be addicting. And which tech companies have been proven to use the science of addiction in the crafting of their algorithms and strategies? Yep.

"There is a lot to be made for the argument of anger and shock as marketing device. "

Obviously. Rush Limbaugh, Jon Stewart, Sean Hannity, Rachel Maddow, etc have all used shock and anger to sway people's emotions.

Is not like the others.

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Listen to Fox channel from another room - turned up loud the way seniors and many others do - the specific content becomes less intelligible, so you notice the use of sound dynamics, and relentless fast pacing, jarring transitions, etc. and the repetitive constant issuance of threats and warnings about everything from riots to killer bees to superstorms.

a drum beat of adrenaline stoking, turned up to 11

+1, this is true. Of course it's also true of MSNBC and to a lessor extent CNN.

Indeed. They all do it. But Fox is still the king.

"They're all ankle-biting children but that one is the worstest and meanest"

That is what your response sounds like.

"That is what your response sounds like."

I believe you.

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You haven't watched Fox lately. Except for a few of the prime-time shows, the whole station has taken a swing to the left, since Rupert Murdoch turned it over to his sons, who are very much on the left. They gave a nice contribution to Biden. The radio news is even worse. So, realistically, there is no network on the right.

You are correct. I have not had the pleasure of listening to my father watching Fox News since pre-Covid days. And even then, I did my best to insulate his TV room from the rest of the house when I visited.

As for Lachlan. Well, it's rare that the children have the pure drive and balls of the father. I mean, they grew up rich, and they often grew up observing that their father is a sociopath and a lousy dad.

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When did "if it bleeds, it leads" get coined in for profit media?

Nothing new, just extremely amplified.

Another aspect that radically changed is the MSM being consolidated and taking blatant viewpoints.

I think the distrust in the elites can be summarized in random dissidents in Hong Kong and Iran as being more valued by the political and media class than regular people in America getting their businesses getting trashed and faces punched by "Antifascist" mobs if you offend them.

Your examples of the NYT "reporting" that "Trump is Hitler" are from op-eds and book reviews (i.e. not reporting) and don't contain any such claim anyway. Somebody here is indeed attempting to gaslight.

sorry, put in wrong branch

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"Somebody here is indeed attempting to gaslight."

I didn't think anybody on this site is literal enough to believe that "Trump is Hitler". I'm pretty sure everyone is aware that it's a metaphor to mean Trump is as bad as Hitler or that Trump's policies are as bad as Hitler's policies.

"and don't contain any such claim anyway. "

Yes, they do. The links I listed clearly link Trump and Trump's policy to Hitler's policies and fascism.

This editorial deliberately attempts to draw multiple parallels between Trump's policies and the rise of Nazism in Germany.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/24/opinion/trump-germany.html

You aren't arguing in good faith, but trying to nit pick the exact phrasing. You are attempting sophistry instead of addressing the core points of the argument.

The New York Times' has, on multiple occasions, posted articles that directly compare Trump's policies to Hitler's policies.

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- "reporting" that Trump is Hitler, Satan, and a Russian spy

I highly doubt that you've seen comparisons between Trump and Hitler/Satan on the likes of NYT/CNN/WaPo. Probably you have seen such from random people in your social media feeds and places like the comments on this blog.

As for the Russian spy thing - the fact that his campaign staff had several felonious employees who conducted nefarious meetings with Russian operatives, whilst the Russian government was carrying out espionage operations for the purpose of benefiting his campaign, would still be newsworthy even if Trump was totally innocent. You expect CNN etc. to just sweep that under the rug? What did they do with Benghazi?

"How does the rise of Hitler look since the election of Donald Trump? "

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/books/review/hitlers-first-hundred-days-peter-fritzsche.html

"Trump says he wants to protect law-abiding citizens. In 1933, Hitler issued his ‘Decree of the Reich President for the Protection of People and State.’"

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/24/opinion/trump-germany.html

"Protesters are being snatched from the streets without warrants. Can we call it fascism yet? ... On Friday, the House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, tweeted about what’s happening in Portland: “Trump and his storm troopers must be stopped.”"

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/20/opinion/portland-protests-trump.html

Those are just from the NYT's.....

" Probably you have seen such from random people in your social media feeds and places like the comments on this blog."

Do you feel slightly foolish now? Clearly you are ignoring what the New York Time's is writing and attempting to gaslight people into believing what they are reading doesn't actually exist.

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I'll add this from a CNN interview in August of last year:

"Dr. Allen Frances, the former chairman of the Psychiatry Department at Duke University, told CNN's "Reliable Sources" on Sunday that President Trump is as bad as the worst dictators in history and his presidency could end up causing more deaths than Hitler, Stalin, and Mao."

""Trump is as destructive a person in this century as Hitler, Stalin, Mao in the last century. He may be responsible for many more million deaths than they were.""

"CNN host Brian Stelter tweeted after receiving criticism about the segment that he should have questioned Dr. Frances about the statement but he was distracted by technical difficulties."

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2019/08/25/psychiatrist_on_cnn_trump_may_be_responsible_for_millions_more_deaths_than_hitler_stalin_and_mao_combined.html

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The echo chamber doesn't sound like an echo chamber if you love the sound of your own voice and agree with everything you hear. You can unplug anytime your like, but you'll likely never leave.

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we have seen the future
the future is robotic lawn mowers

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'My thought is that the fact that we consume contemporary media in isolation '

The world has been going downhill ever since we gave up reading poetry out loud in public.

Some where around 200 AD.

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A rare prior_approval +1. The age of video was corrupting relative to cinema, literature led to a cruder understanding of human character, not a deeper?

Considering literature, I could argue, media and art consumed individually can allow deeper engagement with psychological elements, and so construction of empathy.

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What is POTMR?

I would also like to know what POTMR means. Neither Google nor Bing knows.

Like GPT-3, it knows, you just have to know how to ask it. Well, it doesn't quite know, but I think it might be something like "previously on..." because the other posts with this label refer to previous work being proven correct, and there have been some previous posts here arguing that the median voter will be a problem for Democratic healthcare policy in the long term.

https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Amarginalrevolution.com+%22potmr%22

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22median+voter%22+medicare+site%3Amarginalrevolution.com

This did not help.

Nevermind. Made a mistake, can't delete the comment.

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President Of The Marginal Revolution

+1, I think this is the best answer.

Also, it's rude to not credit Hyperborealis who first posted this below.

It doesn't fit with the other post about Brexit though?

+1, that is true

Proof of the

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Party of the Marginal Revolution? It's a party platform after all.

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https://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2017/06/trump-collapse-americas-global-role-potmr.html

So, "previously on t? Marginal Revolution"?

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2. The Roman Republic and later Empire was integrated into the Indian Ocean trade network that stretched as far east as Java, so it's possible that fish sauce spread that way. But I'm more inclined to think it was an independent invention - both Roman and Southeast Asians independently figured out how to make a tasty sauce from fish. There's only so many ways to do so with then-existing technology, after all.

I agree. I think it's kind of a natural invention for anyone with the right kind of fish.

Were the Vietnamese the first to add sugar? When you dip eggrolls that's sweetened and diluted fish sauce. Bún thịt nướng, same.

Egg rolls are about as Asian as a McDonalds McRib.

Chả giò is about as Vietnamese as nước mắm pha.

True and irrelevant

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Kind of a dumb comment. Most readers will know Chả giò as egg rolls, but the fact that I call them out as served with sweetened fish sauce, and colloquially "vegetables" should have been the give-away.

They’re not egg rolls

I presume you have experience with many Asian things being mapped into English words. It's often a rude match, as with "Guava" below.

Better to treat it with humor imo, than to insist as you do now that Vietnamese restaurants have it all wrong with their menus.

Vietnamese restaurants in Taipei, being located in a high trust society, never, ever make mistakes on their menus.

Though possibly, they cannot be found on Formosa - maybe someone can provide some insight.

Thanks prior_approval. Seems like a nonsensical comment, but that's par for the course from you.

Egg rolls are egg rolls. They're an American food. Not surprising that a restaurant in America would serve them.

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Speaking of mapping Vietnamese into English, I really think they should have called the "Oi Xa li" tree a Vietnamese "Apple" an not a "Guava" because to me it tastes like a Granny Smith.

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Garum used a fair amount of fish entrails. And wouldn’t there be other versions of the condiment between the Mediterranean and Asia if this culinary migration happened? I’ve heard there are producers of Garum in Italy now.

Doesn't Worcester Sauce have its origins in garum...anchovies, molasses, vinegar

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Totally agreed that it was independent; there is not a single coastal people in the entire world that has not at some point preserved fish in salt. The idea that it couldn't occur independently to two people to refine and consume some of the resulting brine is preposterous.

I think a lot of complicated ideas probably spread via explorers. But fish sauce doesn't strike me as complicated. I would imagine it was "discovered" throughout the world.

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They're not even an independent innovation in SE Asia; there are Chinese precursors.

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The original concept of "sushi" was basically to pack fish, salt, and rice together to ferment, but don't *quite* let it turn into sauce. Yeah...it's a pretty common move, and no reason to think the Romans had to teach Asia how to leave things out in the sun for a while.

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4. As provided as a service by the tech industry.

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#4: Depends on your definition of "hedonism". And what sorts of things make you happy. Epicurus would say that it does, but his thoughts on what make us the happiest aren't what we'd expect.

Somewhat related is Ayn Rand's The Virtue of Selfishness. But only for certain kinds of Selfishness.

Because odds are, the sort of hedonism found at Hedo II will be blocked by many Internet filters.

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Objectivism will make you "happy". "Happiness", apparently, does not make you "happy" anymore. Hedonism will only make you happy if you have been deprived of pleasure. And after a while, pleasure becomes trivial without pain. And then it all goes down-hegel from there.

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1. Compared to the modern age, 1940s-1980s were an information starved period. More people did "long reads" of their newspaper out of boredom. Broadcast media of the day didn't really change that equation, and producers could expect viewers to stick with news shows for the same reason. (An "information search" usually involved a drive to the library.)

The internet brought what might be a bifurcation. On the one hand information searches and deep reads are easier than ever, but it's also possible to be a fully active, never bored, shallow reader as well.

I think the decline of long reading is part 1 of a problem, but part 2 is that surface readers have the ability to publish, find each other, and drive the national conversation like never before.

What will happen next? Well, Facebook took down a rapid/shallow message from the President of the United States this morning.

They weren't wrong. Maybe it's not perfect, but any information system needs filters to be of value.

Maybe we tried everyone wading through the effluent of Sturgeon's law and it didn't work.

Anyone who was a child before perhaps 1995 probably remembers a parent with a cup of coffee and a newspaper. Quietly reading.

I don't miss it exactly, but I kind of miss the discipline it imposed on the day. You got a precisely measured dose: some news, not too much, not at all hyperventilating; one or two pages of opinion, much of it unsigned and thus rather unflashy and workmanlike as well as, oddly given the coruscating fights people get into opining nowadays, a handful of boring letters to the editor, written like short school reports, generally by the same people for years on end (the New Yorker's aggressively anodyne letters section is a throwback to this); then sports, your lifestyle or on alternate days entertainment page, comics or jumble for those who liked them. If it was a small town, you'd leave the slender pages on the coffee table and invariably pick it up again later to see if there was anything more to squeeze out if it. I remember my grandmother-in-law so doing, and sighing: "I can't stand all this 'eyeing'." (? - she meant the paper's preferred trope, used almost daily: City eyeing underpass, Israel eyeing peace agreement,etc.)

One thing was almost totally absent in my recollection: the incestuous writing about what others wrote, or said on TV, the day or week before. They just wrote mainly about things that happened out in the world. I sometimes wonder if via the internet we're going to read and write ourselves out of the latter.

A lot of people don't realize that there has been no authentic original news content since 1999.

It's all cranked out by AI now. Then endlessly regurgitated and repackaged.

Not unlike a modern radio station robot playlist.

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The biggest change has been the immediacy of news. Reporters generally reported only the facts of a new story. Editorials or opinion pieces didn't contaminate the "news" as much and often waited till the facts were in before expressing an opinion. Granted, my memory only goes back 40 years to the 1980's. But certainly at that time the News was a little slower, a little less partisan and more thoughtful.

Just look at the Nick Sandmann slander/libel situation. The basic facts were reasonably well known within 24 hours. But "reporters" wrote highly biased stories the next morning, and in several cases ignored contradictory reports. They rushed out stories that were incorrect and incomplete and were as much editorials as News.

The result CNN and the Washington Post have both reached settlements in multi-million dollar law suits.

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I think there were more local idiosyncrasies in those days. The "eyeing" in your example.

Up until the 1970s my city's main newspaper liked to use "Solons" in its headlines as a shorthand way of saying "legislators" or "congressmen", although IIRC they used the term only for the state legislators, not federal. Nowadays, how many people even know what "Solons" means or for that matter who Solon was?

Also in the 1970s, at one point I arrived in St. Louis, MO and looked at the headlines for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which said that the local "drouth" was continuing.

Solons: I love that.

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#6. Why has the Spanish response to coronavirus been so poor?

... main takeaway from the article is that we all should be very cautious accepting any government/official Covid-19 statistics at face value.

Data gathering margins of error and faulty bureaucratic reporting processes are very substantial everywhere {even in U.S.}

Spain was hit hard by Covid-19 and its severe social-distancing mandates did not appear to work as intended.

Cowen is relaying the tone of the article when he writes: "Why has the Spanish response to coronavirus been so poor"? but both are assuming we can possibly know anything about the response with so many factors at this point.

Why has Japan's "performance" been so exemplary with only 1,000 Covid-19 deaths? Was it because they were among the lowest testers in the world? Was it because they declared a national emergency when the increase in cases had flattened and was coming down three days earlier? Was it because they didn't quarantine those on the cruise ship who tested positive?

The Norwegian government said it erred in locking down since the outcome with Swedish style social distancing was the same. Why have Vietnam and Laos been so successful having no deaths? Do a lot of their health officials have policy degrees from the Kennedy School? Probably crucial....

"The Norwegian government said it erred in locking down since the outcome with Swedish style social distancing was the same. "

Can you give a source for that.

The Norwegian government is mighty proud that their deaths per million is 10% that of Sweden, something like 60 per million rather than 600 per million.

I am personally for the Sweden approach, and I think Norway may effectively sit on a fused bomb, that they have just delayed the final inevitable result.

Post as much information as possible about how the Swedes are being looked at by their Nordic neighbors (like blocking their borders to Swedes after opening up to other EU countries), and it will make zero difference.

This is not a comment on the Swedish per se, simply on how the Danes are very satisfied to be looking at significantly fewer deaths and higher projected economic growth than their Swedish neighbors. We will know more in a year.

We actually know some right now:

"Camille Stoltenberg, head of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH), says that analysis suggests less restrictive measures would have been sufficient - and has urged the authorities to avoid taking such a heavy-handed approach in the event of a second wave of infections."

https://www.theweek.co.uk/107093/norweigian-health-chief-coronavirus-no-lockdown-sweden

Stoltenberg: "Our assessment now, and I find that there is a broad consensus in relation to the reopening, was that one could probably achieve the same effect – and avoid part of the unfortunate repercussions – by not closing. But, instead, staying open with precautions to stop the spread."

Originally in The Spectator:
https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/covid-19-update-lockdown-was-not-needed-to-tame-covid-says-norway

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Stop with the lies.
Forecasts are hypothetical and are mixed on whether Denmark or Sweden will grow faster. But the confirmed result is that the Swedish economy actually grew in the first quarter, Denmark's did not. Also the borders are open or opening.

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https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/norway-health-chief-lockdown-was-not-needed-to-tame-covid

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POTMR? Party of the marginal revolution? Couldn't find anything on google.

Patiently Optimistic Thiago May Retire

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An Indian neighbor and his wife became friends and I asked how they met. Ah, I said, you corresponded on a dating website. No, he politely corrected, on a *matrimonial* website. Indians, there's a reason they'll be here when we're gone! I thank you for the link, T.C. I have gotten to this point without watching so much as a single episode of reality TV, unless you count the Great British Bake-off, but this one sounds diverting, at least to dip into at supper time. At any rate a change of pace from Every Night Noir or M*A*S*H reruns or the youth prodigies of Performance Today.

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#1 conflates two unrelated phenomena. People have been using demonization and similar tactics long before the advent of social media, and social media contains like/comment features specifically for the purpose of alerting the user to what others are attending.

We see the tactics we see in social (and legacy) media today because those who control them are losing that control.

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3. “Note that foreign exoticization, and thus partial concealment of anti-PC attitudes ...... and maybe they won’t care very much.” And they don’t.“
I’d dismiss this as pseudo intellectual bullshit If I understood what he’s saying. Judith Butler level abstruseness.

I read it about five times and still have no idea what he meant

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President Of The Marginal Revolution.

Tyler is pointing out that Biden will make incremental changes, and not a single fell-swoop change to M4A.

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today in pangolin history
Attorney General Barr explained a trained marxist scam

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DNC represents the Median voter? They also struck down Marijuana legalization at the federal level. This is not even palatable in Northern Virginia, coastal enclaves, and flyover metros that the DNC supposedly caters toward. Sounds like Grandpa Joe's boomer malarkey. I'll take Obama any day.

Joe Rogan is more representative of the Median voter.

Grandpa Joe Biden is too old to be a boomer.

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#7. Almost there... But, I can't tell if the possibility of recombination in a human host isn't addressed because everyone with expertise knows that it is impossible, or just because it hasn't been considered.

@anonymous- are you aware that Shi Zhengli's 2015 NIH paper on the chimeric SARS-COV virus she built discussing recombination in a human host? It was rather surprising to see it there, and I thought of you. Read it and see for yourself.

As for this Tweet, it's much ado about nothing. Of course SARS-CoV has been circulating for decades, but the issue is why SARS-COV-2 has such a huge gain of function (when most natural viruses lose functionality not gain it) and why in terms of DNA drift it's a once in a generation or two (25-50 years) virus. Maybe because it's made in a lab?

More importantly, did the creator of SARS-CoV2 file a patent?

@clamence- yes, de facto. Recall from the IP courses you never took that contrary to layperson belief there's no such thing yet as a "world patent". But comedians enforce patent rights informally among themselves (stealing another's joke will get you ostracized). So how did Shi Zhengli enforce her de facto patent? Easy. Recall when the whole world around March or so was frantically trying to obtain the DNA sequences for SARS-CoV-2, her lab was the first to publish it. She's telling the world (informally) that this is her virus, she's proud of it, gaining world respect for her lab. IP. Trademark more than patent but IP. Never forget IP clamence. Despite what academics tell you, in the real world it's important, along with political lobbying, rent seeking, quasi or actual monopolies. The drive for profits, more than humanitarian glory, is what drives an economy. Greed is good. Greed clarifies, cuts through...I should memorize that speech.

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It's not impossible just easier to get these kind of natural multi virus events/recombinations in animal hosts like bats than in humans . Why ? bats harbor a large number of active Coronaviruses ( they're not affected). A 2017 paper listed 32 alpha-CoVs and 41 beta-CoVs that were identified in bats sampled from China. SARSr-CoVs have been detected in at least 11 different species of horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus)
They roost in huge numbers and in close quarters with droppings everywhere and some bat species travel quite a lot and even roost near other bats species, and so they have a high contact rate.
In addition if a new recombination occur that's virulent to humans , it can stay undetected for a while in bats, until they're sampled for it, and generally bats are much undersampled for disease, so perhaps for a long time we have no idea it's there.
In humans it's much less likely not to be detected.
The paper suggests to go out there in the field and look for SARs-Cov-2 in horseshoe bats along the gradient from Yunnan to Hubei.

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5. Just remember kiddies, the DNC is composed of Maoists and radical left wingers. Completely overtaken by Bernie Bros. That's going to be important to remember in November.

No, Speaker Pelosi and her husband didn't make a couple of hundred million dollars since she's been in Congress because she's a Maoist. People often proclaim that she's some kind of Red Communist. Whereas she's really just a partisan interested in power and money.

Yes, Pelosi and husband like power and money but their problem is first to keep both and then to gain more power and money. Indeed, at least for the past 5 years, their mendacity and hypocrisy are well above the average level of American politicians and have been critical to gain power and money. So, the question is how to gain more power and money when you have to form a coalition with radical leftists to have a fair chance of winning or stealing the election. At some point, they had to give up or to trust the radical leftists, and they decided to trust them. It's too late to change strategy and thus why we are observing the pathetic response of all Dem leadership to the radical leftists' strategy of extorting America to accept their ideas or to get canceled.

I hope this new Unidad Popular (a la Chilena, I'm not Chilean but I live in Chile) win the election because I can bet you they will kill themselves. If they don't do that, then we should look at what is going on in Spain where the coalition PSOE-Podemos is governing (post-Franco Spain became "rich" thanks to EU, but still the main difference between Spain and the U.S. is that Spain is a tourist country and little else, what implies that because of the heavy economic cost of the coalition's poor response to the pandemic the government has to accept the terms imposed by EU to funding public spending). Today the opposition to the coalition is fragmented but they will reach an agreement in 2 or 3 years after the old factions find how to accommodate the new ones and become an electoral majority. In the U.S., however, if Crazy coalition wins in November, it will take no more than 2 years for the opposition to form a "contra-revolutionary" coalition to win Congress in 2022.

"if Crazy coalition wins in November, it will take no more than 2 years for the opposition to form a "contra-revolutionary" coalition to win Congress in 2022."

That's pretty typical in Congress. The House of Representative swings quickly.

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A few concepts when watching any reality show:

1. It may not be scripted but it is produced. Watched for change in camera angles in the middle of scene. Does anyone think that a low end production company sends multiple crews to a shoot.

2 Reality shows are made or fail based upon the editing. The real talent of these shows is taking many hours of footage of average people and editing it down to 48 minutes or so of interesting storylines.

3. It helps to think of reality TV much like professional wrestling. Someone is always going to get the heel edit and someone else is going to get the babyface edit. There are also many works going on during filming.

Reality shows have become prevalent because of costs. The Actors guild and the writers guild have priced themselves out of the market. You don't have to pay either one of those guilds to produce a "reality" show and you don't have to pay them royalties afterwards either.

It is my understanding that reality "actors" will work for the booze and buffet spreads, plus the opportunity to leverage their newfound celebrity and move to the top of the list for choosing shifts at Applebees.

The people who have to come back in the second season are the ones who can and do make money off of the shoes. Think about the cast of Jersey Shore on MTV.

The downside for the TV networks is that there is very little value in syndication/streaming/reruns of reality shows.

Reality shows are really just ESPN for women where there is a story arc for a season, they can discuss the wins and losses and there are pre-game and post-game analysis.

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#2 all food worth eating starts in Italy. (Winky)

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Far too often I read a South Asian female writer who criticizes colorism among the group, but who I discover -- if they married outside of the culture -- chose to marry a White guy. Not anecdote. I am sure there are exceptions in which one chose to marry Black, but that would be the exception to the rule.

Always watch what people do, not what they say.

The parsimonious explanation here is that these women are AWFLs despite being brown, and AWFLs marry white men eventually.

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And they always disclose it for 2 reasons: 1) (In the text of the article) because it is easier to do it there rather than a disclosure at the bottom: "The writer has investments in this stock". and 2) Always good to get ahead of the jury that the accused is a bad, bad man, but he did not commit the murder.

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I have always considred the Desi as being some of the worst bigots in the U.S. even thought they are on the left politically. They are generally racist, sexist, and classist. They believe that they should be the order givers and that everyone else should obey.

Well, it's MR I guess. There had to be a more racist comment than repeatedly insisting Egg Rolls are authentic Asian food and then doubling down on ignorance.

Is it more or less racist than proclaiming Steve Sailer invented Black identity and culture?

Inquiring minds

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1) So if I spend all day reading Rayward and Mulp comments, I'm more likely to become a nazi? Plausible.

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https://hotair.com/headlines/archives/2020/07/study-coronavirus-may-inflict-damage-heart-attacks/

One German study found that 78 percent of patients who recovered from COVID-19 were left with structural changes to their heart, and 76 of the 100 survivors showed signs of the kind of damage a heart attack leaves.

A second study, also conducted in Germany, found that more than half of people who died after contracting COVID-19 had high levels of the virus in their hearts.

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Egad!

Possibly conflating causation now. Were these high risk, elderly patients with pre-existing conditions?

Are these reports of the post mortem diagnosis of classified COVID positives that could have died from another condition which inflate CV19 deaths?

There was a reddit thread about this story. It was a broad group of patients, but the informed commentors seemed to believe that the inflammation detected was a necessarily a sign of actual heart damage. But follow up studies need to look into the possibility.

https://www.reddit.com/r/China_Flu/comments/hzhbgh/78_of_covid19_patients_show_signs_of_heart_damage/

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Regarding the fish sauce story, it is my understanding that the Dutch took this fish sauce back west through South Africa, where it became the ancestor of catsup, from where it got to Britain and eventually to the US, where the fish sauce part got replaced by tomato sauce to give us our all-American modern ketchup.

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Putting on shorts and lying in a hammock in summer, reading Jane Austen, is not what most people think of when they think of hedonism.

Hugh Hefner is what most people think about when they think of hedonism.

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the thing about 'art deco', is you know it when you see it, imitations sputter limp out of the gate

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq90Gg-9iF4&list=OLAK5uy_l17o9qWXD4hI6GG4zpS-tJSrW3YRAbAN0&index=12

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that girl can sing, and you are getting a lesson children

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should be a comma in there somewhere

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rocking, on a tuesday nite!

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gorgeous song

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1. For a lot of people, this blog is a discussion. You get used to the people you disagree with, none of whom are ideologues. Often, if they make a good point, you let it go, even if you disagree. They're trying. Then there are people, well, bigots and imbeciles, who never really discuss or even argue, but proclaim. Many of them can't seem to let anything go, because they're ideologues. They have to have the last word, their heads exploding because someone doesn't agree with them. They add nothing. They have nothing to offer. What some of want us are forums for discussion, as opposed to wanting to gaze at the glory of our own comments being posted, an onanistic practice. Always prefer the forums for discussion, and avoid the people seeking some kind of release from publicly stating their views, most often without wanting attribution, since they know who they are, which is the only point in them joining the forum. Make sure to wash your hands when coming across them.

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6. The ports are international ports also, especially Barcelona.

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the grant mungers, go suk on it

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soaring voice, good presentation of the whirwinds/tempests we face ...

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we'll get thru this sht

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play it again sam

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hear a woman sing like that? you are in the presence of angels

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u lil piece of s, nobody f heads

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woo, woo, woo

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a woman sings like that? u listen

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq90Gg-9iF4&list=OLAK5uy_l17o9qWXD4hI6GG4zpS-tJSrW3YRAbAN0&index=12m

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booby doo be doo

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq90Gg-9iF4&list=OLAK5uy_l17o9qWXD4hI6GG4zpS-tJSrW3YRAbAN0&index=12

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq90Gg-9iF4&list=OLAK5uy_l17o9qWXD4hI6GG4zpS-tJSrW3YRAbAN0&index=12

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nice ballad music, nice tempo

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blank, please stop it. It's not funny or clever.

roger

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Some people are just bug nuts crazy.

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wouldn't be playing it here, in this venue, if i didn't think it had
some carry

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just lights out, love, masterpiece

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What does POTMR stand for? Thanks.

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Adolph Hitler's policies were popular with large segments of the German population. Wanting to avoid communism, wanting to annex or colonize land that was not being used to its potential, wanting everyone to do "the right things" with "moral clarity," and other policies were not particularly or exclusively Hitler's. Anti-Semitism was not specific to Hitler (it exists in the USA). The Final Solution was to remove Jew from Germany but events prevented that so the remaining option was to cancel them, unfortunately for Jews (Zionists and internationalists did little to help them, other than cheap talk, as a historical fact). He made a number of unwise military decisions, and it can be argued, went too far with the Final Solution (but then, he was acting with "moral clarity").
Wanting to secure the national borders is not the same as shoving people into ovens.
I was not especially a Trump fan until recently. I viewed him as just another obnoxious guy from New York (neither a clown nor a sociopath, just obnoxious and narcissistic, rather like a lot of Americans and most New Yorkers). But compared to anyone from the Antifa/BLM crowd, or the pusillanimous pussies who cower in fear of them and are shockingly easy to manipulate by media, Trump looks very good. Very good indeed. I would be a casting a ballot for Trump if I were an American voter.

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By June 1 the daily deaths/population was below the Europe average

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Anybody tracking this?

https://medium.com/@yurideigin/lab-made-cov2-genealogy-through-the-lens-of-gain-of-function-research-f96dd7413748

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