Who Doesn’t Want You to be a Millionaire?

In Russia, the ‘Ask the Audience’ lifeline isn’t one that the contestant would often use because the audience often gives wrong answers intentionally to trick the contestants.

From Fact-Index.

Comments

You made a typo in link, remove last "."

How do they coordinate their strategies well enough for this to work?

Hmmm. You don't use because it when you do the audience gives wrong answers to trick you. But if they systematically avoid the right answer there's information to be exploited. But if you are known to exploit it.....

Then they should all answer randomly. However, that assumes that everyone in the audience is spiteful, which is unlikely. The "griefers" would add noise but the honest answer would still be more likely. Rational griefers should weight their choices against the correct answer in proportion to the number of honest people.

In the more likely event that your fellow griefers simply try to pick wrong answers, you should pick your answer based on what you think the proportion of griefers is, and what you think the contestant thinks the proportion is. If griefers are common and the contestant thinks this, pick what you think is correct, invert either of those and pick what you think is incorrect.

You could go even further based on the systematic bias of both griefers and honest people, but that seems unnecessarily complex for something with relatively little consequence.

Looking at this critically, it appears to be a case of "the seen and the unseen". It's similar to what Steven Landsburg describes in an article on Experimental Economics: apparently, some people would like to transfer money from the contestant to the game show producers. Their spite at seeing one person get rich may be making already rich people even richer. Though that's not quite right, since the show's viewership (and advertising revenue) depend on how well people do. However, I assume that viewership is positively correlated with winnings up to a fairly high point (millionaires every week would eventually get boring, but several times higher than expected wouldn't). This would imply that viewers like it when people win. Thus, when you make a contestant worse off, you're likely making viewers (who are overwhelmingly non-rich) worse off, too.

"Fact-Index"? Is Alex deliberately tricking his audience?

Boris and Ivan were both Russian peasants, but Boris was richer, because he owned a cow, which lifted him up from the grinding misery in which most peasants lived. Ivan, meanwhile, was trapped in hopeless poverty. One day, an angel appeared to Ivan, and said, "I am your guardian angel, here to do whatever it will take to make your life all you wish for." Ivan replied, "Wonderful! You're going to kill Boris's cow?!"

The Russian philopher Maxim Gorky wrote, "One miserable being seeks another miserable being; then he's happy."

"Kill my neighbor's cow!"

The wrong answer should be halfway random, wisdom of crowds and all. With a honest audience (meaning every country expect Russia, Russia is just a sucky place, thats what happens with libertarians in charge, people are worse off than during communism, quite an art), the audience question is great for harder questions, so why waste it on an easy early question?

In Russia audience asks you.

Hmmm. You don't use because it when you do the audience gives wrong answers to trick you. But if they systematically avoid the right answer there's information to be exploited. But if you are known to exploit it.....

International collectors quickly came to love the shoe and eventually Nike Shox became popular in the whole world as well.

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