China Grave Bubble

I cannot afford to buy a house while I’m alive and now cannot afford to buy a grave for when I’m dead.

The soaring price of land in China is spreading to burial plots which now can cost more per square foot than luxury homes. And here:

Some Chinese call themselves fen nu (grave slaves), derived from fang nu (housing slaves) – those burdened with huge housing mortgages.

Hat tip: Helen Yang.

Comments

The solution is to double up: put one dead body into an ancestors existing grave.

That way, at your death, you can move in with your great, great, great, great grandfather.

Good idea to keep close with family. Another thing is that, in China, the ownership for a house is limited to 70 years. After spending a bundle of money for the house, you need to turn it back to the government 70 years later. I am wondering the law for grave, should I also turn it back? hemmmm ...

That's one way the speculators handle this: They buy hundreds of plots under the name of a big family and expect to resell the plots to individuals at a higher price in the future.

simply due to supply and demand...has nothing to do with the creation of trillions of new FRNs.

Related "Rest in Fleece: Woolen Coffins Offer Green Goodbye"
Read more: http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2056346,00.html#ixzz1IleuX5JW"

According to ridleys the Rational optimist people used to spend more on funerals than on medical care.

I remember whole body burial had been outlawed since 2000 in most area of China due to lack of land. All deaths are supposed to be cremated. Many cemeteries would let you buy a site before 2000, so you can save the spot. (My grandma died in 2003, we bought a spot in the 90s, still have to pay bribes get her in the ground.)

According to Feng Shui, a good burial benefits the family for generations. (People blame all their misfortunes on their ancestors' burial site.) Sites are often very carefully selected. Much more work than buying a house.Things always get crazy when it involves invisible forces.

Some people who bought a site before 2000 are not dead yet and they are putting the land on the market. It's hot commodity.

It is also very popular to trade grave sites in Chinese Canadian community. Some people would go so far as to dig up their entire family grave in China (I'm talking 3-4 generations with like 20 bodies!) and relocate them in Toronto. Chinese would pay anything for good feng shui.

That may be an older generation/expatriate thing. Most of my mainland Chinese co-workers in grad school will readily dismiss such beliefs as "feudal superstition".

"Some people would go so far as to dig up their entire family grave in China (I’m talking 3-4 generations with like 20 bodies!) and relocate them in Toronto. Chinese would pay anything for good feng shui."

Surely, you are not serious?! Does Canada give visa to dead people? Or are they brought in under some kind of import license?

@adora: "Some people would go so far as to dig up their entire family grave in China (I’m talking 3-4 generations with like 20 bodies!) and relocate them in Toronto. Chinese would pay anything for good feng shui."

Surely, you are not serious, right?!
Does Canada have visa for dead people? Or are they brought in under some import-license??

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