Don’t lose sleep over this one

A one-hour increase in location-average weekly sleep increases wages by 1.3% in the short run and by 5% in the long run.

Here is the paper, by Matthew Gibson and Jeffrey Shrader (pdf).  Schrader, from UCSD, is on the job market this year.  His job market paper is on expectations and adaptation to environmental risks (pdf).

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Too much sleep is associated with higher all-cause mortality.

http://www.journalsleep.org/viewabstract.aspx?pid=27780

So is too little

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/researchers_say_lack/

Which direction is the causation?

Exactly!

Yeah, this reminds me of the whole "Germans are more productive because they work less" meme.

Which, oddly, is true - at least if the people actually running German companies are to be believed, since the several I know are major believers in the idea that weeks of vacation time is the sort of thing that keeps a skilled work force productive. But then, Germany is a socialist hell hole.

The people running German companies are bald-faced liars though, as proven recently.

"...increases wages by 1.3%..."

Impressive -- they confidently measure the alleged sleep/wage effect to one-tenth-percent accuracy (?)

Hubris/Fantasy effect in play

Headline: "Selfish one percentagers monopolize sleep, gain in income."

In the long run, we're all asleep.

But some of us are asleep at the wheel.

And others are asleepercells.

Jan, nice riff on Keynes, but he did not have a sufficient education to reasonably argue, pro or contra, whether we all were around somewhere for a long time before we were born, or to reasonably argue whether we are here mainly, mostly, or just simply maybe for the purpose of getting ready for a better after-life, built on this one. His brother may have had a sufficient education for that debate, but J.M. absolutely did not,

Re: Correlation between sleeping and wages

Does sleeping on the job count?

Does "job market" in this context mean "bid to stay in school"?

So, if I extrapolate to 24 hours of sleep, I will be rich.

not unless you already are. you'll less than double your wages in the long run.

Future generations are going to look at our cavalier attitude towards sleep deprivation the same way we look at the smoking culture of the 1950s. Our society not only tolerates widespread sleep deprivation but celebrates it. Donald Trump supporters brag about how he only sleeps 3 hours a night, whereas Hillary takes too many naps. In particular our society has no understanding for people's genetically varying circadian rhythms.

Night owls are automatically assumed to be lazy disorganized libertines, who need to be forced to just wake up early. People (justly) point to high suicide rates among transgendered people as a symptom of injustice and discrimination. But people with DSPS (extreme night owls) have similarly elevated suicide rates. Perhaps the most widespread cruelty is subjecting millions of adolescents, the latest-rising demographic, to some of the earliest hours of any major institutions. This type of state-mandated chronic sleep deprivation is often even celebrated. We're told that making teenagers wake up only a few hours after they naturally fall asleep is somehow character building. Yet the evidence is clear that this has long-term devastating consequences on Alzheimers rates and general age-related cognitive decline. In addition the sizable majority of adolescent's elevated delinquency and social pathologies seem to stem from their chronic sleep deprivation.

Can you cite any evidence for a link between sleep deprivation and Alzheimer's? I'm very familiar with Alzheimer's hypotheses, but that's a new one to me.

Disturbed sleep is common in moderate/severe Alzheimer's, called "sundowning", but that's a consequence not a cause because it occurs late in the disease. Also, at least one study finds sundowners get as much sleep as anybody else. Letting them take naps during the day may be the cause of sundowning.

Sure. Basically what modern research reveals is the existence of a waste-removal system in the brain, called the glymphatic system. It's only really active during sleep. Toxins that are normally cleared by this system during sleep are some of the prime culprits of cumulative neurological damage leading to Alzheimers, Parkinsons and age-related cognitive decline.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/01/04/460620606/lack-of-deep-sleep-may-set-the-stage-for-alzheimers
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glymphatic_system

I see. Just an NPR article. No study showing lack of sleep being associated with onset of Alzheimer's. Nothing a scientist would consider evidence. It's just BS, on the same order of the notions that wheat gluten or copper water pipes cause Alzheimer's.

Did you look at the article? It seems to cite the research.

No, they didn't. The OHSU guys were talking about a study they might do but hadn't done yet. A rodent study was mentioned, but rodents don't get Alzheimer's. So what I said stands -- there's NO evidence that lack of sleep causes Alzheimer's. It's speculation on the order of the notions that wheat gluten or copper water pipes cause Alzheimer's. It's just BS like everything else in your original post. You don't know how to differentiate between scientific evidence and something in the popular media. God help you if you start reading The Daily Mail.

My error, I was responding to Greg, but it was Doug's post which is full of BS.

"We’re told that making teenagers wake up only a few hours after they naturally fall asleep is somehow character building."

Hmmm "only a few hours", which in my experience can mean 9, may not be the most effective phrasing.

Joking aside, I can anecdotally confirm that sleep research is indeed making strides.

Good post there. Sleep deprivation is moronic and that should be obvious to anybody. Its a testament to people's stupidity that people become sleep deprived so easily.

study, study, 4 the next test

lil amoeba f o faces . . .

Does this have implications for the wage gap between men and women?

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