Who’s complacent?

A strata on Vancouver Island is experiencing a backlash after passing a bylaw last week banning outdoor play — a rule that is not unusual but goes further than most, according to the Condominium Home Owners’ Association of B.C.

In B.C., ownership in condominiums, apartments or townhouses sharing common areas is often purchased through an owners’ corporation under a strata title. The owners elect a council that sets policy for the strata.

Artisan Gardens, a neighbourhood development in Chemainus, about 80 kilometres north of Victoria, voted 15-4 in favour of adopting a bylaw that prohibits using the roadway “for play, including hockey, baseball, basketball, skateboarding, chalk artistry, bicycling or other sports and recreational activities.”

Here is the full story, via Michelle Dawson.

Comments

Clearly someone is thinking of the children.

And adapting Conan's idea of what is best in life to present circumstances - 'To crush their children. See them driven before you into their dwelling places. And to hear the lamentations of their parents.'

This is white supremacy at its best.

Respond

Add Comment

Isn't the idea to NOT hear the lamentations of the children?

Which is why the children are driven to their dwelling places. Those running the strata (a name which sounds so deliciously sinister somehow) clearly enjoy the prospect of listening to the lamentations of the parents.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

That quote is a riff off Genghis Khan. I very much admire a man who actively cucks millions of other men. Me and the wifey approves.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

The bylaw barring copulation for reproductive purposes was quite controversial

I'm a CUCK

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Vancouver Island is one of the most beautiful places I have been. Due to its location on the coast, it's not as cold as one might expect. And it's very British. And Victoria has to be the most enchanting small city I have visited, from the capitol building (Victoria is the capital of British Columbia, not Vancouver) to the stately Empress Hotel to the gardens in the cottages that make Victoria such a special place. It's been many years, but I did drive north of Victoria. There wasn't much up there. As for ridiculous rules imposed by HOAs, none can top the rules of HOAs in Florida. Now we know why seniors support Trump.

And Bucharts Gardens is lovely.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Chemainus. Used to be a sawmill town. Obviously the working class town has been changed to a high end retirement destination.

Sometimes there seems to be a cosmic order to all this. Vancouver Island tilted 18 feet or so last major earthquake a couple centuries ago and is due for a big one. Maybe this is something like the Douglas Adams spaceship specially set aside for specific occupations.

Some problems go away all by themselves.

Respond

Add Comment

"Banning playing in the street" and "banning outdoor play" aren't quite synonyms.

Does the strata have park/playground areas?

(Maps don't show an "Artisan Gardens" in Chemainus, but there's a "Chemainus Gardens" on the road it's supposed to be on ... containing lots of non-road common/park areas, and Chemainus itself is pretty rural.

So I can't make myself atwitter about it.)

Am I playing when I bike to stores in the street? Are kids playing if they bike in the streets to school?

This seems to be the rise of a "streets are for cars only, and everyone must be moved by car, no matter what, even to go a block or two".

Respond

Add Comment

Yup, more information is required before we go atwitter. (It now occurs to me that maybe that's why the founders of the company called it Twitter in the first place.)

The article says 'a bylaw that prohibits using the roadway "for play, including hockey, baseball, basketball, skateboarding, chalk artistry, bicycling or other sports and recreational activities."'

Not playing in the street is a common-sense safety rule in a lot of places! Admittedly, in most hoity-toity neighborhoods with powerful homeowners' associations traffic is both light and slow, so playing in the street isn't as risky as it is in other neighborhoods. But those are also the neighborhoods where parents are likely to tell their children not to play in the street anyway, and to join the local youth hockey club or soccer league instead.

But at any rate, the article is so lazily written as to constitute fake news: the neighborhood did not "ban outdoor play".

It's also interesting that they're called strata in Canada. Did the name come from them being dominated by people from a certain social stratum, or from the way they regulate their street i.e. strada?

Strata title is a form of ownership devised for multi-level apartment blocks and horizontal subdivisions with shared areas. The 'strata' part of the term refers to apartments being on different levels, or "strata".

Strata title was first introduced in 1961 in the state of New South Wales, Australia, via Lend Lease, to better cope with the legal ownership of apartment blocks. Previously, the only adequate method of dividing ownership was company title, which had a number of defects, such as the difficulty of instituting mortgages. This term also applies to house-type strata title units in Australia.

Strata Title Schemes are composed of individual lots and common property. Lots are either apartments, garages or storerooms and each is shown on the title as being owned by a Lot Owner. Common Property is defined as everything else on the parcel of land that is not comprised in a Lot, such as common stairwells, driveways, roofs, gardens, etc.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strata_title

"Banning playing in the street" and "banning outdoor play" aren't quite synonyms.

In a built up suburb? Yeah, yeah they are.

Respond

Add Comment

"Not playing in the street is a common-sense safety rule in a lot of places!"

No its not. Its a rule made up by old people who hate children and the thought that they might suffer some mild inconvenience when they have to wait 30 seconds for the kids to move to the side of the street to let a car pass through. These kids aren't playing in the middle of a highway.

Cars aren't running though at 40 miles an hour with the driver asleep. To say this is 'common sense' would be to ignore the millions of children who have safely played in their neighborhood streets for a couple a three generations now.

Not sure where you live or what the suburb from the article is like, but there are many places where there’s no need for children to play in the street. They play in their yards, neighbor’s yards, or at the park down the block. Where I grew up (a first ring suburb of minneapolis/st Paul) the only thing we really did in the street was play catch with a football. If we actually wanted to play football we walked a block to grass lot. Or a block and a half to the baseball field. If we wanted to play catch with a baseball we played on the sidewalk. Tag we played in our yards and all the neighbors yards. There were 4 different neighbors who had basketball hoops in their yards or driveways. Street hockey was best played in the basketball court at the local playground 2 blocks away (which we never even used for basketball). The only real reason to ever play in the street was out of laziness not to walk 2 blocks.

I understand there are many places where there aren’t so many good places for children to play. I don’t know, but my guess is that 80 miles north of Victoria isn’t one of them.

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

It would be simpler to go further and have a no-kids policy. And I don't see why that shouldn't be allowed. There are retirement communities which ban families with kids and mandate minimum ages, so there should be "childless adult" complexes for DINKs and singles who want an adult not-family-friendly environment.

Although it does seem ironic to have a complex named "artisan gardens" banning chalk artistry.

Age-restricted strata are allowed and are actually pretty common. I live in BC.

Thank you for speaking English. Strata is a plural, like data. You are the only poster (including TMC) who got this right.

Well, I suppose you can say that Tyler didn't get it right, given that he didn't write it at all, in the same way you can accurately write that Jesus and Trump and Copernicus didn't get it right

Respond

Add Comment

Meh. You didn't read my comment where I used both the plural and singular forms: "It's also interesting that they're called strata in Canada. Did the name come from them being dominated by people from a certain social stratum, or from the way they regulate their street i.e. strada?"

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment

Alternative framing......"The benefits of private property: people live as they please."

Respond

Add Comment

My brother and sister in law, live in an apartment/condo complex in Annandale, the middle of which is a very nice green space, one of the rules for the green space is 'No vigorous ball play', despite many children living in the complex.

I get the impression that generally anti-child bylaws aren't actually that uncommon

Respond

Add Comment

Respond

Add Comment