Smell markets in everything

Previously, she has made dairy products from the perspiration of Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg.

Here is the full article.  And:

In one exhibition, [Sissel] Tolaas captured the armpit sweat of severely anxious men from Greenland to China, recreated their individual smells and painted them onto the walls of the installation. (“There was a composite odor of anxiety that just infused the whole room, and it was really unhinging,” said Howes, who saw it in Basel, Switzerland). After the smell of fear, Tolaas recreated the smell of violence from cage fighters in East London. She has recreated the scents of Berlin’s famed Berghain nightclub, New York’s Central Park in October, World War I, communism and the ocean. Her shows are immersive and emotional in a distracted world. They aim to grip audiences right by the lizard brain.

And:

Tolaas also invented 1,500 “smell memory kits” — abstract odors that have never been smelled before. When you want to remember an event, you open the amulet and inhale, sealing the moment in your emotional core. For the London Olympics, she made a Limburger cheese sourced from David Beckham’s sweaty socks, which was served to VIPs.

File under “Department of Why Not?”

Comments

What's that smell? To quote a 1980s punchline.

There was also a baker who made bread using vaginal yeast as I recall.

A few months ago I learned that salt-rising bread, which is often mentioned as being baked by settlers in the US especially in Appalachia, doesn't use salt to rise (which doesn't make sense anyway) but instead uses infectious bacteria -- a strain that can cause gangrene an diarrhea in humans.
https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/04/23/305659383/bake-bread-like-a-pioneer-in-appalachia-with-no-yeast

Thanks, but apparently cooking kills the yeasty type salt-rising germs: "But the strains in the bread do not usually cause food poisoning, he says. And baking the microbes "significantly" reduces their number, "to the point where they should not be a threat.""

Bonus trivia: blue-cheese has mold growing on it?! It's a blue mold, so it must be penicillin?

I smell a rat.

Oh yes, smells can take you different places.

I was born in a small oil town, thus every time I drive by a large refinery, or asphalt being laid on the road and there's this smell on the air.......i remember my first home.

I love the smell in gas stations among the pumps. When I was a child this smell was linked to long road trips and awesome vacations.

Diving gear. The first time you breathe under water the air feels and smells strange. It's a weird mix of air with low humidity, metal, rubber and sea water. So, when you're under the sea you're not smelling the sea but the system that keeps you alive. I'm really curious to know what the astronauts smell.

The article author displays great ignorance when he stated smell is not that important compared to vision and hearing. Really? As if people did not care about FOOD and DRINKS. Just imagine if wine, beer or a grilled t-bone had no smell.

Dog lovers are familiar with the smells produced by dogs when dogs are anxious or excited. Dogs also shed hair when anxious - you can actually see the hair falling off the dog. Readers may recall Scent of a Woman, the 1992 film starring Al Pacino. Hoo-ah! Some reviewers considered the film a dog, but Pacino won an academy award for his performance.

Didn't Al Pacino also get an Oscar for Dog Day Afternoon? I guess I could Google it...yes, he did and it was nominated for five Oscars (don't know if Pacino won but apparently he should have).

It's a dog's world. That's what my dog tells me. “I subscribe to the law of contrary public opinion: if everyone thinks one thing, then I say bet the other way.” Pacino or Cowen?

Reminds me of this scene from "Harold and Maude" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wj9KSWJhO8

Tolaas is onto something. Reminds me of a paper a professor I had once published on fear signalling in humans through sweat. fMRI showed increased amygdala response in participants that were exposed to the sweat of first-time skydivers. *
Paper: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006415

I'm surprised this isn't used more in art. Imagine if this was presented alongside a painting like Guernica. The eyes intellectually grasp the suffering intellectually, but the smell would evokes a more visceral response. Perhaps, this is the easier way to elicit an emotional response. Although, creating art that can only be experienced on site might be a losing game in the age of the internet.

*Funny thing. Wired took this to mean that the Pentagon was investigating weaponizing human fear. https://www.wired.com/2008/01/pentagon-resear/

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