Viral Markets in Everything

The Persistence of Chaos is an Airgapped Samsung 10.2-Inch Blue Netbook (2008) that is running Windows XP SP3 and 6 pieces of malware that collectively caused some $95 billion in damages. One of the worms trapped on the computer, for example, is:

SoBig

SoBig was a worm and trojan that circulated through emails as viral spam. This piece of malware could copy files, email itself to others, and could damage computer software/hardware. This piece of malware caused $37B in damages and affected hundreds of thousands of PCs.

The terms of sale include the following:

The sale of malware for operational purposes is illegal in the United States. As a buyer you recognize that this work represents a potential security hazard. By submitting a bid you agree and acknowledge that you’re purchasing this work as a piece of art or for academic reasons, and have no intention of disseminating any malware. Upon the conclusion of this auction and before the artwork is shipped, the computer’s internet capabilities and available ports will be functionally disabled.

The current high bid is over $1,200,750.

Hat tip: Paul Kedrosky.

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Pshaw - the Pirate Bay has caused trillions in damages, if the claims of the RIAA et al are to be believed. And no need to buy the Pirate Bay - anyone can access it whenever they wish.

But this is hilarious - 'The current high bid is over $1,200,750.' I wonder how much my L0pht 'tools' CD would be worth these days as 'art.' One assumes my Illegal Art DVD has the same value as before - that is, anyone interested can find it easily enough, no need to buy it.

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Attention. All's quiet. The demonstrations are peaceful. There is neither unrest nor turmoil whatsoever.

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Malware created by the NSA wreaks chaos: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/25/us/nsa-hacking-tool-baltimore.html

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Someone who is wellthy buys it and just reverse ingenears it?

If you want malware, it isn't difficult to find. Those of us who work in infrastructure and security tend to have copies of stuff because we defend against it, and if you're looking to commit crime yourself, toolkits for sale are easy to find, too. Install Tor and start poking around.

This is just (bad) art.

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In previous gilded ages, were the wealthy quite so stupid?

The wealthy in previous gilded ages purchased ornamental hermits.

I did not know that.

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Why is damaging the hardware done only after sale?

Why hasn't the hardware already been damaged? Or is this "air gapped" computer generating revenue for the owners by wifi connections sending out malware encrypting computer data and demanding ranson payments to the owner?

The buyer will be a data security insurer acting to stop new claims?

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US has introduced some new rules and regulations but markets are selling malwares with different details as common men can't judge it either it is malware or normal product. You have covered the viral markets very well and I have visited PapersBattle source for learning in it in broad sense. Thanks for making it clear for everyone to read and be careful about these marketing terms.

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