*Terminator: Dark Fate*

Much of the movie is set in Mexico, to excellent effect, and arguably the main lines of the plot mirror some themes from Nahua culture and history:

“…the Aztec saw themselves as “the People of the Sun,” whose divine duty was to wage cosmic war in order to provide the sun with his tlaxcaltiliztli (“nourishment”). Without it, the sun would disappear from the heavens.”  Link here.

Quetzalcoatl descending into the land of the dead, and the breaking of the bones.

“…a sibling rivalry grew between Quetzalcoatl and his brother the mighty sun, who Quetzalcoatl knocked from the sky with a stone club.”

“…When the Aztecs sacrificed people to Huitzilopochtli (the god with warlike aspects) the victim would be placed on a sacrificial stone. The priest would then cut through the abdomen with an obsidian or flint blade.”  Link here.

Overall the movie reminded me of Rogue OneRogue One did not have the freshness or originality of the core Star Wars movies, but it was a member of the actual franchise in a way that some of the later sequels were not, and thus a refreshing reminder of what the whole thing was all about in the first place.

Comments

"The New Testament One did not have the freshness or originality of the Old Testament, but it was a member of the actual franchise in a way that some of the later sequels-- like the Book of Mormon--were not, and thus a refreshing reminder of what the whole thing was all about in the first place."

Nice to see someone actually complement the New Testament rather than just reject it as an unnecessary reboot.

Many economists believe that they complement the New Testament (and other holy scriptures, such as Keynes's General Theory or Smith's Wealth of Nations) but very few compliment it.

+.5 I'm not part of the grammar police, but I'll give credit for creativity. By the way, Galen, the Greek physician and philosopher in the Roman Empire, was annoyed by forgeries (especially of his own work), so he published a book to help distinguish his work from forgeries. Galen? See Rogue One.

It's wonderful that you are getting thoughts from this article as well as
from our argument made here.

Sequels! All they have are sequels.

> “Rogue One did not have the freshness or originality of the core Star Wars movies, but it was a member of the actual franchise in a way that some of the later sequels were not”

Yep. Disney shat the bed with The Last Jedi, that's for sure.

Wait. You actually liked it??

Rogue One was probably the only sequel that was fresh and original. It was dark in the way a story about fighting an oppressive, evil empire was supposed to be.

It didn't have any stupid, cute furry things. It was a gritty, adult movie with a sad, sacrificial ending.

The first trilogy focused on the unbounded optimism of the revolutionaries. That's a legitimate point of view for movies. The idea that "adult" means "gritty" and "sad" is pure nonsense.

The original trilogy had dark moments, often very dark. Before the first half of the first movie is over a woman watches her home planet get destroyed. The difference is that while shows like "Game of Thrones" focus on those moments, the original "Star Wars" trilogy didn't. They were there, but they weren't the reason for the movies.

I disagree. Life is gritty and sad, especially in war. Reality is adult.

I agree that the original trilogy was lighthearted entertainment with clear deliberations between good and evil. That was typical of the comic book genre that preceded it. The existence of some "dark moments" of remote disaster, such as a depersonalized planet exploding doesnt make it adult. Quite the contrary. The sequel brought a little more horror to this by showing people on the target planet watching the energy blast arrive. Same with Rogue One.

Every episode except R1 was a KIDS movie. Like early Disney classics, there were themes of death. This dont make them adult. They were just from a time when death was more prevalent and personal and children less sheltered. E.g. opening scene with Bambis mom.

R1 was more like a James Bond film.

Very funny swerve with that last line. Adult . . . like a James Bond movie.

"Life is gritty and sad..."

That says more about you than it does about life. Life HAS gritty and sad moments, sure--but it also has happy and uplifting ones. To focus on the negative is just as distorted a viewpoint as focusing solely on the positive.

"The existence of some "dark moments" of remote disaster, such as a depersonalized planet exploding doesnt make it adult."

I think you and I disagree on what constitutes an "adult" movie. Your use of the term is circular: Adult is gritty, ergo anything not gritty isn't Adult.

Regardless, I suggest you re-watch the original series. Luke's aunt and uncle are roasted alive; they're nearly crushed; they fight for their lives against the Death Star; Luke ends up nearly eaten twice; Han is relentlessly tortured; Luke loses a hand; I could go on and on. The Ewoks are shown morning their dead during a battle; hardly light-hearted stuff! I'm not saying these were horrific movies, just that they were hardly as light-hearted as you seem to think. They had heavy moments.

The difference is, while "Game of Thrones" revels in this stuff, often at the expense of the story and dissolving into nothing more than torture-porn (haven't seen the show, but I read the books), "Star Wars" presents it as something that happens, but not the main focus.

"Reality is adult."

I think this illustrates our differences better than anything. I agree--reality is VERY adult. However, I include pleasures as well as pain in this. There are the typical ones: alcohol, sex, and the like. There are also the less-considered. It's a very adult pleasure to work in a garden and see it grow in front of you. It's an adult pleasure to master a skill (that's why football movies work: they show boys becoming adults by mastering a specific skillset). It's a very adult pleasure to watch your sons grow to be men, gaining skills and confidence to go out on their own. Good, honest work is an adult pleasure (for children it's a drudgery). A movie can focus on these adult pleasures and be both very mature and very happy.

Honestly, it's only angsty teenage overgrown children that think that life is nothing but pain and misery--and usually it's only those who've never experienced real pain or tragedy. Those who have experienced tragedy tend, in my experience, to view life as a mixed bag, leaning one way or another at times, but generally more good than bad.

"It didn't have any stupid, cute furry things. It was a gritty, adult movie with a sad, sacrificial ending."

I wish someone would remake the entire Star Wars series with this ethos in mind. I hope a generation of adults raised on Game of Thrones is going to demand a bit more grit from their cinema.

Oops, that was supposed to be a reply to Willitts

I got you. And I agree.

Not gonna get that from MouseCorp.

Let's face it, a movie suitable for all ages makes more money.

"Overall the movie reminded me of Rogue One. Rogue One did not have the freshness or originality of the core Star Wars movies, but it was a member of the actual franchise"

Rogue One was a good story that didn't try to break new ground and avoided making controversial and dumb decisions. My understanding is that Terminator Dark Fate kills off John Connor immediately and, once again, tries to re-write the series story line. It's the equivalent of killing of Han Solo to make a cheap plot point.

In which Tyler tries to polish a turd. With Aztec allegories no less!

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