Singapore facts of the day

At Changi, one of the world’s great travel hubs, traffic plunged from 5.9 million passengers in January to a mere 25,200 in April — a 99.5 percent drop. The number of airlines serving the airport collapsed from 91 to 35. Two of the four main terminals have been temporarily mothballed; plans for a fifth have been set back at least two years.

Here is the full article, about the retreat of globalization.

Comments

Yeah, the retreat of globalization over a virus... there is a lot of evidence for that. Globalization retreated for a decade after the 1957/58 pandemic, then stalled for years after the 1968 pandemic and has mostly stopped since the AIDS pandemic that began in the 1980s.

The WaPo and Tyler are calling this one, though.

Retreat? Of course not.

Isolation being used to prevent viral spread in countries currently able to handle the virus? Definitely. Japan or Singapore or South Korea or Taiwan or China are very unlikely to be accepting any American visitors without extremely strict isolation measures into the foreseeable future.

I’d be surprised if China accepted any tourists this summer. A few houses down from me, is a Chinese woman married to a Korean. They have a kind five or six months ago. He’s still not been allowed back into China.

I’m not sure any visas issued before the entry band are even considered valid. I had to get a new residence permit two months ago or so. Complete redesign. Different color, new security features, different lettering, photo included. At least some American air carriers have resumed flights. Ticket prices are probably still insane.

China won't even take back their own citizens stranded in the US, it's highly doubtful they will accept visa holders.

On the other hand, if you're China, keeping a bunch of your citizens within the borders of a primary geopolitical rival might be the next step in the master plan.

Say, how did all these Chinese citizens end up in the United States anyway?

Search for an image of the inside of a Foxconn factory then ask yourself if you picture Americans glad to perform that work for those wages. Shark Lasers thinks it's going to happen.

Wow, put up the Bat-signal and everything. What I'm hearing is that you're perfectly fine with forcing people of color to work in abysmal conditions in sweatshops as long as you get your consumer electronics for cheap. And people say I'm racist.

You're a liar. They can quit.

A lot of countries depend on tourism , so that's an issue for them. They will have to make extra efforts to make people feel safe. Travelers as well don't want to travel somewhere and be placed in quarantine. on arrival or on return.
Perhaps countries can enter into regional agreements. if you're from NZ, you are free to travel to Australia and back for example, no quarantine on either side.

The flow of goods does not need to be affected, only the flow of people so Iphones can still be manufactured by FoxConn. Globalization may continue.

Perhaps, or not. Recall during the Nixon wage and price controls of the early 1970s, in a little known incident, Nixon temporarily suspended US rice exports to Japan. Japan then used this as a pretext for food security and started subsidizing rice farmers, a practice that continues to this day. For Japan, rice globalization ended (as did food imports generally). Hence Japan makes really good marbled beef (Kobe!...RIP) and a really expensive and perfect gift melon that I think nobody eats (I wonder if they taste good?). The same can happen in the USA with manufacturing, automated of course (nobody wants to work at Foxconn wages in the USA). Actually with some textile tariffs, the US in the Carolinas with textiles did automate textile manufacturing to the point where today they actually hold their own against Chinese and Bangladesh imports, for certain textiles (I think it's rugs, but not sure). It can be done.

Bonus trivia: 200k passengers a day at Changi, SNG is roughly the number of spectators at RFK/FedEx stadium in DC, every day, mostly during business hours, passing through. A lot of people. And all moved with planes seating 200-300 people. Kind of like DC Metro but probably more efficient.

Correction: Actually since RFK/FedEx stadium seats 82k, it's about 5.9/364/.0082 = 1.97 or twice as many people in FedEx stadium moved every day.

"For Japan, rice globalization ended (as did food imports generally)."

Japan imports about 60% of its food each year, which came to $60 billion in 2013. It's the fourth largest agriculture importer in the world after the US, China and EU.

I hardly drove before the virus spread; now I drive even less.

How dare they try to make Trump look bad. Typical leftists.

Most of what I think I know about Singapore I learned from Cowen. Thank you very much. Would Singapore be Singapore without China. Or would China be China without Singapore. That's the question (or questions, since both questions could be true). Maybe it's people in China and elsewhere avoiding the Singapore flu. Maybe it's Singapore restricting travel to avoid the New York (now Florida/Texas) flu. I might point out that the number of flights in Europe dropped almost 90% compared to 2019, and it's projected to take a very long time to recover, if at all. https://www.eurocontrol.int/covid19 My view: reports of the death of trade are greatly exaggerated. While people are susceptible to deadly viruses, goods (and bots) are not. Well, that's not quite right: trade in goods is susceptible to politically motivated viruses.

Here is Will Wilkinson again on stopping the spread of the coronavisu, this time directed at Republicans. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/29/opinion/republicans-coronavirus.html It's his idea for dividing America into zones (green, yellow, orange, and red) and restricting movement (travel) between the green and red zones, but this time the zones are used to prioritize testing and tracing (with the highest priority in the green and yellow zones to prevent them from becoming orange or red). It's unstated but the purpose of testing and tracing is to identify where spreading is at the highest risk. Of course, we already know that, but people ignore what they know in order to do what they wish to do. Like attend church or temple. Testing and tracing provides the evidence that churches and temples (and other places) are at high risk, scaring people into staying away from them. Does Wilkinson actually believe Republicans would support such restrictions on religious liberty? Why do Americans have to be treated like adolescents? Because they behave like adolescents.

Zoning makes a lot of sense. I believe domestic travel restrictions would be unconstitutional. However, perhaps there could be required or at least strongly recommended testing or quarantine for travel from red to green zones.

Cuomo denounced Rhode Island's attempt to close it's border to New Yorkers, and rayward had nothing to say. In case anyone thought there was any sincerity at work here.

Of course travel will and should fall during a pandemic. The big question is whether it will bounce back once the pandemic is over or whether some degree of “de-globalization” will become permanent. In earlier months, I feared the latter, but I am more optimistic now as many countries are already reducing their travel restrictions and even setting up incentives for tourism, and other countries are making deals to allow skilled workers to continue to travel. The US is starting to seem more like an outlier in this regard.

I know that "mothballed" is a figure of speech, but I prefer to imagine that the terminals were literally filled with mothballs.

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