What are fungi?

I don’t view this as a formal answer, but it is interesting nonetheless:

Mycelium is how fungi feed.  Some organisms — such as plants that photosynthesize — make their own food.  Some organisms — like most animals — find food in the world and put it inside their bodies, where it is digested and absorbed.  Fungi have a different strategy.  They digest the world where it is and then absorb it into their bodies…

The difference between animals and fungi is simple: Animals put food in their bodies, whereas fungi put their bodies in the food.

…to embed oneself is an irregular and unpredictable food supply as mycelium does, one must be able to shape-shift.  Mycelium is an living, growing, opportunistic investigation — speculation in bodily form.

That is from the new and excellent book by Merlin Sheldrake, Entangled Life: How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds, & Shape Our Futures.

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For the insights to be gained from this book - How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence by Michael Pollan

Shrooms make speculation in bodily form cosmic.

America is increasingly divided between those that do thing, often useful things, and those that have a piece of parchment which stands as a claim the owner is on a much higher level because they think of superior things.[1]

These days people recognize that the parchment is not worth the paper it is written on but that is another story.

This is a great example of that divide. If you want to eat mushrooms, just eat some damn mushrooms. People have been doing that for millennia. They did not have to write a 300 page manifesto on how it could change the entire world through unlocking some secret universe of meaning. It was lame when Castaneda was doing it.

You can buy furniture made out of straw and fungi. The fungi are left to put out "roots" into the straw. The whole thing is then heat treated and pressed. Meh.

[1] The solution, obviously, is Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Because at least you get your bike fixed.

I suppose knowledge for its own sake is useless. Ask any scientist =O:~'

It is not a search for knowledge. It is a thinly disguised plea for legalization.

I don't see a lot of searching for knowledge going on on modern university campuses. Especially outside STEM. I see the opposite - the determined closing of minds to anything that might be true, beautiful or interesting.

He's talking about STEM, you dipshit. Mycology, biology, and medicine are all proper sciences.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/newsroom/news-releases/johns-hopkins-launches-center-for-psychedelic-research

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Point of order: Just because the scientist assumes the knowledge is for its own sake, others may find good usage.

Living, such as it is, in the intellectual detritus of science building and creating. cf engineering.

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Author’s Note

What follows is based on actual occurrences. Although much has been changed for rhetorical purposes, it must be regarded in its
essence as fact. However, it should in no way be associated with that great body of factual information relating to orthodox Zen
Buddhist practice. It’s not very factual on motorcycles, either.

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I've just finished this & echo TC's point; an excellent book & I learned a lot.

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Humans are a bit more like fungi than other animals, in that we use mechanical processing and heat external to our bodies to partially pre-digest food before we put it in our mouths.

Humans unleashed themselves from natural constraints, and built civilization.

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For those who've read the book - is it a proper fact-laden story or one of those books that could be condensed into a few pages of actual content without losing anything of value?

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True, this is one of the best books I have ever read.
The word symbiosis was coined by a Fungi researcher, Albert Bernhard Frank.
He is another excerpt:

"It's the narrative that we tell that needs to be examined. I'd really love to get past the language and try to understand the phenomenon. Once again, it may be more helpful to ask why this behavior has evolved in the first place: who stands to benefit.

Today, the study of shared mycorrhizal networks is one of the fields most commonly beset with political baggage. Some portray these systems as a form of socialism by which wealth of the forest can be redistributed. Others take inspiration from mammalian family structures and parental care, with young trees nourished by their fungal connections to older and larger "mother trees". Some describe networks in terms of "biological markets," in which plants and fungi are portrayed as rational economic individuals trading on the floor of an ecological stock exchange, engaging in "sanctions," "strategic trading investments," and "market gains."

The New Yorker had a very good, and positive, review of Sheldrake's book a couple of months ago. It mentioned those economic analogies that some mycologists have been making and cited another book about fungi, specifically matsutake mushrooms: Tsing's _The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins_. As one can tell from the title, Tsing looks at the local and global markets for mushrooms; I infer that she takes a dim view of the market solution although I'm guessing for the same underlying reason that Coase would: most mushroom species are gathered wild with the usual common property problems associated with exploiting natural resources that lack assigned property rights.

I was not expecting some much economics to creep into mycological studies!

Because I read that review, this is one of the few books that I'd heard of and planned to buy prior to Tyler posting about it.

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Symbiosis? Does this blog post relate to the previous blog post? HK and Guangdong province do have a symbiotic relationship. Who stands to benefit from the fungi in Ireland?

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>>What are fungi?

Please tell me how to become one so women will date me.

They want a real man not a yeast infection.

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Can you date a fungi? I assume they don't have growth rings

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This joke is too low-brow for most of the people on this site to understand.

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Fun guy on a date? Time to toss that date.
https://journalspress.com/isolation-and-identification-of-pathogenic-fungi-associated-with-date-palm-fruits-phoenix-dactylifera-in-gombe-metropolis-abba-h-m-mohammed-h-t-and-cleophas-a-b

Also if they smell bad, are discolored, or have visitors.
https://www.thekitchn.com/3-signs-its-time-to-toss-your-dates-244017

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Lichen are next level.

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Rupert Sheldrake, biologist: two sons, Merlin and Cosmo.

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I have been
Called a
Fun Guy.

And,
I have a symbiotic relationship
With
My wife.

A fun guy hooked up with my Aunt Algae and now they're inseparable. They took a real mutual lichen to each other.

I want to do something with "won't be long till they say mildew" or, "they enjoy dancing to the moldy-oldies", but I haven't got it.

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Wow, #1 beat seller in Amazon’s Mushrooms in Biological Sciences category - must be good.

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A mushroom walks into a bar and buys everyone a drink. What a fun guy.

Well he must have been a toadstool on account of the bar being so crowded there wasn't mushroom.

+1

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Fungi discovered at Chernobyl can eat radiation and may be used as part of a living radiation shield for space travel: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.16.205534v1

Well, that will stop the great pain of space. But it will mean Scanners live in vain.

Besides, where do you think the Spacing Guild comes from?

Ooops - different time line.

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There were some cool ideas in "Scanners Live in Vain" in particular the human costs of dangerous activities and the extreme measures to protect humans from them, as well as the rent-seeking behavior of guilds.

But even as a high school student I had no patience for the stilted dialog. "Scanner live in vain!" -- who talks like that? When the automobile was invented, did the horse carriage industry say "buggy whip manufacturers live in vain"? When Excel came along did tech people say "Lotus lives in vain"? Or CDs: "Vinyl lives in vain".

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Plants eat radiation all day so that is not a big surprise. Maybe not the frequency that was emitted at Chernobyl, but they find the frequency we call "light" yummy.

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I like the title. Makes fungi sound like the Scottish Enlightenment or something. The guy next to me says fungi are slightly more closely related to animals than plants.

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Tylers been doing a lot of fungi reading lately. Tyler, if you are planning to grow your own magic mushrooms, I fully support this activity, and hope that you share.

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And the ones that Tyler gives you, don't do anything at all

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Don't forget Euglena, single-celled animals that can photosynthesize as well as assimilate food from the outside.

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today in pangolin history
satire or cullty cult
the media memezombies just rebranded the protest/riots
as a "manufactured crisis"
& Attorney General Barr says the russia hoax was bogus from the beginning

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